Concordance for Ethelred Preston, or, The adventures of a newcomer / By Francis J. Finn ...

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1.   he Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh 
2. On the Run Bobby in Movieland PS Facing Danger His Luckiest Year. A Sequel to "
3. A Sequel to "Lucky Bob" Lucky Bob Making a Boy of Him Tom Playfair; or, Making a
4. ng a Boy of Him Tom Playfair; or, Making a Start Harry Dee; or, Working It Out P
5. r, Making a Start Harry Dee; or, Working It Out Percy or, Wynn; Claude Lightfoot
6. poses to VI. Ethelred puts on the Boxing Gloves, VII. Ethelred in the Frying-pan
7. xing Gloves, VII. Ethelred in the Frying-pan, VIII. In . . .79 . which Ed Devere
8. NTS. PAGB XV. XVI. In whicrr *he Darling goes into Business and the Midgets into
9. s a God195 in XVII. In which the Darling Runs away Earnest, Good 201 XVIII. A Me
10. est, Good 201 XVIII. A Memorable Morning, . . * .211 . XIX. Ethelred Preston, Br
11. , College, on a bright Wednesday morning towards the end of January, Father Edmu
12. munds, the reverend president was gazing with a look of of Henryton weariness up
13. to letters upon and work at distributing. While slipping the at his side from hi
14. and work at distributing. While slipping the at his side from his hand to a tabl
15. scanned their superscriptions, dropping some to the right and a great larger pi
16. t cases at a glance, and without opening their wrappers, the general character o
17. sives. Before he had done with examining ket had received current sorted, litera
18. basof a very generous moiety The morning's mail thus Father Edmunds touched his
19. sident/' said Father Ed- munds, pointing to the mail of the students. The secret
20. ail in his . hands, and withdrew. Having thus Father careful letters, narrowed h
21. self to a more examination. Again taking up the he selected his own. Opening fir
22. king up the he selected his own. Opening first these, he skimmed rapidly over th
23. ed rapidly over the five, pigeon- holing three and dropping two into the wasteba
24. five, pigeon- holing three and dropping two into the wastebasket. It But the si
25. d was a very lengthy production. Setting aside the evidence of the perfumery, th
26. own and across the page in fat sprawling letters, where ms and w's and ns and Fa
27. gh such skipped, letters before. Nothing could be nothing taken for granted. the
28. letters before. Nothing could be nothing taken for granted. the Not in- frequent
29. re thickest. He began, then, the reading with mild resignation. Suddenly an expr
30. an expression of his features: awakening interest came upon as to he reached the
31. small boys of Henryton College are going to be dulness. I awakened from see thei
32. ws and he has gone quite far in spelling and botany, including the language of f
33. te far in spelling and botany, including the language of flowers I have taught h
34. him myself, and in my teachings darling My boy and — — I have addressed mys
35. nd conscientious to a degree approaching scrupulosity. And is yet am not, after
36. talk, accompanied with a little coaxing, will never fail to bring him to his se
37. little coaxing, will never fail to bring him to his senses. He has never been su
38. a delicate child. Just after teeth- ing he contracted a severe illness. [Here t
39. arious ailments and maladies, mentioning incidentally, but at some length, sever
40. our times a day — twice in the morning and twice in the afternoon, " The boy s
41. oon, " The boy should by all means bring a cow along," muttered the vice-preside
42. should have sweet bread every at morning at breakfast, a glass of port wine dinn
43. nd dry toast at supper. "He should bring his cook along too," inter- jected the
44. elieve that there are the moral training there is excellent. Miss Martin, whose
45. one who has had such home train- — ing as my Ethelred has enjoyed. If there ar
46. ere are any good Catholic boys attending your College, 5 ETHELRED PRESTON. suppo
47. r College, 5 ETHELRED PRESTON. supposing, of course, that their manners 1 some s
48. see no objection to my boy's associating with them under due inspection. I am it
49. ave explained to you my reason for being obliged to separate myself from my swee
50. . telegram from London, England, stating that my husband has there been attacked
51. y the next steamer. Gladly would I bring my little Ethelred along, but the poor
52. to seasickness would be literally flying in the face of providence to imperil hi
53. lth— may- hap is his life —by taking him along. but it The parting made. Aga
54. by taking him along. but it The parting made. Again and again I beg you to best
55. o bestow every attention upon my darling, and a mother s prayer and a mother's b
56. mother s prayer and a mother's blessing will accompany you through difficult, m
57. rough difficult, moist be life. Thanking you in advance for your kindness, and a
58. in advance for your kindness, and asking you to overlook the inaccuracies and bl
59. ars for Ethelred's expenses. On reaching London I shall forward more. My child w
60. child will reach you on Thursday morning. I have been holding him back in hopes
61. on Thursday morning. I have been holding him back in hopes of getting some trust
62. een holding him back in hopes of getting some trusted friend to accompany him on
63. , but could hardly do so without missing the Be a father, dear reverend sir, to
64. r, to first steamer. my precious darling. E. P. the president " Such a boy, rema
65. to acter," char- " Not if he's anything at all like what his mother makes him o
66. re was no objection. On the next morning, at about card. the same hour, the coll
67. om his lips. And he had reason for being astonished. 1 ETHELRED PRESTON. CHAPTER
68. \ I 7*HILE Father Edmunds was mastering astonishment in the parlor, his matters
69. parlor, his matters were not proceeding with their wonted smoothness in the cla
70. rofessor, Mr. Gade. He as was explaining the sequence fortieth or fiftieth time,
71. t of tenses (for the said), in and eying, he spoke, a young gentleman ner seats.
72. one of the cor- he counted upon catching the he must have been disappointed. scr
73. must have been disappointed. scribbling very industriously, and, all The boy wa
74. triously, and, all The boy was according to seeming, utterly oblivious of everyt
75. nd, all The boy was according to seeming, utterly oblivious of everything about
76. seeming, utterly oblivious of everything about him, save the sheet of paper acro
77. r across which his pencil was travelling. The upon professor finally paused ; hi
78. neasiness. ETHELRED PRESTON. "This thing has gone too far! 19 " said Mr. Gade, c
79. ne too far! 19 " said Mr. Gade, changing his tone of voice. He spcke low because
80. you. your For five have been explaining the sequence principally in tenses, for
81. it. The theme you handed that if morning shows me you ever knew anything about t
82. morning shows me you ever knew anything about the con- struction of a Latin sen
83. ed There had his kind words, and, loving him, dreaded his displeasure above all
84. very his compressed pockets, and putting hands into strode out with something of
85. ing hands into strode out with something of a the manner of the impression swagg
86. . " A fellow know how much by not having fun he's having in our till something g
87. w how much by not having fun he's having in our till something goes wrong; and t
88. ng fun he's having in our till something goes wrong; and then we it. know weeks
89. n we it. know weeks it But what's coming last over Earl Meriwether anyhow these
90. could see that he was annoyed. Something has gone wrong with the same boy at He
91. d, and in this makes me blue I him going down way. thing. still, am really puzzl
92. akes me blue I him going down way. thing. still, am really puzzled about the who
93. He's the most popular boy but he's going to lose his popularity he doesn't take
94. negligent in his studies, and from being the leader he to the foot. I is now get
95. leader he to the foot. I is now getting down don't think he has last given a go
96. hree weeks, and call I've been expecting Mr. this long Gade to him down I time."
97. I I have been chums, and besides liking him, respect him he more than any boy h
98. read- ' 22 ETHELRED PRESTON, have having a good talk ing-room, and doesn't do an
99. RED PRESTON, have having a good talk ing-room, and doesn't do anything but read
100. d talk ing-room, and doesn't do anything but read and take notes. I felt like wi
101. be in any I humor just now for anything have to say." is There he over near the
102. ep with and fell him on the walk running beside the playroom, " what's the troub
103. s face then he understood. was quivering with emotion, and there was a suspiciou
104. e all get a scold- ETHELRED PRESTON. ing 23 now and then, you know, and it I sup
105. rL every time." I deserved that scolding ?" " Since you ask say I it," returned
106. shed and dismayed companion and, seeking a retired spot, gave full vent to his e
107. ised to be of importance in the shaping of Earl's Matters had seemingly come to
108. College for two years and a half. During of the this period he had enjoyed the p
109. a some- what serious turn in everything, of mind, remarkably earnest for his pi
110. long as a year with him before learning that he was not of their religion. He w
111. religion. He won the name first of being a deeply religious lad early in his yea
112. at Henryton. of the It hap- pened during the celebration Holy Sacrifice of the M
113. crifice of the Mass, at which, according to the of custom Henryton College, all
114. r lightly, The boy next him was behaving and several times tion. tried to secure
115. tion, and " Will you give it ? I'm going to ask you an I want an honest answer.
116. didn't," returned tiny Ed, with flashing eyes and considerable vehemence. " Well
117. riwether, which had gone on increas- ing month by month. did not answer Earl's q
118. my disgraceful conduct It's had nothing do with your intention. ever since." be
119. r intention. ever since." been bothering me 26 €i STHELRED PRESTON. That had n
120. €i STHELRED PRESTON. That had nothing whatever to do with my resolve," said E
121. at times in the chapel, without thinking of what we are doing. times a boy actua
122. l, without thinking of what we are doing. times a boy actually doesn't fooling.
123. ng. times a boy actually doesn't fooling. Someis There's a boy here in know that
124. the fellows that he wouldn't do anything wrong for the world. Yet, if you watch
125. re seldom found in one person. " Nothing would hear it," said Ed. please me bett
126. id, I and not particu- larly interesting in itself. wouldn't think even of telli
127. n itself. wouldn't think even of telling interest will it to you, only I in know
128. Catholic church; which was the beginning the end. of his Catholicity —and Trai
129. he had contented himself with asserting that he was a Catholic because his In p
130. use his In practice he was after leaving school parents were of that faith. of n
131. was the embodiment of Catholic teaching and practice. She was shocked by his ET
132. a name of horror and reproach. Brooding day after day over the wreckage of a li
133. ld her tender devotion created a lasting im- and deep pression, religious spirit
134. her can awaken. the boy caught something of of his Insensibly, too, the austere
135. , incoherent passionate, almost greeting of love, she recovered herself, and, in
136. he class, a to the time of the open- ing of the present story, Earl's record wa$
137. n the campus he no longer took a leading part in the sports and games; in a word
138. a word, a decided and most disappointing change had come to Mr. Gade was much co
139. d. class pass. his To him was everything; no wonder, then, that the conduct of E
140. deeply. He had intended vately, calling the boy to account pri- and was only aw
141. oy to account pri- and was only awaiting a favorable oppor- tunity, when Earl's
142. ass precipi- tated matters. The scolding thus given publicly had been received i
143. ints of discipline, and chosen a seeming, downward conceal path. Earl, to all ha
144. dislike three weeks to studies. growing of The in frankness which had character
145. n ordinary prutact. dence and In dealing with of his young charges he rarely mad
146. is story, A few weeks before the opening of college the students had made, as wa
147. rtly through ETHELRED PRESTON, a craving for 53 of the light and consolation rel
148. on, partly through the desire of hearing a burning eloquence, attended man famed
149. through the desire of hearing a burning eloquence, attended man famed the vario
150. h was was through frightit ; the running devious and perilous ways. Earl ened ye
151. s beauties and masked under the enticing allurements which it knows so well how
152. TON. The day that preceded the beginning of the of his life. retreat was the mos
153. om serious sin, but bruised and bleeding, nevertheless, from a long, bitter figh
154. ter which perverts truth It —the lying voice in every possible way. was the vo
155. e suspected the came — and thus trying, feeling very miserable source slept. f
156. ed the came — and thus trying, feeling very miserable source slept. from which
157. ommunicated what he knew to the sleeping boy, Earl's face, dejected in sleep, an
158. . would have grown When on the following day he heard the reverend father depict
159. and describe the methods it; of fighting against when, above all, he warned his
160. nd the Catholic Church, which apas being the proved true itself to his mind and
161. Christ. Thus the retreat, while drawing Earl away, 3<5 ETHELRED PRESTON. from t
162. the slippery brink of for the time being, sin, had plunged him into a phase of d
163. a natural reticence, he could not bring himself to consult or advise with any o
164. eceived, for first time since his coming to college, a public rebuke in the clas
165. lic rebuke in the class-room. struggling He had been hard on that eventful morni
166. e had been hard on that eventful morning to pay attention, and, although he was
167. tention, and, although he was scribbling mechanically at the moment of rebuke, h
168. at the highest point when they something are else. apparently engrossed with Ear
169. to this class. When Mr. Gade, fastening his eyes on Earl, ETrpLRED PRESTON. sai
170. they come in closest contact. " That ing with settles it," muttered Earl, as, qu
171. entionally misinterpreted the underlying motives. Eddie in consequence, though h
172. to understand the exact After receiving the kind sympathy to of his best friend
173. is best friend, Earl still was returning still the class-room, to sore and angry
174. red mate. She seemed and she did nothing but the time. isn't I ah suppose he's a
175. ppose he's a sort of a wax-doll, darling! " this, he " ? mamma's Father Howard h
176. ctly to the parlor; start, and on facing the newcomer he gave a much more percep
177. lips. He child, had counted upon coming face small, delicate, fragile, to face
178. e with a golden-haired attired according to the manner of a mamma's darling. Ins
179. rding to the manner of a mamma's darling. Instead of all this he found himself f
180. tead of all this he found himself facing an overgrown boy, with close- cropped s
181. large, coarse, round feat- and something very like a cast in the left eye. This
182. embraced further and no less interesting details of the newcomer's personal appe
183. er Ethelred wore a smile such as nothing but a large mu*H fatuousness could effe
184. a comical expres- Ethelred was standing; and his pose failed to show that he ha
185. ly a slouchy hat, which, on encountering the president's eye, he began to turn a
186. ent. The smile vanished like the passing of a flash of light. " Yes," came the r
187. ggled with the lower notes of a changing voice, to the manifest disadvan- tage o
188. age of both. 42 ETHELRED PRESTON. Having acquitted himself of this monosyllable,
189. ed,' continued ' Father Edmunds, holding out Ethelred ceased evident distress fi
190. evident distress first his hand. smiling, and glanced with at the proffered hand
191. the table. He grinned at it; then facing the president he said: M No." He seemed
192. with a smile which, though accompanying his words, was really explanation. evok
193. six- " Yes," assented Ethelred, turning towards his hat, and giving Father Edmu
194. red, turning towards his hat, and giving Father Edmunds an oppor- tunity of noti
195. her Edmunds an oppor- tunity of noticing that his coat was rather loosefitting b
196. ng that his coat was rather loosefitting below the old collar. " But I've growed
197. llar. " But I've growed. the interesting The when woman," continued youth, " tal
198. w my mothei his mother." of this During the whole animated dialogue Ethelred ha
199. he off effect was not unlike the turning on and light. tace, of a search- Before
200. ight. tace, of a search- Before speaking he became solemn of and having delivere
201. speaking he became solemn of and having delivered his remarks, rest, he lapsed
202. for the senior depart- ment; but acting under the impression me ETHELRED PRESTO
203. come with me, Ethelred, without changing his position, stood gazing intently and
204. hout changing his position, stood gazing intently and smiling upon the hat. u Is
205. ition, stood gazing intently and smiling upon the hat. u Is there anything else,
206. miling upon the hat. u Is there anything else, Ethelred ' ? " Gimme that hat." F
207. at Father Howard's room, before entering after the president, Ethelred, midway u
208. d, my boy ?" asked Father Howard, taking Ethelred's hand. 46 ETHSLRED u Yes," sa
209. oom, the newcomer awoke from his smiling trance, and ejaculated, " Say! " upon w
210. d, " Say! " upon which he began fumbling in his inner coat pocket. " There! " he
211. t pocket. " There! " he added, producing a sealed envelope, and tendering it to
212. oducing a sealed envelope, and tendering it to Father Edmunds, he " that's for y
213. sement and perplexity read the following: To the President of Henryton College.
