Concordance for The Blakes and Flanagans : a tale, illustrative of Irish in the United States / By Mrs. J. Sadlier.

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1.   he Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from University of Notre Dame Hesburgh 
2. ' c c «c ' ' , . . c Entered according to Act of Congress, to die year 1873, b
3. RESH IN MY HEART AND TO THAT EVER-LIVING REMEMBRANCE I DEDICATE THIS WORK. 3/3 o
4. le sphere of action I could the carrying ont of my plan. easily have written a m
5. ls cannot afford to waste time pandering merely to the imagination, or fostering
6. merely to the imagination, or fostering that maudlin sentimentality, which is t
7. but simple, practical stories embodying grave truths, will be read by many, who
8. newspaper publication. It is gratifying to myself to know that the class for wh
9. general well pleased with it. Such being the case, I can confidently send it for
10. its imperfections on its head, trusting that it may he made an instrument — ;
11. HOUSEHOLD Tin. THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL — UNCLE . TIM'S PRACTICAL JOKE
12. DINNER PARTY —THE MISFORTUNE OP HAVING A . . WEAK STOMACH XIX. . . . 300 THE D
13. al city, " Well to was simply a thriving comdo in the world," and of its not muc
14. ce then; the age of progress is hurrying all things onward with a rapidity that
15. eniud the For my part I am quite willing to be age," for " the age" goes much to
16. 1* " " 10 BLAKES AND FLANAGAN'S. liking, my and my sympathies are more with the
17. ut this is not the question; I was going to tell and here I digression York, twe
18. York, twenty-five years ago, am, making comparisons which many of my a story of
19. n Tipperary man, hot-blooded, blustering, and loud A spoken, yet kind and genero
20. . unmistakeable Milesian, real reminding one of friend Wolfe's description of hi
21. n — poor So bold and frank his bearing, boy, Should you meet him onward faring
22. , boy, Should you meet him onward faring, boy, In Lapland's snow, Or Chili's glo
23. — ! leather-dresser, his persevering industry, a position of His wife was a
24. f His wife was a all, quiet, home-loving woman, a neat, tidy housewife, a carefu
25. m, and their chief ambition was to bring up their children in the same faith. ch
26. from such parents; healthy and blooming as mountain flowers, cheerful, docile,
27. as the sun of their solar system, giving life and warmth tn which the themselves
28. nd and wife were more anxious for making money than anything else; and though th
29. e anxious for making money than anything else; and though they professed to be g
30. ness in money matters, ready and willing to spare something to those who it. rea
31. rs, ready and willing to spare something to those who it. really stood in need o
32. up, it especially were for the building or repairing of a church, for Miles tho
33. ially were for the building or repairing of a church, for Miles thought that chu
34. le wanted with them, when good schooling still, for their children, free of all
35. ildren his wife fifteen, duties, deeming that quite sufficient. Of who had been
36. . Of who had been born but two remaining the other a girl, ; to them, Miles Blak
37. was so pale and destin- delicate looking that seemed as though she were sisters
38. uch an idea never occurred to her doting parents, who loved their children "not
39. he if most friendly and familiar footing, and a cloud did at times overshadow th
40. that I have brought forward the leading characters of my story, and given the r
41. o families had been brought up offending party. years, ever since Thus had thing
42. ke sisters all round. Eliza Blake, being, from her infancy, of a frail and delic
43. hers and cousins, with a sort of pitying tenlittle derness; her in whims were ;
44. rents and friends made her over-exacting; still she was a very good little girl,
45. not get iuto some " scrape," defend- ing his religion. these His father was well
46. ous, ? were never seen or heard fighting calumniated. for their religion Simply
47. fe smiled 10 that, fui' and said nothing, but it was well known with all her mil
48. he Sisters of Charity, and a flourishing school they had of There were but few C
49. chool many a valued citizen did it bring up for a tew of the boys who "sat at th
50. ved, neither could succeed in convincing the other, although Miles had been know
51. and told her, with think of such a thing. nn'jsu?--. sternness not to is The sch
52. , quiet now, Lizzy, and don't be getting your uncle Tim's notions into your head
53. re sent, but she had no fancy for seeing Harry come home day after day with some
54. or a bloody nose. dislike for " fighting," She had a womanly and would have been
55. Now Miles, what on earth is squab- bling and fighting ?" she said one after layi
56. at on earth is squab- bling and fighting ?" she said one after laying day to her
57. nd fighting ?" she said one after laying day to her husband, eye-brow. ago that'
58. ou to encourage him sticking-plaster on a cut over Harry's " It's a
59. ung scamps :hem, when they get a-running down his religion ?" THE DRAMATIS PERSO
60. atoes — I want the bag for some- thing else." Before the potatoes were all tur
61. k," said he, " for I see you're handling the murphies, there —and this fine sp
62. specimens they are, too, in considering that they didn't grow Ireland. What's g
63. What's gone wrong with Harry 11 morning?" " he's been at his old lies Oh ! not
64. uch, Tim, not much," said Miles, rubbing ; the dust leisurely off his hands trad
65. ff his hands trade, that's all, cramming the down some of the Yankee his eye* bo
66. e Johnson boys and the Herricks, and ing* of them, are maknot a great brag of ho