214. and cultured family. He is a God-fearing lad, of a very pleasing address, and em
215. is a God-fearing lad, of a very pleasing address, and eminently qualified to ent
216. at, removed thus early from the refining he may and elevating influence of home,
217. y from the refining he may and elevating influence of home, possibly lose that h
218. ch has thus far trait of his — budding character. Hoping that he will receive
219. ait of his — budding character. Hoping that he will receive the care and atten
220. on to which he is entitled, and trusting that his religious views will not be un
221. THY, thought you were a mamma's darling, " blurted out Earl, as he shook I hand
222. to the artless admirer. Earl, submitting hand " €i How much?" I don't remember
223. he kind to meet. You don't get something for nothing ETHELRED PRESTON. very ofte
224. eet. You don't get something for nothing ETHELRED PRESTON. very often nowadays.
225. e ever met," " You don't think I'm going to laughed Earl. " run away, do you ? "
226. of Meanwhile Ethelred had been surveying Earl's clothes with undisguised interes
227. sped Earl. " Haven't you been " studying all your life ? " I guess not. } What k
228. orely. still He was wounded felt chafing It under the sense of justice. was the
229. efully articles of bric-a-brac examining the various the centre-table. on " Yes:
230. ." in " Why, what'llyou Before answering, the door, opened into the corridor. li
231. nd peeped out Because," he said, closing the side, door, and advancing dramatica
232. d, closing the side, door, and advancing dramatically to Earl's " because catch
233. ally to Earl's " because catch I'm going for to run away. jail me staying in any
234. m going for to run away. jail me staying in any —not if You don't I know it."
235. money. Besides, don't care about helping you to run away, anyhow." il You ? said
236. n't see afraid why to you're not willing to help. trust Are as you me ? " he spo
237. . But I haven't ten dollars nor anything like that sum. little I'm a short of mo
238. ESTON. " All right,' ' said Earl, taking out some silver, and selecting a quarte
239. l, taking out some silver, and selecting a quarter. literally Ethelred clutched
240. , at the and then gazed hungrily maining in Earl's fingers. " Couldn't you lend
241. " Ethelred Preston," said Earl, looking the beggar straight out shark." in the
242. red, who had tone, fallen into a whining came in to a sudden pause. There was so
243. n to a sudden pause. There was something him. Earl's flashing eye which cowed I
244. There was something him. Earl's flashing eye which cowed I He added* " Oh, you n
245. mad; ETHELRED PRESTON. was only fooling. I S3 All I wanted I of you was a quart
246. at the place/' " All right I ;, nothing like business. I want to a chance know
247. e things spread very quickly in boarding-schools. Earl meantime answered ironica
248. answered ironically: " Oh, yes; boarding-school boys their greenness.*' are note
249. t no fool. You don't in catch me running away with nothing my pockets." " Ther«
250. 't in catch me running away with nothing my pockets." " Ther«! What do you thin
251. think of that? " cried Earl, forgetting his vexations and troubles in a burst o
252. right and left of the two boys standing on the steps maples formed its boundari
253. ight and the hills beyond lay glittering and dimpling and changing the noble cur
254. hills beyond lay glittering and dimpling and changing the noble curve of one of
255. lay glittering and dimpling and changing the noble curve of one of America's mos
256. d the infirmary, an its ancient building hallowed for traditions; over ' 56 it E
257. n excellent playground, framed a setting of as exquisite scenery as boy or man E
258. . tell " Say, you won't " that I'm going to run away, will you ? It's if " that
259. rejoonated world. No he added, dropping quotation to his from what was evidentl
260. speech, " you I don't catch me attending at a school where am thrown in with Cat
261. own in with Catholics.' " You're talking nonsense," answered Earl " The Catholic
262. ould trample on our flag? round parading their patriotism They don't go without
263. ho are not Americans at all. If shouting for the American all flag counts, the C
264. ag but the when the it comes to fighting for shouters go to Canada and the Catho
265. ics take field. The idea of your talking about not going with Catholic boys. The
266. The idea of your talking about not going with Catholic boys. The boys here are g
267. the level it the playground, on glancing over that feet. it Ethelred was astonis
268. as the junior students came li flocking from the study-hall into the yard. That
269. here," said the modest youth, surveying the entire division with the eye of sco
270. s " ? While the two were thus commenting on the appearance of their schoolmates,
271. ates, Devereux and Haines came strolling past ^them arm in arm. They had heard m
272. reenies they are," whispered the knowing Ethelred welcome, madversion in Earl's
273. Earl's ear, as the two advanced, smiling, to take his hand and bid him He in had
274. who has been for some time at board- ing school, invites teasing on sight. 11 It
275. me at board- ing school, invites teasing on sight. 11 It's a real pleasure to me
276. ur dear ones at home? grief 6 at leaving the " Ethelred, " I'm not a milksop, "
277. ely while Roger and Earl were struggling to keep their countenances: " Why, he s
278. Yes; he's showed call me most everything." " Did he your attention to the associ
279. turned away his face. "What you laughing at? — confound about the you," roared
280. you," roared Ethelred. " He was laughing at what past," explained Ed. buried. I
281. ry which George Washington tied visiting here." his horse, when he came " Is tha
282. ust come down this way," said Ed, moving towards the wall at the lower end. " Yo
283. end. " You see that large stone standing a others in the wall ? little above the
284. off your hats, boys: the weather turning cold. ETHELRED PRESTON. 6$ relic Now go
285. y. " But Protestants don't mind honoring the remains of dead people, provided th
286. se. But they wouldn't care about looking at a bishop's crook to show it reverenc
287. ft of Eddie's remarks, and so, resolving to change the subject, stone ?" and ret
288. is " It's a great relic, as I was saying. You 64 ETHELRED PRESTON. it's see that
289. it." is it ? " urged Ethelred, becoming really interested. " It's the stone on
290. untry. while If his master was betraying it, his you like, you may kiss but don'
291. ed Devereux. his But Ed went on laughing, while panions kept him company. ually
292. the laughIn fact, Earl was Ethelred. ing trio did not hear them. the only one it
293. r them. the only one it who was watching for And was good that he was, with a la
294. t Ed with the evident intent of knocking him down. Earl sprang forward, and caug
295. . You're a coward," he added, addressing himself to Devereux, " and I'll thrash
296. 66 ETHELRED PRESTON. mother, struggling to break loose from Roger and Earl. " H
297. * ' said Ed. " I am to perfectly willing to fight with you according college rul
298. ctly willing to fight with you according college rules. If let you promise not l
299. ange the terms." " Oh, if you're willing to fight, I'll promise* I'm going to te
300. illing to fight, I'll promise* I'm going to teach you a lesson." " Let him loose
301. l in fight with gloves —with it boxing-gloves, rules here, the gymnasium. Acco
302. es, rules here, the gymnasium. According to there's to be all no clinching, but
303. ording to there's to be all no clinching, but Haines and if must be boxing will
304. nching, but Haines and if must be boxing will through. Meriwether be referees ti
305. we call ETHELRED PRESTON. it 67 a boxing contest. If you call it a fight, the bo
306. CHAPTER VI. ETHELRED PUTS ON THE BOXING-GLOVES. TT cannot have escaped the obse
307. s idea of company' manners. In recording the various pearls of wisdom fall which
308. ative, are to from Ethelred's of putting lips, the writer takes the liberty of d
309. st Ethelred's words, not as the charming new-comer actually pronounced them, but
310. ich Ethelred, throughout his interesting college career, with prodigal and artle
311. e, witnessed Earl and Ethelred's meeting, doubtless he would have been puzzled e
312. me of in evidence of their home-training. Ethelred seemed to stand alone. look,
313. far as externals boor. There was nothing, so went, to show that he had known a r
314. w that he had known a refined and loving mother's care, nothing which would lead
315. efined and loving mother's care, nothing which would lead one to suppose that he
316. nt, silly ; Ethelred had gone on smiling in the same way. When again ; he had no
317. no answer, he smiled be- fore answering, he smiled; after answering, he then da
318. re answering, he smiled; after answering, he then da capo. to find it smiled The
319. mong those who make to manners. anything, a new complication was added want of l
320. he boy himself. While Father Edmunds ing over all sits in his study, turn- these
321. He threatened to run away before leaving home; so ETHELRED PRESTON. 71 keep an e
322. y presence, I may That have been looking to see whether wore hoofs. No wonder ne
323. e of his must have come from pure Coming here in such a frame of mind, it is but
324. e mayor's small letter. the boys' dining-hall, meantime, Ethelred was assigned a
325. ds room, that the new-comer was his ling, in the washdar- mamma's and at once he
326. nd at once he was christened " Darl- ing." Blessed with a very good appetite, Et
327. t. original in his methods of satisfying If he wanted something, he stood up and
328. ods of satisfying If he wanted something, he stood up and 72 ETHELRED PRESTON. i
329. reached for and his eagerness in getting the food which he desired was artlessly
330. Say * please,' " answered Peter, holding back the dish and gazing up pertly into
331. Peter, holding back the dish and gazing up pertly into the big fellow's face. A
332. s face. Armed with his fork, the Darling reached for ward and stabbed a potato.
333. seated around the table. Their groaning was cut short by the ringing of a small
334. ir groaning was cut short by the ringing of a small hand-bell. Paying no attenti
335. the ringing of a small hand-bell. Paying no attention to the sound, the Darling
336. g no attention to the sound, the Darling bellowed out, " My meals is paid for."
337. augh. " Sh! " hissed Earl in the Darling's *' ear. Look over Ethelred, there." w
338. ed and saw the prefect, who was standing beside the reader's desk, gaz- ing at h
339. nding beside the reader's desk, gaz- ing at him with a countenance of disapprova
340. proval. ETHELRED PRESTON, On 73 catching the boy's eye, the prefect put his fing
341. ? " he croaked — the is nearest thing to a whisper within the range of his vo
342. ; that boy on the stand over there going to read. We're supposed to listen while
343. reader. " I've seen badgers the Darling to Earl. in a menagerie," croaked " Hav
344. kily for Ethelred he was hungry; senting to hold his tongue provisionally, he ad
345. food. it, When or, if he wanted anything, he reached for that were out of the qu
346. s before the prefect whispered something into his ear. Thereafter he would nudge
347. ge his neighbor when he desired anything, and having thus secured his attention,
348. bor when he desired anything, and having thus secured his attention, would point
349. of a Thus few hours, he had done nothing to secure the respect of any one. On fi
350. ure the respect of any one. On finishing his meal, which, considering his hearty
351. n finishing his meal, which, considering his hearty appetite, he accomplished wi
352. nto his mouth and employed the remaining time spent in the dining-hall in ex- am
353. d the remaining time spent in the dining-hall in ex- amining with lively satisfa
354. spent in the dining-hall in ex- amining with lively satisfaction the pair of cu
355. ond prefect, after dinner, " we're going to little fun in the gymnasium. Darling
356. to little fun in the gymnasium. Darling Ethelred Preston, wanted to fight me, t
357. old will and I him I'd do it with boxing-gloves. There and so be two fellows to
358. no harm done. be an that ordinary boxing-match. the Darling thinks it The later,
359. that ordinary boxing-match. the Darling thinks it The later, fun of is, a regul
360. s. were perched the more Within the ring ETHELRKD PRESTON. were Earl and Roger H
361. rl and Roger Haines, engaged the Darling for the contest. 75 in dressing Roger t
362. Darling for the contest. 75 in dressing Roger took the muscles. liberty of feel
363. ger took the muscles. liberty of feeling Ethelred's He gasped with affected asto
364. ne young gentle- men who had formed ling's 14 the ring advanced and touched, wit
365. e- men who had formed ling's 14 the ring advanced and touched, with exaggerated
366. t potatoes He by the forkful for nothing," piped Peter from his perch on trapeze
367. . * the Ethelred, who had been strutting about like a fighting-cock, and receivi
368. had been strutting about like a fighting-cock, and receiving these attentions wi
369. bout like a fighting-cock, and receiving these attentions with flushed angrily a
370. e ful unsuccessof attempt of the Darling, at the suggestion " 76 ETHELRED PRESTO
371. PRESTON. to Roger Haines, before putting turn on. his gloves inside out them Rog
372. ide out them Roger grinned, and slipping over pered, •' to Ed, whis- He couldn
373. ' to Ed, whis- He couldn't tell a boxing-glove from an air-pump. Just keep him a
374. wo were ready, and stepped into the ring — Ed small, light, wiry; the Dar- lin
375. — Ed small, light, wiry; the Dar- ling heavy, ungainly, three inches taller, l
376. egan to work like the Forthwith, putting his head down, Ethelred's arms of a win
377. f a windmill, and his blows came raining continuously upon the very place where
378. die's feet were quicker than the Darling's arms: he was dancing what looked very
379. than the Darling's arms: he was dancing what looked very like a jig, and at the
380. like a jig, and at the same time warding off the blows with an ease which indica
381. e enthusiasm of the boys and the Darling's anger. The rain " ETHELRED PRESTON, b
382. han ever danced round and round the ring; but it rain which did not fall on the
383. intended to reach. So far as the Darling's intentions were concerned the rain wa
384. ast little bit. Time was called, finding Ed smiling radiantly, Ethelred breathin
385. bit. Time was called, finding Ed smiling radiantly, Ethelred breathing heavily.
386. Ed smiling radiantly, Ethelred breathing heavily. 14 You don't fight fair," pant
387. a lesson. You'll know who you're talking to next time." u To Mamma's Darling," s
388. king to next time." u To Mamma's Darling," sang out Peter from on high. In the n
389. n transferred from arms to his breathing, which had become very heavy and very r
390. five attempts. Then was the the Darling attempted to clinch, referees. but In p
391. " growled Ethelred, whose nose-bleeding had been of the most transient characte
392. r. You " ? don't call that sort of thing a fight, do you " Of course not," assen
393. . 79 CHAPTER VII. ETHELRED IN THE FRYING-PAN. 11 J HEN Ethelred entered the yard
394. is likely to be appreci- ated by one ing-contest. who has just come forth from a
395. on him. solitude, for he was be- ginning to fancy that the boys had been playing
396. to fancy that the boys had been playing However, he was not dismayed. yet. His
397. could not be imposed upon. While walking up and down the yard, he counted his mo
398. d. " That's good dollars for a beginning. have ten by to-morrow noon/' Returning
399. . have ten by to-morrow noon/' Returning the money to his pocket, he walked " 80
400. . Ten or twelve large boys were standing at the boundaries nearest him. They ret
401. after interest, and held a whis- gazing at the group for a well to step over an
402. sor with student's love of fun. Stroking his mustache, sternly, and eying Ethelr
403. troking his mustache, sternly, and eying Ethelred very solemn baritone: " Your n
404. Professor Petersol." And, before turning upon hat with great reverence. his heel
405. if that's what you mean/' into relapsing the smile which had unnerved the presid
406. see/' mused Professor Salvini, tak- ing out a note-book. " Oh, yes, you came he
407. fessor, with .audi vehemence, addressing the solemn and attentive crowd about hi
408. him. " Those two are always interfering with my authority. to Ethelred Preston,
409. d * stamped on* is practi- cally nothing, at least from the point of view of ETH
410. . " The manners of 'sir* "Say the rising generation are simply deplorable." Some
411. to snicker. of the group were beginning " Boys! " continued Professor Petersol,
412. Petersol, " what do you mean by standing around when conducting an examination i
413. mean by standing around when conducting an examination iiere at ? I am Get away
414. e." students addressed The " had nothing for it but to go away. They went very J
415. y lesson after I this young man. Smoking on the sly must stop in this college/ N
416. ly must stop in this college/ Now uating James class, Ellis was a member of the
417. s the young man v/ho, for the time being, was addressed as Probeen called away f
418. fessor Petersol, had just the memorizing of lines to attend to Ethelred. The not
419. helred had magnificent for the departing crowd; and if been dazed by Petersol's
420. e might have perceived that he was being made the victim of a new €i practical
421. hink of Third Commercial! Who your being put in the examined you ?" ETHELRED PRE
422. scharge Father Howard; and I'm beginning to fear that the president must go too.
423. How much time did he spend in examining you ? " resumed Professor Petersol. " A
424. , write a note to Father Howard, stating that we hold his examination null and v
425. round, while this conversation was going on, had almost suddenly become with boy
426. with boys, who were two and all walking up and down in groups of three. These v
427. f its owner was within sight and hearing not set a in Ethelred, was unutterable
428. ontrol contracted by the severe training our college curriculum. Taking the thor
429. training our college curriculum. Taking the thoroughly mystified Ethelred by th
430. ravely towards the study-hall, exhorting the new-comer in a loud voice, the whil
431. i hurried on before them to give warning to the students who might happen to be
432. the study- room, with the understanding that there was to be no loud talking or
433. ing that there was to be no loud talking or boisterous conduct. Professor Peters
434. rous conduct. Professor Petersol, having conducted Ethelred to a seat near the d
435. Cicero's celebrated oration the opening sentence of which our i giddier pupils
436. which our i giddier pupils love to sing to the air of Home, hun- sweet home/ Yo
437. e you had the high honor of first making my acquaintance. Do you understand " Ye
438. ne of the small boys that you are coming over to our —to this side. They might
439. ion. Most of them, all agrin, were eying him un- interruptedly; some, red-faced
440. rruptedly; some, red-faced and quivering, were struggling manfully against the t
441. red-faced and quivering, were struggling manfully against the temptation to laug
442. elaxed from austere gravity. a Something over by, quarter of an hour had gone wh
443. TON. ear; 89 self- whereupon, forgetting his decorum, the appointed study-keeper
444. ur yard at — or our plans for bringing you into this Slip out division to-nigh
445. e you from your memory Ethelred, nothing loath, took his leave; the professor fo
446. perfect and at their books was something so little astonishing that the prefect
447. ooks was something so little astonishing that the prefect gave a start, while hi
448. refect at once understood that something out of the ordinary till had been going
449. out of the ordinary till had been going on; he waited quietly the laughter had
450. tory with such evident enjoyment, taking care to inform the prefect that the boy
451. ce then, all my mind goes wool-gathering the time. I wish you'd pray 92 for in E
452. lt as I ii To-day I were danger of going wrong. I actually hate Mr. full Gade, a
453. e same as ever." afraid not. " I'm thing that has And to-day I said somebothered
454. is put in my charge, I begin by running the place down." A good many fellows sa
455. o it, too. Is that all. I what bothering you " That's not I it. I had a chance t
456. then the boy said that he wasnVin going to stay a jail, and he'd run away to- m
457. in. " Good gracious! It's just the thing! Look here, Earl college. — that fell
458. course, we don't like to go reportit ing on a fellow, unless is really necessary
459. he was, he'd acknowledge that were doing the college a real service. we Now, loo
460. we Now, look; we've got to do one thing or the other report Ethelred as being u
461. ng or the other report Ethelred as being unfit to go with the boys here, or help
462. s mother If on the way I there. anything were to happen to him, should feel resp
463. e for him. And if he then we'll be doing a good act to help him off." " It will
464. help him off." " It will be a good thing for the boys here, certainly," said Ear
465. ase. They like the look upon it as being about the sort of thing which they migh
466. upon it as being about the sort of thing which they might expect from a boy Darl
467. ich they might expect from a boy Darling." M What has become of him, I wonder ?
468. the yard." Eddie chuckled. " I'm willing to bet that he has the hands of the big
469. yton College, there was also the cunning of a few serpents. The comers. students
470. th new- However, arrival if a boy during the to first days of his proved himself
471. knowledge of or gave evidences of being annoyingly conceited, they were not slo
472. ESTON. him to a sense of his in devising plans to bring position. On rare occasi
473. sense of his in devising plans to bring position. On rare occasions, for moreov
474. re arrival still no other reason talking of the new when that worthy came runnin
475. of the new when that worthy came running around the corner of the class-room bui
476. nd the corner of the class-room building. " Hey! there, Darling; you've been out
477. ass-room building. " Hey! there, Darling; you've been out of bounds," called Ed.
478. the tv/o friends. *' What were you doing in the large yard " ? asked Ed. With a
479. large yard " ? asked Ed. With a knowing under his right eye look, Ethelred put
480. to talk, all right. you the I was going to ask you whether they had shown tree
481. hink you're smart," snarled the Dar ling. " But I'm going to show you a point oi
482. ," snarled the Dar ling. " But I'm going to show you a point oi two before I go
483. away unless we to know that you're going home." " The old w my mother has gone E
484. e were about to attack Earl. " I'm going to it my business. It it was into it my
485. ow who'll stop me ? " roared the Darling. " I will," answered Earl quietly. as t
486. wered Earl quietly. as they stood facing each other The two boys formed a striki
487. ach other The two boys formed a striking contrast. li Ethelred blustering, passi
488. triking contrast. li Ethelred blustering, passionate, noisy; Earl quiet, cool, d
489. le so confoundedly, 1 don't mind telling you that the old - — my didn't mother
490. he continued, " you, for one am willing to help you'll give your solemn promise
491. as most eloquent and facile in promising, and in attesting to the truth statemen
492. nd facile in promising, and in attesting to the truth statements. seventy-five i
493. nner changed at once; he was now fawning. Money seemed of to be the one thing up
494. ing. Money seemed of to be the one thing upon which he set value. Earl and Eddie
495. e as exchanged looks disgust the Darling cringed before them. Earl was strongly
496. e the sordid new-comer, and have nothing more acter, to do with him. He was a no
497. they do Eddie went on. said the Darling. " No, you don't," As they wall. spoke,
498. * be the very best." Where are you going to get the rope?'* be no trouble about
499. in hand. " No matter," he said, turning with a perEthelred; fectly serious face
500. 't about little it. You've been imposing on some of the boys here, and have got
501. them alone after we catch you borrowing any more and money, we'll let you take
502. ll be likely to enlighten him." standing at the appointed spot It The two were i
503. appointed spot It The two were iwaiting Ethelred. was a dark night, and the nor
504. , and the north in icy the wind sweeping blasts down from made the place very un
505. for a The thermometer, steadily falling rendezvous. throughout the day, was now
506. ow very near to the The two were chafing their ears zero mark. " If and stamping
507. their ears zero mark. " If and stamping their feet upon the ground. " Isn't it
508. feet upon the ground. " Isn't it getting cold ?" said Sullivan. he doesn't come
509. k, I'll clear out. A joke's a good thing, but I don't propose to freeze to death
510. side of them without taken. " my getting back at him, he's mis- And I haven't fo
511. ollection of tracts on the evil of using fermented wine." " There's hardly a boy
512. ow Oh, here comes the victim." Breathing joined them. heavily, Ethelred at this
513. think it best to go into Before leaving the junior division, he Io6 ETHELRED PF
514. out vengeance upon Peter Lane. Hurrying from the study little hall, and waiting
515. from the study little hall, and waiting till for Peter to pass, he followed him
516. were little thickest, and then, catching the all his man, pro- ceeded to shake h
517. d hinted his plan earlier in the evening to Earl, who, in consequence, was on th
518. d from view: " Ethelred, idea of picking on the If you're a coward. smallest The
519. here to do with you/' will have anything ETHELRED PRESTON. " . to) I don't care:
520. 't touch him — Qw-w! —stop squeezing." They a week strong Earl, Released, Et
521. extraordinary. " Well, good-night," ing on his heel. said Earl shortly, turn- E
522. ay- head, and then, suddenly remembering appointment, hastened away. it All thes
523. professors learned only on the following morning " Well, my son," said Edward, i
524. rs learned only on the following morning " Well, my son," said Edward, it li we
525. private 108 ETHEL RED PRESTON'. sleeping-room for this night. Come on at once, a
526. ce, and don't talk on the way." Crossing the yard, they came to the infirmary bu
527. ard, they came to the infirmary building. It was a long, low structure two stori
528. t nine feet above the ground. Avoid- ing the entrance, Ethelred's guides conduct
529. w do you this?" asked Sullivan, removing the rose-colored shade from the lamp, F
530. you as soon as 109 are to touch nothing in this will room except the lamp, whic
531. till we come for you to- morrow morning/' " Yes, sir," " If any people should c
532. the night, don't you let in here during them impose on you. to However, there d
533. y means window, so as to keep your being here a secret from the boys, many to of
534. e. n Til bet I won't. "They're not going to fool " Good-night, boy. Go to bed."
535. town to see certain returned " carolling lightly," to his room the infirmary. Mr
536. his kindly ways, and, with the trifling exception of one or two upon whom he ha
537. of teacher of flute and piano. Unlocking himself into the lamp, took off his his
538. while It was his custom before retiring to away an hour over a mild Havana. Hav
539. way an hour over a mild Havana. Hav- ing struck a match, and settled into his ar
540. burn away. And while he was thus waiting, his jaw dropped, his eyes opened wide,
541. with a start, two minds about rush- ing from the room. Beside the bed was a cha
542. w —lay a strange head. After breathing hard for a minute, Mr. Hale with trembl
543. rd for a minute, Mr. Hale with trembling fingers struck another match, lighted h
544. ther match, lighted his lamp, and arming himself with his cane, resolved to expl
545. ED PRESTON. chair, Ill bed. and standing at a safe distance from the " Wake up t
546. Hey there! wake up. Do you hear No thing. attention was paid to these remonstran
547. ale did what was for him a bold Stooping down, he picked up a slipper it from un
548. into the air. lightly It fell, striking the sleeper's neck. Ethelred, rubbing h
549. ng the sleeper's neck. Ethelred, rubbing his eyes, sat up in bed. " What are you
550. yes, sat up in bed. " What are you doing stuttered Mr. Hale. in this room, sir ?
551. w," cried Mr. Hale, his if anger growing as his courage rose, " you don't get ou
552. ne you." And he shook his dainty walking-stick at the occupant of his bed. 112 E
553. come near enough/' roared Ethelreaching down and recovering one of his just I'l
554. roared Ethelreaching down and recovering one of his just I'll " You red, shoes,
555. r. Hale that he lunatic. must be dealing with an escaped resolved to change his
556. no professors in the college. answering to such names " Get out," he " Get out
557. " Get out," he " Get out roared, hoping to frighten the invader by the fiercene
558. ce. There had been a noise and pattering of steps outside foot- during the foreg
559. pattering of steps outside foot- during the foregoing voice ceased, dialogue. A
560. steps outside foot- during the foregoing voice ceased, dialogue. As Ethelred's t
561. " bawled Ethelred. to " You're not going here both of you." work me. Get out of
562. barefoot boys. Their eyes were sticking out from curiosity. The new arrivals we
563. w arrivals were not long in appreciating the situation. Mr. Hale, still standing
564. the situation. Mr. Hale, still standing behind his chair, as though cane. it we
565. cane. it were a rampart, was brandishing his Ethelred, sitting up in bed, was ho
566. t, was brandishing his Ethelred, sitting up in bed, was holding a shoe, ready to
567. Ethelred, sitting up in bed, was holding a shoe, ready to throw at a moment's no
568. ntleit's men in white, " mamma's darling." At this all the Ethelred Preston, his
569. thelred. all The five other boys, having been sick that day, had not had the ple
570. not had the pleasure thus far of meeting the Darling. But Haines, during the two
571. pleasure thus far of meeting the Darling. But Haines, during the two hours befor
572. meeting the Darling. But Haines, during the two hours before bedtime, had told
573. orn yesterday." The brother was becoming angry. out, yourself, sir, " Get or we
574. STON. ported you to tl$ me you for being absent, and Fve been looking for since
575. u for being absent, and Fve been looking for since nine o'clock. Ethelred became
576. ray. They disappeared promptly, throwing " Now, I'll wistful, lingering, longing
577. throwing " Now, I'll wistful, lingering, longing looks over their shoulders. si
578. " Now, I'll wistful, lingering, longing looks over their shoulders. sir, put on
579. R PUBLIC ADMONITION, /""\N the following day, Friday in which was the last Janua
580. st He had experi- ences that in entering upon college life he was brought into r
581. row money from every one who was willing to lend, but Devereux and Meriwether, b
582. w-students, satisfied with the preceding day's fun, were content, for the time b
583. 's fun, were content, for the time being, at least, to let him alone. So the mor
584. least, to let him alone. So the morning and afternoon wore off without a break
585. in the calm flow of college life. During the recesses and recreations, Ethelred
586. 117 whom Ethelred cared about consorting with. " You see," he explained, as he g
587. hat he should be put on the same footing with Preston. course, that Preston He k
588. alled him, and awoke him the old feeling of religious unrest. M If you don't lik
589. e fellows in this school who are leading lives as beautiful as the lives of I th
590. all I the time that I've been attending school here, for-nothing fellow yet nev
591. been attending school here, for-nothing fellow yet never met a gooddidn't expla
592. f Il8 ETHELRED PRESTON. spite. I showing jealousy or there are don't believe man
593. d months, and notice that he do anything that he thinks is really wrong, crite."
594. him a pious boy he boy!" "Yes, but going. first I there's not a better He was he
595. vely. Look fun at him now over there ing and tugging, can,' in that crowd. all H
596. un at him now over there ing and tugging, can,' in that crowd. all He's pushthe
597. that crowd. all He's pushthe and getting he I'm afraid you don't know much about
598. een the pious people there. it. Fve ning. seen 'em on the platform and off They
599. nd off They They don't go about laughing and hopping and grin- No, sir, you can
600. They don't go about laughing and hopping and grin- No, sir, you can jest bet yer
601. way, and they are just death on smoking and dancing and amoosements and jokes a
602. ey are just death on smoking and dancing and amoosements and jokes and card-play
603. d amoosements and jokes and card-playing. You can don't catch them playing jokes
604. laying. You can don't catch them playing jokes. tell Why, I a pious feller as so
605. f a man wants it, to be pious, according to your way of seeing to enjoy himself,
606. e pious, according to your way of seeing to enjoy himself, or he have any " Why,
607. olics on that point. A person, according to them, his really pious sin when he d
608. Ethelred snorted. " If there's one thing Earl, I envy the Catholic talking on bo
609. thing Earl, I envy the Catholic talking on boy," continued who was now the subj
610. fession." " What! " squawked the Darling. "It is beautiful to see the effect it
611. l for a few moments, and tell everything that is on their conscience to the prie
612. ' Have you The Horrors of the Confeshing'? " asked Ethelred. " " I don't want to
613. o be hanged. The them fellows pretending they can forgive sins ETHELRED PRESTON.
614. rl, with a his eyes. " there one I thing that has disgusted me with some people
615. to be silenced on course of the of being a As he admitted in the conversation, h
616. he made no pretence at the " professing Christian"; all same of time, he had re
617. read and re-read manner books containing attacks on the Church, and he had, it t
618. him, and despite himself he kept turning them over in his mind. Yet, turn them a
619. themselves. His as his hand was drumming idly upon the desk mind gave of itself
620. h involuntary. " Five lines for drumming, Meriwether," said Mr. Gade. Earl strai
621. s face. The there punishment was nothing extraordinary; were several young gentl
622. gentlemen in the class given to beating the " Devil's tattoo " in season and ou
623. ines to be memorized for each In calling out Earl, Mr. Gade had his used his sev
624. is was the Earl had 1 23 Earl was taking no pains to give satisfaction. first ti
625. to give satisfaction. first time during the year that desk; teacher drummed upo
626. day's and the the light of the preceding occurrence, he entertained a to suspici
627. d a to suspicion that the boy was trying annoy him. Earl was hurt. treat Why cou
628. at motionless; but his blood was boiling. The fierce play of passion within his
629. f passion within his heart was something that terrified him. He all left the cla
630. ie Devereux remained at his desk, making a pretence of arranging his books and p
631. his desk, making a pretence of arranging his books and papers. When all had gone
632. roached Mr. Gade, very nervous. blushing violently and 124 ETHELRED PRESTON. " M
633. " Mr. Gade, you wouldn't mind something, sir all, my saying " ? " Not " - at Ed
634. ldn't mind something, sir all, my saying " ? " Not " - at Eddie. I'm sure that y
635. ie. I'm sure that you won't say anything very bad." It's about Earl, sir." Well,
636. er's face. " I think, sir, he was trying to pay attention the day you sent him f
637. irst came. I He gave me a little talking once because wasn't behaving in chapel,
638. tle talking once because wasn't behaving in chapel, of myself that it and it T m
639. de; I'm sure he troubled about something; wasn't thinking of what he was doing w
640. roubled about something; wasn't thinking of what he was doing when he was drummi
641. ng; wasn't thinking of what he was doing when he was drumming this afternoon." M
642. f what he was doing when he was drumming this afternoon." Mr. Gade was secretly
643. aid in his defence, however, that, owing to Earl's extreme reticence, he had not
644. rl's extreme reticence, he had noth- ing to judge from but the appearance of thi
645. gs. Ed, on the other hand, story, having heard Earl's was sufficiently aware of
646. onvinced of his good faith. Yet, knowing them in confi- dence, he did not feel a
647. ped He went mediator away, then, feeling that his offices as had utterly failed.
648. as had utterly failed. On way dismissing Devereux with a few kind words, Mr. Gad
649. with a few kind words, Mr. Gade, leaving the class-room, took his across the yar
650. ll when he unexpectedly came upon pacing up and down the lonely walk. ; Earl was
651. wn the lonely walk. ; Earl was advancing towards him able. the meeting was inevi
652. advancing towards him able. the meeting was inevitin a state of irres- At first
653. irst Mr. Gade was olution about saluting Earl kindly. There was a stony, repella
654. " Good afternoon, 95 said Earl touching Earl's his in surly tones, cap gingerly
655. n surly tones, cap gingerly, and walking repellant. ill on. manner was harsh and
656. attempt at kindness has gone for nothing. Mr. Gade's " attempt at kindness " may
657. t kindness " may have gone for ; nothing according to the world's meas- urement
658. " may have gone for ; nothing according to the world's meas- urement but accord
659. the world's meas- urement but according to a higher and holier it measurement,
660. urement, had gone for much. In answering thus uncourteously Mr. Gade's ETHELRED
661. r moment, and without It fully realizing what he was doing. his his was only whe
662. out It fully realizing what he was doing. his his was only when he had turned fu
663. en given to return to the former footing with his teacher, even to explain every
664. his teacher, even to explain everything, and he had thrown it away. Earl was th
665. shape, stood between him and the making of a full submission. But in his heart
666. e rope," whispered Ed Devereux, stooping and raising a large from beside the tru
667. spered Ed Devereux, stooping and raising a large from beside the trunk of the tr
668. : the cold had grown more intense during the past twenty-four hours, and the win
669. hours, and the wind which came whistling through the trees set the teeth of the
670. ees set the teeth of the four chattering. " Are you sure that rope will reach al
671. the street/' objected Ethelred, peering over the wall. " Of course there standi
672. ver the wall. " Of course there standing beside him. the town, even if it is," s
673. ad it's better go," urged Earh will ring in a " The few min- bell for the end of
674. end of recess utes; and no use standing here and freezing M to death Ethelred g
675. s; and no use standing here and freezing M to death Ethelred gazed down again. i
676. id Eddie, " we'll give it to for nothing." I " don't care about risking my neck;
677. r nothing." I " don't care about risking my neck; say, just to see Eddie Devereu
678. Eddie Devereux, would you mind climbing down " how it goes ? "Next you. If thin
679. down " how it goes ? "Next you. If thing you'll want me to run away will for you
680. Eddie, coolly, all " Very well, Darling," said " then I'll unfasten this rope,
681. silence, save for the labored breathing of the three boys above, and the noise
682. above, and the noise of shoes scrap- ing and knocking against the stone wall. A
683. e noise of shoes scrap- ing and knocking against the stone wall. A minute passed
684. signal that all was well. it On pulling up the rope, they found that feet of it
685. has no sense Roger Haines was chuckling. " It's one on you, Eddie," he M said a
686. ut you would have this romantic climbing down by The joke's on you. belongs to t
687. 4< said the rueful but lose it's getting found out that bothers privileges for m
688. as been perfectly propen, I In assisting Ethelred to leave, as a benefactor to t
689. oes the Good-night, boys f ears Fm going to take a run; my and toes and hands ar
690. run; my and toes and hands are beginning to freeze." In the dormitory, the prefe
691. of Ethelred, and he darted an inquiring look tion. in Earl's direc- Earl, in co
692. ct came over. Earl, do you know anything about Ethel" ? red Preston " Yes, sir."
693. be on board There's the engine whistling sir, now. He's run away, and I helped h
694. ; which he immediately proved by cutting off as reach. much of the rope as he co
695. the rope as he could f Hurriedly coiling this about his arm it, and wondering wh
696. ing this about his arm it, and wondering what he should do with he ETHELRED PRES
697. only for a collar button! Thus lamenting, Ethelred reached the station. " Evenin
698. Ethelred reached the station. " Evening paper, sir, the Star," cried a tiny you
699. . Hold on, don't go away. ? What evening papers have you got 11 The Star and the
700. d entered the station with three evening papers. for a second class He paid seve
701. e paid seventy cents ticket, and, having twelve minutes to wait, seated himself,
702. seated himself, and took up the evening Star. He had been reading for several m
703. up the evening Star. He had been reading for several minutes, when he suddenly g
704. whistle. With mouth agape and protruding eyes, he read and re-read a certain new
705. e exclaimed, and, into a study. dropping the paper, he An <€ hour later that n
706. do you want now ?" Ethelred was standing in the dimlylighted parlor, fumbling hi
707. ing in the dimlylighted parlor, fumbling his hat. " I've come back/' answered Et
708. ?*' " I'm 11 run away." Yes; but running away here subjects the offender to expu
709. a worthless boy; the reports concerning him from prefects and teachers were to
710. don't me come catch me couched monkeying any more." These words Ethelred, vulgar
711. arned him that the boy meditated running away? The bad points to be looked for i
712. e president that he was length beginning to understand the strange character bef
713. an all the time/' said Ethelred, looking gratified. " Indeed. Well, you must men
714. offence to the boys here I hear anything of the sort again, you shall go at once
715. lishment. As though Now, I shall cursing were write you a note of admission to t
716. d Eddie Devereux, early the next morning, catching Etheired's the wash-room, arm
717. vereux, early the next morning, catching Etheired's the wash-room, arm as the tw
718. mart answer. I " ] you fellows was going to fool you a little bit before I left.
719. say that you got up that plan of running fooling away me and Earl Meriwether jus
720. you got up that plan of running fooling away me and Earl Meriwether just for th
721. your fun out of me, and now I'm getting even with you. You can't fool this chic
722. redit for. I " You may remember, Darling, that lent you seventy-five cents to he
723. t was ?" " Well, just this I'm not going — to spoil the I joke; it's too good.
724. o pay you, but can't." " Your jokes ling. are pretty expensive ones, Dar- No, si
725. protested Ethelred, who was now speaking with extreme animation. Do you mean to
726. d possessed a large store of low cunning. He had it outwitted Devereux; but he h
727. iliar. With a hoarse laugh, and slapping his hand off, over his vest pocket, Eth
728. ver his vest pocket, Ethelred walked ing Devereux quite vexed. leav- But the lit
729. rp eye on the bor- rower. Before morning prayers, accordingly, he sum- moned Ear
730. d them of his interview with the Darling. " He's got the joke on us," I said Ear
731. or sixty cents too." " There's something strange about the whole " It may be tha
732. magnificent actor. Somehow, can't bring myself to believe that he had no intent
733. ieve that he had no intention of running away last night.' " As for me," said it
734. The first I saw of him was this morning, when he jumped out of bed, looking tha
735. ning, when he jumped out of bed, looking that jollier than he has looked since h
736. uspend judgment." just That's what doing," returned Devereux. as I can. feet ask
737. eux. as I can. feet ask " I'm suspending judgment as hard By in the way, Earl, w
738. N. " He asked me whether I knew anything I about Preston's whereabouts, and told
739. n away; and that he was just about going off- in the train which whistling while
740. going off- in the train which whistling while he was speaking to 51 we heard me
741. in which whistling while he was speaking to 51 we heard me." ? Did Mr. Raymond s
742. r. Raymond suspect that you had anything to do with his running away " He didn't
743. you had anything to do with his running away " He didn't ask me whether resolve
744. sk me whether resolved at I had anything to do with it," responded Earl, in a re
745. robe " But didn't you tell him something ? " " Not about you, Ed, or Haines." "
746. " fact is," returned Earl, with blushing " I simply said I had helped Ethelred "
747. too, "added Roger. " Oh, you had nothing particular to do with it, Roger. You pl
748. esponsible one. as And it even supposing you had I much to I I do with as in had
749. er." just at present, and a little thing like that won't change my position one
750. position one way or the At the beginning of morning studies, the vice- president
751. e way or the At the beginning of morning studies, the vice- president entered th
752. a few remarks upon Ethelred's run* ning away and subsequent repentance. He info
753. e informed the boys that Ethelred, owing to a peculiar combination of circumstan
754. am sorry to say that one of the leading boys of the junior division has actuall
755. efrain from that he should is expressing my regret publicly thus lend his counte
756. was at the prefect of dis- room. talking about Earl this morning, of the leading
757. s- room. talking about Earl this morning, of the leading You were Father, when y
758. about Earl this morning, of the leading You were Father, when you spoke boy tha
759. ou spoke boy that had helped the Darling run away." — I mean Ethelred " It —
760. use away; but that it Ethelred's wanting to I I settled the scruple for him. wou
761. e scruple for him. would be a good thing for the college Ethelred were to get ou
762. e whole course, Earl helped, but I thing. leader, 1 45 Of and Last was the Earl
763. d Last was the Earl was simply following my plans. night Eail told the prefect t
764. he story, Eddie; but how could you bring yourself to help a boy run serious matt
765. ow that is a Devereux then explained ing this action, set his reasons for tak- m
766. ever he might think all of the reasoning, he felt sure, at events, that Eai{ and
767. ir consciences. 4 Thank you for speaking to me about this," said Father end. How
768. know that Ethelred off there in helping was nothing of the weakness and human r
769. thelred off there in helping was nothing of the weakness and human respect and d
770. There were reasons But it your thinking so yesterto is well know that Ethelred
771. ime of his entrance till On his reaching the railroad station seems that he ente
772. he came back here, and after apologizing for his previous conduct, presi- he mad
773. much I as possible the misunderstanding of this morning." " All right, Father;
774. ble the misunderstanding of this morning." " All right, Father; left thank you v
775. H7 struck him as a fit theme for smiling that the boy who had made such satisfac
776. actory promises of behavior before going to bed should begin the new day by debt
777. uld begin the new day by debts. ic lying and by repudiating his honest So he did
778. ay by debts. ic lying and by repudiating his honest So he did run away after all
779. . T^DDIE DEVEREUX, red's notwithstanding his doubts concerning the sincerity of
780. 's notwithstanding his doubts concerning the sincerity of Ethelpurpose of amendm
781. self, with will, the best of to carrying out the behest of Father Howard. fellow
782. pon that Ethelred was really leaf, going to turn over a new and pleaded with the
783. leaded with them to give the interesting new-comer another the junior students c
784. de no and at least, difficulty in laying aside their prejudices feelings against
785. to him. " red, I say," he said, seating himself beside Ethel- who was watching
786. g himself beside Ethel- who was watching game of hand-ball, " I say, Darling, th
787. hing game of hand-ball, " I say, Darling, the fellows have been telling me it th
788. , Darling, the fellows have been telling me it that you're going to drop your no
789. ave been telling me it that you're going to drop your nonsense and turn over a I
790. s see, " ? a Well, you any I'm not going to tease you the his more," explained d
791. ore," explained diminutive youth, rising, and standing with I arms akimbo before
792. d diminutive youth, rising, and standing with I arms akimbo before like to Ethel
793. at the amiable urchin, but said nothing. 14 You were mad got at me yesterday, I
794. with the other fellows, and we're going to give you a fair chance." 150 ETHELRE
795. chance or not ?" " You ought to, Darling/' " But I don't/' " That's because you'
796. jokes that the fellows have been getting off on you/' "What not, jokes ? " asked
797. t not, jokes ? " asked Ethelred, raising his Head, and speaking with an animatio
798. Ethelred, raising his Head, and speaking with an animation which had thus far, c
799. . " Oh, any amount —about your running away, just be- you know. cause Some say
800. , while Peter broke into another ringing laugh. u And one of the fellows says th
801. fraid to hang yourself for fear spoiling the rope." " Get away from here, will y
802. voluntarily gave a start but, recovering himself so quickly it, that those about
803. id Earl, kindly, as the two were walking towards the clothes-room, if any little
804. ds the clothes-room, if any little thing I can do for you, just in let T me know
805. on a new-comer here is in the beginning, because he a stranger and often doesn'
806. often doesn't know the ways of boarding-schools." " I guess I can look out for
807. them like to tease. Now, by keepwho ing quiet for a while, you keep these fello
808. se fellows like to tease *' from getting a handle on you, and — You needn't pr
809. edn't preach," interrupted the Dar- ling, in his fascinating croak. Earl colored
810. rupted the Dar- ling, in his fascinating croak. Earl colored. "Oh!" there's he e
811. STON. Ethelred fell l$3 his to rummaging in pockets. Out of one he took a handfu
812. , and I'm afraid the brother has nothing to it open with. I say, Brother John, E
813. " for him, please ? The brother, laying aside some work upon the long table whi
814. n, so absorbed were they it in examining the trunk, noticed how pale Ethelred ha
815. HELRED PRESTON. trunk," said the opening clothes-keeper; " the lock not an ordin
816. t I it inside of days. While I'm waiting reckon Meriwether can lend as I me some
817. ," said Earl, heroically. He was forcing himself to remember, poor boy, that Eth
818. now and and appreciate struggles feeling sentiment which he was making for love
819. es feeling sentiment which he was making for love of her. " Lend me a few and a
820. eater. The boy had passion for borrowing. During study-hours that day, Ethelred
821. he boy had passion for borrowing. During study-hours that day, Ethelred was ETHE
822. als for play 1 55 observed to be writing a great deal; and in the and the recess
823. hortly before supper, " that the Darling is up to some new mischief. Somehow, I
824. ief. Somehow, I can't help sure, keeping my eyes on him. You may be he wasn't ta
825. yes on him. You may be he wasn't talking to that day-scholar for nothing. I'm no
826. talking to that day-scholar for nothing. I'm not quite certain yet, but I'm wil
827. m not quite certain yet, but I'm willing to bet that he gave letters, to him a l
828. me the whole time, and abused everything Catholic. He's got the idea into his he
829. d! 156 ETHELRED PRESTON. I that am being hoodwinked by the people here; to put t
830. put the Catholic it. and so he's trying before Church a night- me as he sees ma
831. y knew the I effect that his talk having on me, think he would leave the Catholi
832. onfessional, Eddie started on perceiving Earl Meriwether. One by one, in regular
833. of the first to make his confession, ing took a place where he could keep his ey
834. nder whether he might be is really going in," mused Eddie, and he prayed again a
835. e chapel, glance. It he gave his waiting friend a quick Eddie read the meaning o
836. ng friend a quick Eddie read the meaning of that glance. meant: " Wait forme; I
837. e. meant: " Wait forme; I have something to you." tell A the few minutes passed
838. d that ; didn't care about I felt making a confession but that troubled a great
839. ittle; that is, I gave him a general ing idea of the things that were botherthat
840. er with him at greater length. I'm going; but honestly, Eddie, I'm awfully upset
841. keep myself to myself I and, if anything, have carried it too far. But now I'm g
842. ve carried it too far. But now I'm going to ; try and open my heart for once I f
843. me, Eddie; for that there's some- thing serious about the present state of affa
844. be for better or for worse. the jumping off place." " You may rely on it, I'll
845. orry, you'll have no trouble in talk ing to Father Noland. He has been dealing t
846. ng to Father Noland. He has been dealing tell with boys all his life, and nothin
847. tell with boys all his life, and nothing you can him " will astonish I him in th
848. even kinder than he looks, which saying a great deal. I'm going to Father How-
849. ks, which saying a great deal. I'm going to Father How- ard now to get permissio
850. e Father first Noland in his room during hour of studies." it Despite these word
851. said Father Noland, breviary, and laying aside his glasses and pointing to a sea
852. nd laying aside his glasses and pointing to a seat beside him. "You are wel- com
853. eliant. You want to fight out everything by yourself." " I believe so, Father."
854. est of us to take counsel. As the saying that is not true, in in his —a saying
855. that is not true, in in his —a saying, of course, many cases— no man a is '
856. .' " "Yes, Father; out. I am I beginning to find that it am very proud, and hurt
857. me to talk of my troubles. But am going to talk about I them now; and speak of
858. ent. "Well, Earl," he said, "is it owing to these class-room troubles alone that
859. o, besides; sir; it is there's something far more serious I the question of reli
860. n. But then, on the other hand, worrying my science is me a great deal, and insi
861. hen —never even Up to think of joining the I Catholic Church. to that time, ha
862. hurch. to that time, had been I doubting, and didn't know my own mind. it did no
863. s been removed and the now the one thing that holds I me back is promise which m
864. ndeed " exclaimed Father Noland, opening his eyes. "Why, is I was under the impr
865. ose only practices consist in ridiculing, and abusing, and lying about Catholics
866. tices consist in ridiculing, and abusing, and lying about Catholics, and in tell
867. st in ridiculing, and abusing, and lying about Catholics, and in telling bug-a-b
868. nd lying about Catholics, and in telling bug-a-boo stories of priests and nuns a
869. ely and then began to see that something else was necessary besides I good have
870. x or seven months, my have been teaching Scripture text, i me the meaning of hea
871. eaching Scripture text, i me the meaning of heaven it that the kingdom taken by
872. er Noland. " put in I have been watching your course with interest ever since yo
873. d it has long been my you on your coming going to turn out, bad, my opinion that
874. as long been my you on your coming going to turn out, bad, my opinion that you a
875. the is watchmaker, and while he telling what he knows about into the it, the wa
876. e bound to secrecy in this on everything that takes place between us talk." " I
877. o say ; it, for I hate to say anyI thing against any boy if I but can't keep it
878. ny one here can see oi it, without being told that Ethelred to get such is not a
879. his mother a lady. is But besides being rude and boorish, he vile things. a bad
880. gs, and doesn't seem to know the meaning of self-restraint. noticing this, I as
881. the meaning of self-restraint. noticing this, I as I got to began to think I wh
882. me. wasn't afraid, Father, of be; coming rude and boorish could ever fall I don'
883. er's memory and my I if college training upon me, it as to lose all sense of dec
884. world generally stay, and you are trying to look at your position from God's sta
885. t. a great horror of sin, and everything have heard here has helped to keep me a
886. son, that he got ligion. I me to arguing with him about re- He spoke so bitterly
887. I doctrines of the couldn't help trying to answer seems he has read a lot of bo
888. olic Church. In the long run, my reading and thinking and arguing made things so
889. In the long run, my reading and thinking and arguing made things so clear to me
890. run, my reading and thinking and arguing made things so clear to me that is I no
891. ver you to object to your sir." becoming a Catholic?" Father Noland paused for a
892. N. to you, Earl, that she is 169 keeping watch and ward boy, believe, as I over
893. e his in. He was quite right in thinking duty to call you to account." sir." " P
894. ear your 170 ETHELRED PRESTON. According to your own heart on your sleeve. accou
895. fallible. Only to all read the According appearances, his action was fully warra
896. was fully warranted. He acted according to his best judgment, whereas your cond
897. to me so kindly was rude. I'm beginning to be more and more ashamed of myself."
898. our heart in you can fancy her answering but one way. will I And your to your mo
899. nt, one should be contented with nothing less than certainty ; so it would be go
900. pray, your mother €t heaven is praying with you." I will Thank you very much,
901. w himself on nis knees before a painting of the After a little, Good Shep- herd.
902. his life Earl love found himself raising his troubled heart in and confidence to
903. eet intercession never fails of bringing relief. I?3 ETHELRED PRESTON. CHAPTER X
904. . CHAPTER XV. AND ' IN WHICH THE DARLING GOES INTO BUSINESS* THE MIDGETS INTO BA
905. the afternoon. cheerful, Earl? following Sunday M I've had a talk with Mr. Gade;
906. with Mr. Gade; and now is all everything right between us. I wanted to apologize
907. f it. He says if there's any apologizing to be done, he'll do it himself. Then I
908. to me I all his reasons for ob- jecting to my conduct, felt that I had laid myi
909. felt that I had laid myin- open to being misunderstood, and that stead of being
910. g misunderstood, and that stead of being too hard he had been too easy on me." "
911. to him, though," continued Earl. gizing in natural. "I haven't done much and it
912. doesn't seem to I come talk Last evening, after had that ETHELRED FAESTON. with
913. d have to go and pray for one more thing to her again." 'm going to pray "You I
914. r one more thing to her again." 'm going to pray "You I needn't it. tell me what
915. Eddie. can guess There's only one thing I'd like to suggest." "What is that?" E
916. and giggled: all but for their laughing and giggling, one could see that in the
917. all but for their laughing and giggling, one could see that in the hearts of ea
918. hat may come." Eddie cheerfully. Darling " Surer than Christmas," said " Halloa!
919. alloa! there's our dear Mamma's tackling a small boy." They had turned building,
920. g a small boy." They had turned building, the corner of the class-room and come
921. ie Reardon by name. Ethelred was holding by the great coat, and speaking, appare
922. holding by the great coat, and speaking, apparently, with earnestness. On catch
923. pparently, with earnestness. On catching sight of 174 ETHELRED PRESTON. did not
924. eye of Devereux. "Was "Yes. the Darling trying to sell you some- thing, Willie?
925. Devereux. "Was "Yes. the Darling trying to sell you some- thing, Willie?" He ha
926. e Darling trying to sell you some- thing, Willie?" He had it a silver watch chai
927. a fellow he is." " But wasn't he trying to get something out of you else when w
928. " But wasn't he trying to get something out of you else when we came round offe
929. ." cried "Oho!' Eddie, his eyes snapping, "now I'm beginning to understand. Did
930. e, his eyes snapping, "now I'm beginning to understand. Did you notice, Earl, th
931. . Did you notice, Earl, that the Darling has been holding confidential talks wit
932. Earl, that the Darling has been holding confidential talks with nearly every li
933. rike me that he has been up to something.' " Up to something!" repeated Eddie. "
934. been up to something.' " Up to something!" repeated Eddie. " It's quite clear wh
935. e, and the way the pies went ? And being a Sun- day — five days since the fell
936. oys were hungry and hard up this morning, and he's been lending them twenty cent
937. d up this morning, and he's been lending them twenty cents or so, provided they
938. Earl, indignantly. "I'll stop that thing right now, even If if I have to pay the
939. e extra money myself. I there's anything hate, it is imposing on a as selfish as
940. I there's anything hate, it is imposing on a as selfish as little boy« it, Why
941. id Eddie, "No you don't, Earl," catching 176 ETHELRED PRESTON. friend it his ind
942. e talked over. think see a way of fixing the matter without any trouble. will Th
943. e. will There's no use well. in fighting when iun answer just as Now I look here
944. s are, don't you?'' see that the Darling has been working us little boys for all
945. '' see that the Darling has been working us little boys for all we're worth," an
946. each." " Well," whispered Eddie, poking finger into Willie's face, his index "I
947. d Roger, and you'll turn that everything will out all right. Now, you'll keep qu
948. asurer's room. the They entered giggling, in, and even after door had closed the
949. ter door had closed them any one passing along the corridor could hear now and t
950. ong with boys; He self, had been dealing and having been, so rumor ran, a harum-
951. ys; He self, had been dealing and having been, so rumor ran, a harum-scarum him-
952. uld sympathize with wild boys, and being a man of tender heart and generous sent
953. ally at all odd moments on the following day, Devereux, nevertheless, contrived
954. . There was an air of restless- behaving strangely. ness about him. He held two
955. ith Farwell, the day-scholar, and during the second received from him a letter.
956. and he felt almost sure that some- thing was wrong. Had he but seen the address
957. he strongest confirmation. " I'm willing to bet the money that I lent the is Dar
958. bet the money that I lent the is Darling against to run five cents that Ethelred
959. st to run five cents that Ethelred going away again," he he'll said to his " Oh,
960. Earl. ( would be no sense first running away after that attempt of did he his.
961. There's no sense If you go to reasoning about " But all it, you have me," answe
962. all it, you have me," answered Ed. going to go, the same, he's —and soon too.
963. and soon too. He has been getright ting things together, left, and borrowing an
964. ing things together, left, and borrowing and and he's been studying up the best
965. and borrowing and and he's been studying up the best way to get out of here. it.
966. N. little 179 before dinner this morning, and he seemed very much interested in
967. Then I asked him whether he was thinking again, and he began to protest of runni
968. gain, and he began to protest of running away most eagerly that so, till I he ha
969. had not the shut least thought of doing occur to him up. It didn't me then that
970. didn't me then that ; there was anything back of his eagerness that but now you
971. ar," put in Roger, " that if the Darling intends running away again, he's not go
972. r, " that if the Darling intends running away again, he's not going to publish i
973. tends running away again, he's not going to publish it on the house-tops." it,"
974. go lent. is minus all the money he thing that To-morrow he collects every- due h
975. So ETHELRED PRESTON. he counts on making nearly two dollars on hfe various loans
976. ns." " He has a lot of clothes belonging to me," added " of Earl. And And he bor
977. little Well," he continued, " everything fixed for to-morrow morning, day, I bel
978. " everything fixed for to-morrow morning, day, I believe. And during the we can
979. rrow morning, day, I believe. And during the we can study up here. Ethelred's pl
980. dy up here. Ethelred's plans for getting afraid," he added, as the I'll away fro
981. han lessons to-night. stay here standing. alive till If he were to much longer,
982. boys. Just try to keep to-morrow morning.' And indeed they were very much alive,
983. small yard took part in that scampering, each one endeavoring to get a position
984. in that scampering, each one endeavoring to get a position nearest the treasurer
985. s room. Within two minutes after leaving all the refectory, the junior students
986. THELRED PRESTON. up in line, l8l pushing and tugging and pinching and sparring,
987. TON. up in line, l8l pushing and tugging and pinching and sparring, after the ma
988. ne, l8l pushing and tugging and pinching and sparring, after the manner of their
989. ng and tugging and pinching and sparring, after the manner of their kind. The fi
990. he line anticipated him vio- by reaching forward, and giving the door a blow wit
991. him vio- by reaching forward, and giving the door a blow with his clinched fist.
992. hen slipped back into his place, leaving Eddie to take the consequences. The pus
993. ie to take the consequences. The pushing and tugging and all ceased like magic a
994. he consequences. The pushing and tugging and all ceased like magic awaited in ex
995. lred, who stood at the very end, keeping watch upon the door which led to the ya
996. rer's face. What do you mean by knocking much It that way on my door, with Eddie
997. ou boys want time of the Tuesday morning, Father," exclaimed Pete Lane, who was
998. "Not to-day," said Father Harter. "Owing to certain circumstances, none of you e
999. et one cent of pocket-money this morning." And Father Some were in Harter steppe
1000.own pale, and his fingers were clutching the lapels of his coat. tense excitemen
1001."These fellows," said Ethelred, pointing out the eleven midgets of the yard. Whi
1002.dgets of the yard. While he was pointing out slipped over to his debtors Roger E
1003. I I S3 catch the idea, too. — Darling," much snarled if he added aloud, " I'd
1004.here were eleven pairs of eyes sparkling as one. " Line up," with clenched yelle
1005.up," with clenched yelled Peter, falling back nine ot ten yards from the spot wh
1006.aped body of boys shot towards detaching himself from right Ethelred, while Pete
1007.ed, while Peter, the mass, came tripping quietly about the end. Ethelred did not
1008.is eyes were fixed on the wedge. putting his With like a bellow, and head down a
1009.es three forward towards the approaching his foot mass. While was still raised f
1010. himself straight at his knees, plunging forward as a diver plunges into the wat
1011. ; and fear- the secret of good tackling. In an instant the two were left, rolli
1012.In an instant the two were left, rolling upon the ground, Peter to the the Darli
1013.pon the ground, Peter to the the Darling to the right, while between them with a
1014.right, while between them with a ringing hurrah moved the wedge out through the
1015. the yard, while the boys within looking on, forgetting the rules of the corrido
1016.e the boys within looking on, forgetting the rules of the corridor, broke into t
1017. of several yards by the furious Darling. cried "Are you hurt?" one of Ethelred'
1018. Ethelred's arms. let Devereux, catching "Just me dust you,*' said Roger, catchi
1019.Just me dust you,*' said Roger, catching the other. "We'll all dust you," put in
1020.ir hands as could come into play beating upon his clothes. A door opened at the
1021. back into the yard. 11 too bad, Darling," said Devereux, link- ing his arm with
1022. bad, Darling," said Devereux, link- ing his arm with Ethelred 's, while the oth
1023. ?" fi Yes; and I insist on their paying." " How much do they owe you? u Four do
1024.owe," " And you I insist on their paying to-day? " Yes, fore ni do; I've got to
1025.you." "Midgets ahoy!" called Ed, leaving the Darling disconsolate upon a bench.
1026.ts ahoy!" called Ed, leaving the Darling disconsolate upon a bench. The midg- 1
1027.PRESTON. to a ets man came will flocking about Devereux. They * scented fun from
1028.ented fun from afar. 'There be a meeting of the people who are in debt to Ethelr
1029. is made for the play-room. 'The meeting called to order," said Ed presently, wi
1030.ravity. " Johnnie Mar- take that chewing gum out of your mouth. sit Albert Winsl
1031.hile I read this paper/' " The following boys have promised to pa}' : me the fol
1032.have promised to pa}' : me the following amounts on Tuesday morning Peter Lane.
1033.the following amounts on Tuesday morning Peter Lane. William Reardon Albert Wins
1034.at all right ? " inquired Eddie, raising his eyes from the paper. Each of the mi
1035. answered affirmatively. " And according to the agreement you are all bound to p
1036.. "All right," "How Eddie. are you going to do " it ? "Let me and can't do expla
1037.o me." Peter found a penny in the lining of his coat, put it in his hat, and the
1038. coat, put it in his hat, and then going around, gathered " Boys, will in the sm
1039.he dollar; is, those who owe the Darling cents, fifty cents will satisfy by payi
1040.ents, fifty cents will satisfy by paying four and those who owe twenty-five cent
1041. his note-book, and made a calcu- paying two cents." He lation. li At that rate
1042.er 189 thirty-six ?" you pay the Darling those we don't owe him anything more le
1043. Darling those we don't owe him anything more let " Not exactly; only don't joke
1044. and try to up accounts with the Darling," continued Eddie. He arose, and follow
1045." "they have appointed me "Are you going to pay me my money?" eagerness. receive
1046.r-hearted boy, and could tears. anything but He paused to think. The joke was to
1047.eux had ETHELRED PRESTON. intended going 191 much further; but he could not do a
1048.rther; but he could not do a cruel thing. "Oh, well, Preston, " he said, " you'l
1049.y, the its "you deserve a good trouncing, every one of you." "That's ly, so, Fat
1050.Father," said Peter Lane sweet- catching one end of Father Harter's cincture, wh
1051. small boy. "You needn't think I'm going to give you 192 ETHELRED PRESTON. I any
1052.lips. Again there was a slight twitching at the The boys began to smile sweetly.
1053.ffective accompaniment. deal of laughing choruses By the way, what a we have bee
1054.STON. 193 to chronicle since the opening of this modest story. " How much are yo
1055.s modest story. " How much are you going to give us, Father? Let's have our twen
1056.ve cents just the same as though nothing had happened," pursued Meade. There was
1057.Meade. There was a great deal of arguing before question had been settled. this
1058.his Finally the midgets departed smiling and radiant, each one short just five c
1059.r Father Harter as a weak man in dealing with the stu- In this they will agree w
1060."Because, Father," answered Earl, taking a chair which the Father motioned diffi
1061.elt me I to be a Catholic. After praying almost certain that It it was my duty t
1062.while I was a baby to see to my It being baptized by a after Lutheran clergyman.
1063.er recov- The nurse started father bring me to the church; my met her on the way
1064. her on the way, and bribed her to bring me I back and pretend that I had been b
1065.ther appears that he I I neglected doing so. a Lutheran. So, Father, it! I am no
1066.wered on the ETHELRED PRESTON. receiving it. 197 She writes that the thing has b
1067.eiving it. 197 She writes that the thing has been since. on her conscience ever
1068.ince. on her conscience ever says, being a Catholic, My father, she wanted me to
1069.t the time, but he kept it He on putting done. off and off till finally nothing
1070.g done. off and off till finally nothing was me. once. You can imagine how the l
1071.gine how the letter surprised On reading it, every doubt was gone at My mother h
1072.ou after Mass, and then get ready during that and the next day, you may Communio
1073.ut ? what has happened Wednesday morning but as regards anything that occurred b
1074.ednesday morning but as regards anything that occurred before your ETHELRED PRE
1075.e; I me," he all said. (t Of was willing to it the sins of my I but seemed such
1076.n was afraid I might leave out something important. so nice and easy. But now it
1077.ews iound, and went many warm and loving hearts rejoiced that the hero of the ya
1078.ater on in the after- noon, "we're going to have some great fun tonight ; but it
1079. out of It's " Have you learned anything more ? "Yes; well that a great deal. On
1080.the little little boys heard the Darling telling that all wretch Farhis was fixe
1081.le little boys heard the Darling telling that all wretch Farhis was fixed, and t
1082.ed, and that he saw way clear to getting away. Other fellows saw Ethel- red stea
1083.oom his empty, and he has been arranging desk in the study-hall.* " So he goes t
1084.," and all he'll this time, bet anything he'll not I come back. to have But the
1085.eady your baptism and to- morrow morning, I shall if things go the tell way I ex
1086.RESTON. 201 CHAPTER IN WHICH THE DARLING RUNS XVII. AWAY IN GOOD EARNEST; the "1
1087.ich had been sensitive to the scratching of a pen, was broken of desks, in by th
1088. was broken of desks, in by the shutting of books, the slamming the shifting of
1089.n by the shutting of books, the slamming the shifting of chairs and of feet; and
1090.ting of books, the slamming the shifting of chairs and of feet; and a moment gla
1091.rture. His footfalls were still sounding upon the pavement outside, when a head
1092.Preston, awoke to sudden activity. Going to certain desks, he helped himself hur
1093.the play- ground and leaped out. Pausing for a short time to assure himself that
1094.the shadows he in could see them running about the moonlight. The prefects satis
1095.yes, but at factory distances. Crouching at the gate, the amiable Ethelred shook
1096. grunted, and as he reached the retiring into its of the line of maples, shadow
1097.ot sensi- ble to the cold as yet. Having regained his breath, he started down th
1098.reath, he started down the road, keeping to the side where the shadows lay thick
1099.ESTON of the way. stirred ; 203 throwing a ghastly white light upon the middle T
1100.d hear his frightened him. own breathing, and it He still, stopped once more to
1101.ice. I won't stop any more." And walking swiftly, he made towards a clump of tre
1102.under- *©4 ETHEL RED P'RES TOW. Pushing through the weeds, an old stump standin
1103.through the weeds, an old stump standing out ; brush were reached. Ethelred made
1104.y in the light his hands, and scattering aside, with some dried twigs and leaves
1105.eins, and there was a horrible, stinging sensation about the roots of his hair.
1106.the pistol hip, at and the other holding a the unhappy youth. No don t wonder he
1107. those figures would move or cough thing rather than the silence and pistols. It
1108.red's overaside, then his vest. Stepping he re- turned with other clothes upon h
1109.. These he handed to Ethelred, motioning him to put them on. fingers, With tremb
1110. to put them on. fingers, With trembling Ethelred and breathing heavily, to put
1111.s, With trembling Ethelred and breathing heavily, to put made an endeavor on the
1112.pen his mouth! He was But to suffocating — he could not even swallow. The sile
1113.t over Ethelred's shoulders, and placing the vest and coat upon one of the nerve
1114.re came behind lent him a loud deafening explosion which winged speed. In the ti
1115.ell," exclaimed the his leader, throwing face of off mask and revealing the merr
1116. throwing face of off mask and revealing the merry ! 5 Ed Devereux "wasn't it a
1117. "wasn't it a grand success?" " Stunning!' said Roger Haines, removing his weird
1118." Stunning!' said Roger Haines, removing his weird, conical cap. " If he runs th
1119.done a great night's work. red was going to run knew that Ethel- away in Earl Me
1120.here ; but I didn't think he I was going to rob right and left. could hardly kee
1121.nd left. could hardly keep from I saying something when took my own fountain pen
1122.ould hardly keep from I saying something when took my own fountain pen and pocke
1123.of his "And out gift I felt like putting in an oar," broke in the fourth highway
1124.you brought a birthday my box of writing paper; it was from my aunt, and each sh
1125.it." The boys meanwhile had been doffing their weird attire, and now stood revea
1126.-thief, they agreed, and the frightening light which he had received was a very
1127.hment. And then the romance of the thing! Pistols! Moonlight! Playing at highway
1128.f the thing! Pistols! Moonlight! Playing at highwaymen! pistols, —they ! were
1129. night was a real adventure, some- thing that could be talked about and laughed
1130.rer years as one of the most interesting experiences of their college life. " Wa
1131. " It sounded like a cannon. The Darling gave went off, ! a leap into the air ju
1132. him that there I felt was some thieving going I on, and that sure could stop it
1133.hat there I felt was some thieving going I on, and that sure could stop it, if h
1134. repeated Father Yes his mamma's darling! " Howard. — " And where is Ethelred?
1135. " I think he's on the train by to bring this time, in an old overcoat, and with
1136.with just about money enough mind taking him home. We it didn't everything of va
1137.taking him home. We it didn't everything of value he had, pretty sure that most
1138.terest and delight. "When I hear a thing like that," said the *io ETHELRED PREST
1139. recital, " can hardly keep from wishing I was a boy again. to- Now you may all
1140.o the infirmary, and late morrow morning take a had a great deal of fun sleep. Y
1141. valise, soliloquized the Father, gazing at the initials which bore the is of Pe
1142., 211 CHAPTER XVIII. A MEMORABLE MORNING, C\& the following day, while the stude
1143.. A MEMORABLE MORNING, C\& the following day, while the students oi Henryton Col
1144.en Father Noland poured the regenerating water upon his head, and pronounced in
1145.s the sacramental words, Earl, realizing the beauty of the garment his self invi
1146. was the second time since that entering college Devereux had seen Earl weep. Fi
1147.ect chalice, and three splendid blushing neophyte. roses blushed before the Arou
1148.ings, upon the departed left it. Darling, and once upon that topic, never " Just
1149. came here yet, last it Thursday morning —not quite a week and seems as though
1150.Roger. "That's so," assented Ed. getting awfully dull "Things were along. when h
1151.en, only he came along I for the Darling. I When was so dead that was thinking o
1152.ng. I When was so dead that was thinking of But since that applying for a burial
1153. was thinking of But since that applying for a burial permit. time everything ha
1154.ing for a burial permit. time everything has been on the go." "Very much the day
1155.you, in Ed. I Mr. Gade gave me something near forgetting all and came about it."
1156.. Gade gave me something near forgetting all and came about it." Eddie pulled ou
1157.. Earl, before for you, Earl?'* replying, ran his eyes over the manuscript. "Yes
1158.PRESTON. I wanted him to write something me lately, and he answered by quoting a
1159.ng me lately, and he answered by quoting a few lines from a young Englishman nam
1160.losed it Not mine the rich and showering hand, The facile largess of a stintless
1161.trews A fitful presence, seldom tarrying long, Capriciously she touches me to so
1162.. Gade's verses are well worthy of being treasured. Probably, the older you grow
1163.fter a Ethelred's trouble in the morning, ; we had boxing match at noon and then
1164. trouble in the morning, ; we had boxing match at noon and then Ethelred passes
1165.p serenely in the dormitory next morning, and at studies is introduced to us as
1166.or; it's to. But first there's one thing the time since I've been in here that I
1167.a student who was a thief. so disgusting to live near I such a fellow. Last nigh
1168. a fellow. Last night when was searching him, and pulling out things that belong
1169.ight when was searching him, and pulling out things that belonged to the boys I
1170.ys I knew, I felt very much like setting the whole crowd on him to give him a po
1171.hole crowd on him to give him a pounding; I'm very glad I didn't yield. It would
1172." By the way, Earl," said Eddie, helping him* self to another biscuit, " the Dar
1173.* self to another biscuit, " the Darling went off in your overcoat, coat, and ve
1174. I lent him the other things, and taking them. take But am not surprised at his
1175.ad no sense of gratitude Haines, putting at all," Roger down his and " Why, just
1176.ith Earl Meriwether! Earl has been doing everyfeel at thing to clothes, make him
1177.! Earl has been doing everyfeel at thing to clothes, make him home. He lent him
1178.the other boys fought shy last The thing in return for all this is that the Darl
1179.rn for all this is that the DarlIt's ing makes off with his overcoat. disgusting
1180. makes off with his overcoat. disgusting. I downright didn't think there were an
1181.accounted by a passion for money-getting. People who allow the love of money to
1182.ETHELRED upon them, soon come everything else. PRESTON'. 21} to lose their love
1183.w! " said him, when Earl. We are abusing we ought v\ to pity him. He was an unha
1184.table comment, Earl rose, and forgetting Ethelred on the moment, put himself to
1185. on the moment, put himself to preparing for the first Friday. 2l8 ETHELRED PRES
1186. was the noon recess on Thursday morning. The the small boys, with the exception
1187.s, were all gathered together discussing of disappearance Ethelred Preston, and
1188.pearance Ethelred Preston, and examining the various articles, just restored to
1189.just restored to them, which the Darling had attempted to run away with. " Hallo
1190.s Earl Meriwether, and there's something queer about his face." " He looks puzzl
1191.ace." " He looks puzzled, and he's going to said tell us some news," eyed. Johnn
1192. haven't seen Ethelred yet. But laughing. now met Father Howard, and he was I do
1193. was I don't see yet why he was laughing. tell He contrived to fifteen minutes a
1194.s the entrance to the residence building. steps stood Father There at the top of
1195.re at the top of the Howard, and holding the Father's hand in his own, a very sm
1196.r took off his sailor cap, and, exposing a sunny head of ringlets, gravely, he w
1197.head of ringlets, gravely, he was facing such a staring, bowed stupid, wondering
1198.s, gravely, he was facing such a staring, bowed stupid, wondering, figures as op
1199. such a staring, bowed stupid, wondering, figures as open-mouthed crowd of petri
1200.ovement spoke Earl was the first Running " ? up the steps, he took the new-comer
1201.a bow. " Three cheers for Mamma's flying Darling, " crier* Peter Lane, the small
1202. Three cheers for Mamma's flying Darling, " crier* Peter Lane, the small boy wit
1203.le air till little Ethelred was blushing like a rose. Father Howard meanwhile wa
1204.. Father Howard meanwhile was whispering Earl's ear. assent, in Earl's face ligh
1205.ton, you've got a nickname. It's Darling. How if do you like that nickname " lik
1206.arrative, will be set down the following chapters* ETHELRED PRESTON* 22$ CHAPTER
1207.RYTON M DUE when TT was a chilly morning, late in January, a closed carriage dro
1208.golden, ambrosial curls the constraining influ- ence of the crimping irons; ther
1209.constraining influ- ence of the crimping irons; there were shining buckles upon
1210.f the crimping irons; there were shining buckles upon his low shoes, the largene
1211.es, the largeness of the buckles forcing into notice the smallness of his feet,
1212.complete all resemblance to that darling of mothers and most — Little Lord Fau
1213.hat eyes, and had evidently been weeping. The *24 ETHELRED PRESTON, lips boy, wi
1214.y, with compressed held his and frowning brow, ground. face towards the He was c
1215.t- He looked up and saw the love shining other face. Mamma," he cried, "please t
1216.walked into the deserted ladies' waiting-room; " your delicate constitution coul
1217.not And income. You far know, my darling, that I shall miss will you more than y
1218.f together and added, " Make the parting easy for your mother, my only child." t
1219.ck. " But don't want to go to a boarding-school, are are ma; the boys so rough,
1220. dear, that will like where he attending; and you only put on a brave face, you
1221. " But, » mamma," his Ethelred, putting his I arm about you. mother, " can't be
1222.mother, " can't bear to leave Forgetting the time and place, Mrs. Preston threw
1223.e had wiped " Well, mamma, " You darling! M and she fell his eyes, the I'll pout
1224.." cried the delighted mother, to gazing upon the pretty, somewhat effeminate fe
1225." Take one at once; the early is morning I air is sharp, and your cold not quite
1226.e sure and take it regularly, my darling. Oh, dear! how shall time flies —only
1227.ryton at nine o'clock this dear; morning. Go direct to the college, and don't sp
1228.o say that Ethelred, who was some- thing of a spoiled boy, took these prohibitio
1229. circumstances. The fond mother, fearing neglect some of her many the ear of the
1230.a last kiss, and presently stood weeping train and alone while the moved away. a
1231.ile the moved away. a conductor watching If Ethelred as he entered the sleeping-
1232.g If Ethelred as he entered the sleeping-car was in a bad mood. To have his over
1233.could hardly have Ethelred was something of varied her requests. baby" in the sm
1234.small boy's sense of the word, ind being a baby, course far he resented his moth
1235.with a literalness that was most galling to the spoiled child. He own repeated M
1236. within range of the small boy's burning ears. Ethelred was at one and Fifteen t
1237. say, young feller," Bl he said, seating him- beside the little lad, I'd like to
1238.I'd like to show ycu spoke, he something that you want/' As he uncovered his tra
1239.And with considerable enthusiasm shining from his eyes, the strange boy dangled
1240.e way they elastic; They're just running over with and they'll last you till you
1241. PRESTON. a feller your size not wearing sus- " What! penders! a baby. You ought
1242.hat old school." " What school you going to *' " ? Henryton all College. life,"
1243.yton all College. life," I've been going to school my continued Ethelred with a
1244.f it; and besides don't care about going to an old boarding college." " I wish I
1245.on't care about going to an old boarding college." " I wish I I had your chance,
1246.ol than peddle suspenders," " A boarding-school is a penitentiary/' added Ethelr
1247.n't want suspenders." a feint of putting then The peddler »made away. He paused
1248. put dollar, aside his box, and hav- ing carefully examined the silver quarter o
1249.d Preston." " Was you ever at a boarding-school before? M 11 No." 232 ETHELRED P
1250. ? " Yes, indeed; I'd rather do anything." Packy fell into a study. " I'll tell
1251.I'd like to see what a boardis like. ing-school Suppose we change places/ 1 " Oh
1252.v/hat you said then ' ? You were telling lies. " No, I wasn't. You were just a-b
1253. " No, I wasn't. You were just a-blowing. But we can't change places Besides, wi
1254.n't change places Besides, without being found out. even if I it didn't care abo
1255.ut. even if I it didn't care about going to boarding-school, doesn't follow that
1256.I it didn't care about going to boarding-school, doesn't follow that I feel like
1257. doesn't follow that I feel like running away." M Didn't you say was never jest
1258.jest a minute ago that you at a boarding-school in your life P " "Yes." " Then t
1259.eak. he contented himself with answering: So " two ; It would be all right, perh
1260.t after a while that there was something wrong. You couldn't use my clothes, and
1261.rboe here made a digression, inquir- ing into the price of Ethelred's shoes, and
1262.ace for a day or so only without getting found out." " Yes; and I'm sure '* it i
1263.hance to see worked. I'll how a boarding-school I'll let you have my my peddler'
1264. Ethelred could not refrain from showing some pleasure at this last inducement.
1265.And then," it continued the enterprising Packy, " college will be such a joke. Y
1266. a joke. You come to on Saturday morning, and when the boys learn how you've foo
1267.fraid," answered Ethelred, with flashing eyes, " only I don't care about trying
1268.g eyes, " only I don't care about trying that plan." " You are a coward, and you
1269.ell, ton, far of all, instead of getting off at HenryCollinsville, you get off a
1270.s far as my ticket goes. in This morning and this afternoon you take Collinsvill
1271. walk." miles! " cried Ethelred, opening his hands. Walk seven Yes, of his eyes
1272.lk seven Yes, of his eyes ** and holding up course. You're not a baby. railroad
1273. baby. railroad There's no way of riding there. doesn't run through hire a kerri
1274.ll continued frightened; Packy, noticing Ethelred was 44 it's only about four. I
1275. there's a sort of hotel the first thing you come to as you kept by an uncle of
1276.nd supper and breakfast the next morning cheap. Then you Next left all go round
1277.tay that night my uncle's again. morning, you leave the suspenders that are over
1278.ow part." my " They*!! suspect something when you get to the college, because th
1279.he president sees know there's something wrong. " Don't you see any way of my ge
1280.g. " Don't you see any way of my getting over that ? " asked Packy, anxiously. 1
1281.hil- you look though you've been growing lately." " That's so! that." I think I
1282.ofit out of the Packy counted on finding two days at Henryton. At the very worst
1283.ve to be none the poorer regular calling. two days away from his The two then fe
1284. from his The two then fell to comparing notes. Ethel- red told Packy about his
1285.Meriwether, and crammed the enterprising peddler for his new role. He gave him a
1286.He gave him a few of his letter visiting-cards, and provided him with the of rec
1287.cky Jarboe furnished Ethelred explaining very carefully, as he with a did so, pr
1288.. He also wrote out a little map showing ville to the roads to be taken from Col
1289.rtown. " There now," said Packy, passing over his stock to Ethelred, " you know
1290.wed himself very solicitous in adjusting about Ethelred's neck the strap which s
1291.Ethelred for rather a long time, tugging here, pulling there. Two hours later in
1292.ather a long time, tugging here, pulling there. Two hours later in the day, Ethe
1293.od much confused and perplexed, watching the receding train, and wondering how h
1294.sed and perplexed, watching the receding train, and wondering how he had been so
1295.tching the receding train, and wondering how he had been so foolish and so wicke
1296. in his self-condemna- Strictly speaking fit he was not a goose, but he had allo
1297.ad, clad in a dainty suit and carry- ing a peddlei s pack, excited no little int
1298.hostilities thus interrupted the opening of was standing on the threshold her ho
1299. interrupted the opening of was standing on the threshold her house. Judging by
1300.ding on the threshold her house. Judging by her face and manner, she was of more
1301.left the others, not slow to follow, ing Mrs. Rainey. Ethelred fac- " ETHELRED P
1302.HELRED PRESTON. " Thank you, ma'am," ing his hat. 24! said Ethelred, remov- " Wh
1303.id Ethelred, remov- " What are you doing here, tinued Mrs. Rainey. 11 little boy
1304.Rainey. 11 little boy ?" con- I'm trying to sell all sorts of things, ma'am; I'm
1305. I'm a peddler." The lady cast a longing look upon the bright face before her to
1306.ht so; your manners are not what calling. I one would expect of a person of your
1307.wares ject, " Ethelred, in thus changing the sub- evinced that he did not wish t
1308.boy, and I can see behind a dear, loving mother. Here Ethelred, as he thought of
1309.of his mother, of his ungrateful parting from her, of his way- ward conduct, cou
1310.st into a fit his emotions no of weeping. " There, there, my dear," said Mrs. Ra
1311.ere, my dear," said Mrs. Rainey, leaving the doorway, advancing to the gate, and
1312.. Rainey, leaving the doorway, advancing to the gate, and patting the boy on the
1313.rway, advancing to the gate, and patting the boy on the head, " I see there I is
1314.n the head, " I see there I is something sad in your past life and won't ask you
1315.our past life and won't ask you anything about it." " Thank you, ma'am," " There
1316.ere think. I is said Ethelred. something sad, but not the way you obliged to you
1317.he way you obliged to you for not asking am me to explain. in a But I I shall ex
1318.he would have been spared much suffering; but shame held there re- him silent. E
1319.nt. Even had he then and solved to bring to an end at once his career as a peddl
1320.nd bade her farewell. " So you are going to Hagartown, my I dear ? You know take
1321.re dimmed re- Ethelred departed thinking of his fond mother. call Oh, how he wis
1322. he wished he could that hour of parting and that silly conspiracy train. on boa
1323.eet for several ; hours of the morn- ing and the pack was heavy moreover, he was
1324.all, it this manner Worst of was growing colder and the wind from the north made
1325. such circumstances. his His were aching with the cold, hands were benumbed; the
1326.d; there was a strange his ears, feeling about not a sharp, but a dull, dead pai
1327.t, and to crown all, darkness was coming on apace over the dull, dead fields and
1328. wind howled desolation. in- was getting colder every moment; and, experienced a
1329.thelred recognized the danger of resting in such an exposure. He arose ETHELRED
1330.ht. 24$ with a heavy heart, and trusting to luck turned And very soon (so weary
1331.he become) he abandoned hope of reaching Hagartown that night. It In the distanc
1332. In the distance, he saw a light shining. If was probably a farm-house. he could
1333. he could only reach that light! failing On he trudged with step; the dull pains
1334.have been frightened. danger of freezing to death. The boy was At length after o
1335. With little difficulty, and was feeling for the latch, when a low growl brought
1336.mouth; and a large mastiff came bounding towards him. in great fear of Ethelred
1337.s a time and act quickly. it Unfastening the pack, he threw road, and upon the h
1338.rew road, and upon the he made summoning all his strength on, determined to reac
1339. all gone. But how drowsy he was getting! He felt that he could sleep for twenty
1340.withheld he was on the point of throwing himself upon the wayside. But some blin
1341.some blind in a sleep him from indulging all which would, in likelihood, have kn
1342.uld, in likelihood, have known no waking. he reached the main road, and At In le
1343. saw another light. It was it was moving. Nearer and nearer there fell came, whi
1344. there fell came, while upon the falling hoofs still air, the sound of and movin
1345.hoofs still air, the sound of and moving wheels. "Help! " called Ethelred. A lan
1346.God! Just in time. The boy is freez- ing to death." Ethelred did into the man's
1347. an inert Quickly forced care- conveying him to the buggy, the man some liquor d
1348.ly in a large buffalo robe, and, turning round, touched his horse with the whip.
1349.ed, as though he realized he were racing against death. Go on, Prince, go on!" c
1350.RESTON, was the robe. dear, for hurrying across the lawn with the boy bundled as
1351.pronounced out of danger. In the evening paper of the following day, there was p
1352.r. In the evening paper of the following day, there was published this item of n
1353. he out recovers. He that terday morning and did quite well, before night it but
1354.ht it but found was a cold day. In going afoot from Collinsville to Hagartown th
1355.llinsville to Hagartown the enterprizing youth lost his road and was nearly Mr.
1356.ney, one of the leadfrozen to death. ing citizens of Collinsville, picked him up
1357.man, but Mrs. Rainey objected, asserting that the boy was too sick to talk. stil
1358.he night of his first attempt at running away. plans. On the instant he changed
1359.ys the students. in the hope of fleecing of some of The danger detection risk. w
1360.was great, but Packy did not mind taking a Before returning to the college, Pack
1361.y did not mind taking a Before returning to the college, Packy scribbled a note
1362.r, in which, affairs, without disclosing fully the state of he entreated him to
1363.m a health bulletin every day concerning the boy who lay sick at Mr. Rainey's ho
1364.r Farwell, and of thu* succeeded keeping informed EthelredV* movements. The ceiv
1365.elredV* movements. The ceived: following letter was the last which he r€ • 2
1366.st, 189-. Deer Nevew: The boy is getting round quite smart and will leave Ranies
1367.anies next wensday. They say he is going to a skule. He is not a peddler. I seen
1368.ingly, after studies on the same evening, with what results the reader already k
1369.d Mrs. Rainey, on shall Thursday morning, M we have to " No; ma'am," it is I who
1370.ve to " No; ma'am," it is I who am going Ethelred, to lose you, said little who,
1371.eated at the breakfast-table, was eating with the appetite which youth and conva
1372.learned a One of the reasons I had going off as a peddler was because school. He
1373.all bitter against I believed everything heard/' " No one can blame you for that
1374.ace and a picture of the Virgin, bending down over tears of joy in I saw your ki
1375.hen like that there couldn't be anything so bad about Catholics. And you were ju
1376.wasn't; and I used to I watch you saying prayers on at like beads. liked to look
1377.our face then; it used to look something the beautiful face of the Virgin in the
1378.he Virgin in the picture. " No, noticing I'm Mrs. in earnest," pursued Ethelred,
1379.indness." Mrs. Rainey kissed the nothing. little boy, but said " I'm ashamed to
1380.o there with a strong intention of doing well." "Thank get settled you, ma'am. I
1381.dness; and I her too that intend wearing that mi- raculous medal you gave till I
1382.rayers to the Blessed Virgin, concluding with a petition for the safety of the l
1383.e window and threw open. It was a biting breeze that blew upon her. not thought
1384.nce had won her heart. She was finishing the last decade when the sound of wheel
1385.no ordinary peddler, and there something mysterious about him. he could not stan
1386.est to* night unless know that something has been done to help him. boe's hotel.
1387.f this she had Ethelred with her looking at her usual simplicity; and Ethelred h
1388. one and you are two and she" is holding up the medal, " three. I have three mot
1389.entered the boy's refect- on the morning of the first Friday in February. "Come
1390. while the good old Father stood smiling and undecided. cant, sat Earl, the firs
1391.t still for very joy, but kept bob- bing up and down like a jack-in-the-box. Rog
1392.s and Peter Lane were there too; waiting upon the breakfast party were the vicep
1393.leaped ETHELRED PRESTON. up and catching the Father's forced cineture Earl. 257
1394.atter," said Earl gravely. help thinking of it in the " I couldn't this morning
1395.g of it in the " I couldn't this morning ago, I after Com- munion. Just one week
1396.olution ? Little Ethelred stopped eating to put on the look of astonishment. " Y
1397.u have a boy in the a good home-training. There isn't yard that are. is better o
1398. respect than you Most of us, in judging others, go a great I'd deal by manners,
1399.d to confirm me in my notion of sticking to Protestantism." " You are going to b
1400.cking to Protestantism." " You are going to be an analyst, Earl," said Father No
1401.nverted you *' ? call mamma's to darling " observed Ethelred. He certainly had a
1402.bout His holy will" " So Mamma's Darling, by coming here, did a heap of good wit
1403.ly will" " So Mamma's Darling, by coming here, did a heap of good without knowin
1404.here, did a heap of good without knowing it," said Roger. M And " In just think
1405. that your kindness has gone for nothing. Let us for hope that the boy may be be
1406.did to pray for him; without in* tending Earl. me a great deal of good," said "
1407.and wouldn't have off did wrong by going peddling, froze but God punished me. He
1408.n't have off did wrong by going peddling, froze but God punished me. He nearly m
1409.er. " When the punishment comes tripping upon the heels of the fault, we see the
1410.ith me, prayed The and I if was freezing, I in earnest, it think God heard me. A
1411.ind, " There's more than that comwinning smile. ing to you from your adventure."
1412.e's more than that comwinning smile. ing to you from your adventure." "What brea
1413.t breast. else, Earl?" of " I'm thinking It is that medal upon your going to con
1414.hinking It is that medal upon your going to convert your of these days." mamma a
1415.and wondered in the light of true coming a whether had been a prediction or prop
1416.1.10. EDUCATIONAL THE. CATHOLIC TEACHING FOR YOUNG AND OLD. Wray Schmidt, net, $
1417..85. ANECDOTES AND EXAMPLES ILLUSTRATING THE CATH- CEREMONIAL FOR ALTAR BOYS. Br
1418.. COMMUNION. Zulueta. PaART OF PROFITING BY OUR per, *$0.08. FAULTS. Tissot. net
1419.3 75 CATECHISM OF THE VOWS CORRECT THING FOR CATHOLICS. Bugg. net, $1.25. FOR TH
1420.GOD, net, $1.75. THE. With re- FOLLOWING SJ. Brown, M.A. OF CHRIST, RESCHLEUTER,
1421.ion, $0.85. net, $3.00. GIFT OF THE KING. By a Religious, net, $0.60. OUT TO WIN
1422.RELIGIOUS STATE, THE. Alpkonsus. Lambing. net, $0.47. St. Doyle, net, cloth, SAC
1423.$1.00. LIGION. Weigand. LAWS OF THE KING. By a SIX ONE-ACT PLAYS. Lord, Religiou
1424.TION IN PARISHES. Garesche, SJ. Spalding, SJ. net, $1.25. net, $2.75. LITTLE ALT
1425.TLE FLOWER'S LOVE FOR AGENCIES. Spalding, SJ. net, HER PARENTS, THE. Sister $2.5
1426. Paper, $0.25. TALKS TO NURSES. Spalding, S.J. 'net, $1.50. TALKS TO PARENTS. Co
1427., THE. gart. net, $0.35. WONDER OFFERING, Taggart. net, $0.55. WONDER STORY, THE
1428. DEVOTION, MEDITATION, SPIRITUAL READING, PRAYER-BOOKS or to ABANDONMENT; Surren
1429.0.28; net, $0.21. JESUS CHRIST, THE KING OF MEDITATIONS FOR EVERY OUR HEARTS. Le
1430.0. MEDITATIONS ON THE LIFE, THE TEACHING AND THE LITTLE MANUAL OF ST. net, Lasan
1431.h. $0.90. LITTLE MASS BOOK, THE. MENDING THE NETS. MORNING-STAR SERIES II. Feely
1432.ASS BOOK, THE. MENDING THE NETS. MORNING-STAR SERIES II. Feely, Lynch. Paper, *$
1433.15. Father. ROSE WREATH FOR THE CROWNING, A. Rev. John P. Clarke, net, $1.00. RU
1434.WAY OF THE CROSS. Paper. *$0.08. MORNING-STAR SERIES I. WAY OF THE CROSS, THE. F
1435.0.30. SERIES KINGDOM III. COME. YEARNING S.J. limp, red edges, $2.00. FOR GOD. $
1436.UR INTERESTS ETERNAL. VALUES EVERLASTING, Garesche, S.J. net, $0.90. Garesche, S
1437. BURIAL RITUAL. Cloth, net, JESUS LIVING IN THE PRIEST. Millet, SJ.-Byrne. $2.50
1438.et, $3.75. net, $3.25. CHRIST'S TEACHING CONCERNING DIVORCE. Gigot. LIBER STATUS
1439.net, $3.25. CHRIST'S TEACHING CONCERNING DIVORCE. Gigot. LIBER STATUS ANIMARUM,
1440.$15.00; Red Amer. morocco, gold stamping and edges, net, $17.50. Red finest qual
1441.S. Size pens, $2.50. $6.00. SJ.-Spalding, S.J. net, OUTLINES OF JEWISH HISTORY.
1442. $6.75. Sold only in packages containing 5 copies of one title. Told net, $0.60.
1443.. ON THE RUN. BOBBY IN MOVIELAND. FACING DANGER. HIS LUCKIEST YEAR. Sequel to "L
1444.Y $0.60. COPPER RIVER. STORIES. Spalding, SJ. net, $1.00. FATHER SPALDING'S BOOK
1445.palding, SJ. net, $1.00. FATHER SPALDING'S BOOKS. CAPTAIN TED. Waggaman. net, Ea
1446.BEECH FORK. IN THE WILDS OF THE Spalding, SJ. net, $1.00. CANYON. SIGNALS FROM T
1447.. net, LUCKY BOB. PERCY WYNN; ORA MAKING A BOY OF HIM. TOM PLAYFAIR; OR, MAKING
1448.G A BOY OF HIM. TOM PLAYFAIR; OR, MAKING A STRAT. CLAUDE LIGHTFOOT; OR. HOW THE
1449.OBLEM WAS SOLVED. HARRY DEE; OR, WORKING IT OUT. ETHELRED PRESTON; OR, THE ADVEN
1450. SANDHILLS. $1.00. Illustrated. Spalding, S.J. AWAKENING OF EDITH, THE. Specking
1451.0. Illustrated. Spalding, S.J. AWAKENING OF EDITH, THE. Specking, net, $1.50. BE
1452., S.J. AWAKENING OF EDITH, THE. Specking, net, $1.50. BERKLEYS, THE. Wight, $0.6
1453.00. APACHES. Ferry, net, $0.60. DIMPLING'S SUCCESS. holland. net, $0.60. ALTHEA.
1454.y. net, $0.60. nelly, net, $0.85. FACING DANGER. Finn, SJ. LAST LAP, THE. McGrat
1455. $1.00. CRUTCHES. Delamare. net, FINDING OF TONY. Wagga$0.60. man. net, $1.25. F
1456.HILDREN, THE. MAD KNIGHT, THE. Schaching, Mannix. net, $0.60. HARMONY FLATS. Whi
1457.MONY FLATS. Whitmire. net, $0.60. MAKING OF MORTLAKE. Conet, $0.85. HARRY DEE. F
1458.$0.85. MARKS OF THE BEAR CLAWS. Spalding, SJ. net, $1.00. HEIR OF DREAMS, AN. O'
1459.F DREAMS, AN. O'MalMARTHA JANE. Specking, net, ley. net, $0.60. $1.50. HELD IN T
1460.IN THE EVERGLADES. MARY ROSE AT BOARDING Spalding, SJ. net, $1.00. SCHOOL, Wirri
1461.ERGLADES. MARY ROSE AT BOARDING Spalding, SJ. net, $1.00. SCHOOL, Wirries. net,
1462. OF THE CANYON. $1.00. Sadlier. Spalding, SJ. a Religious, net, JACK. By H.C.J.
1463.s. net, $0.85. Smith, net, MILLY AVELING. Smith, net, $0.85. MIRALDA. Johnson, n
1464.SHIPMATES. Waggaman. net, ROSE. Spalding, $1 25 SJ. net, $1.00. SIGNALS FROM THE
1465..00. SIGNALS FROM THE BAY TREE. Spalding net, ON THE OLD CAMPING SJ. GROUND. Man
1466.Y TREE. Spalding net, ON THE OLD CAMPING SJ. GROUND. Mannix. net, $0.85. $1.00.
1467. SJ. net, STRANDED ON LONG BAR. Spalding, SJ. net, $1.00. $1.00. ON THE SANDS OF
1468.UGAR CAMP AND AFTER net, $1.50. Spalding, SJ. net, $1.00. PANCHO AND PANCHITA. S
1469.$1.00. PERIL OF DIONYSIO. Mannix. TAMING OF POLLY. Dorsey. net, $1.25. net, $0.6
1470..50. QUEST OF MARY SELWYN* TRANSPLANTING OF TESSIE. RACE FOR COPPER ISLAND. TREA
1471. TREASURE OF NUGGET net, $1.00. Spalding, SJMOUNTAIN. Taggart. net, $0.85. REARD
1472.'S ROCK. net, $0.60. WHERE MONKEYS SWING Boyton. net, $1.25. SEVEN LITTLE MARSHA
1473.K. $1.00. OF THE BEECH SJ. net, Spalding, YOUNG COLOR GUARD. net, $0.60. Bone- V
1474.rth $0.85. net, $0.85. BOY Inez Specking, net, $1.25. BUNNY'S HOUSE. Walker. IT
1475.E KINGDOM. Keon. $1.65. MIRAGE. Specking, MISS ERIN. Francis, Specking, net, net
1476.. Specking, MISS ERIN. Francis, Specking, net, net, $1.50. net, $0.85. net, $1.2
1477.ER'S SISTER. Clarke. net, $1.50. PASSING SHADOWS. Yorke. net, $1.65. TURN OF THE

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: https://concordances.library.nd.edu/app/