67. gave Harry Blake a good he'll trouncing this morning, and one, they think, that
68. lake a good he'll trouncing this morning, and one, they think, that get over for
69. n young scoundrels " They did a towering passion. They lie, the — they lie," c
70. to him, he goes on at this you're making your game of me now," said somewhat coo
71. me up with you to talk of my son turning Protestant did you ever know a turn-coa
72. often told you pat and you're thrusting your two ! fine children — you before
73. know no om THE DRAMATIS PERSONS. arguing with yon, but I appeal to Mary, there,
74. School with your youngsters. Eliza going to St. It seems unnatural-like to be se
75. t. It seems unnatural-like to be sending them to a Protes" tant school." Why, ba
76. r no religion " Why, what do you Begging your pardon," returned Tim, very coolly
77. ar religion can be taught without giving offence to some parties concerned " " W
78. iza go to catechism every Sunday morning, and Fm sure / do all I can, and 11 the
79. ou think all Catholic children attending Ward Schools are sent rejju- 80 fcarly
80. id " Now, Tim," Miles, suddenly breaking it is, in, " the short and the long of
81. are as far advanc- ed in their learning as any other boy and girl we know of th
82. reless about your religion than fighting for it every day of your life." differe
83. ell, now, Tim, there's no use in talking —things are you before, and as long a
84. nd as long as I see the children getting on well with their education, and still
85. ith their education, and still remaining good Catholics, I'm willing to send the
86. ll remaining good Catholics, I'm willing to send them to the didn't, Ward when S
87. to educate our children without meddling with their religion. What do you say, M
88. V But Mary was busily engaged, preparing some Indian corn for the pot, and had n
89. ow much about it. You've been arguit ing about schools these five years, and I d
90. ssensions between you." with her cooking, compared with which the school-ques- u
91. ool-ques- up, for tion sank into nothing in her eyes. * Well, good-bye," said Ti
92. yes. * Well, good-bye," said Tim, rising and taking his hat, " I wish you both a
93. , good-bye," said Tim, rising and taking his hat, " I wish you both a good appet
94. e got home, he could not help expressing his : them people below are enough to v
95. Well, Tim dear, I wouldn't be bothering my brains arguing with him days." — h
96. wouldn't be bothering my brains arguing with him days." — he'll find out his
97. these " Yes, but him, isn't it provoking to see a sensible man, like acting so f
98. oking to see a sensible man, like acting so foolishly ? By my too. word, I think
99. know she's at bottom, as against sending the children to the Ward all in School
100. y it She's so submissive, and so willing to leave if Miles's hands, just as she
101. n say yourself that you can make nothing of him." and, she added with an arch sm
102. the •k, man to blame a wife for being submissive, Tim ? Sit over, now, and ta
103. mother, who was busily engaged preparing breakfast, could not help expressing he
104. ing breakfast, could not help expressing her vexation at sight of the patch whic
105. on earth tempts yt>u to go a-fight- ing as you do ?" " Why, religion, mother, t
106. how more respect for religion by keeping out of brawls, and trying ?" bear patie
107. ion by keeping out of brawls, and trying ?" bear patiently with the trouble- som
108. I to do with beatitudes V a pretty thing it would be for a fellow like me to hea
109. fellow like me to hear such coons making their game of papists, and ' " Nonsense
110. se, mother, — TH1 TWO SCHOOLS. talking about time, as * 23 the dirty Irish/ an
111. me, as * 23 the dirty Irish/ and looking at as to it." me all I'll the much if s
112. almost think you were ashamed of having Irish blood in your veins I declare you
113. asked near ready. too long this morning, and the breakfast were " There's Eliza
114. I guess she slept now !" she's spending so much late. time at her prayers that
115. with your prayers at girl to be praying there for 'most half ? So you have Ain'
116. time " I guess you'll catch this morning." And what if I Father Power tells you
117. s you know us not to neglect our morning or evendo I learned ?" returned his sis
118. I learned ?" returned his sister, " ing prayers on any account. my lessons yest
119. account. my lessons yester- aay evening, and I'm to get 11 all ready for school
120. e have it Yes, my dear, I'm just a-going to As for now, mother ?" put it on the
121. see that you're particular about saying your prayers. to him. Harry, I don't is
122. hat to say I'm afraid that school making a lad of him !" " Hush, mother, here's
123. !" " Hush, mother, here's father coming in." And Harry 14 fiLAEIS AND FLANAGANS
124. nd the table with a great show of making himself useful. " Well, table, Harry,"
125. ace at the is " how the cut this morning ? do you don't feel it much " ?" it fee
126. liza, that you look so pale thia morning ?" Yes, father, pretty sore, but it k<
127. " Why, in then, was such a hurry getting the breakfast that I didn't notice her.
128. no fear of me another of those me being sick while I can cat so heartily," and
129. y went out tc her husband, who was tying up some parcels in the store. " Now, I
130. l you what it is, Miles, they're killing that child by inches." " How is that, M
131. at she has. There they have her learning whole pages of books that's of no earth
132. she has her trigonometry lesson, rhyming over the long cramp words that's in the
133. , I'm sure I don't know ; if I listening for a year I couldn't ; make head or ta
134. re she till is, day is after day, poring over them the very flesh ! worn off her
135. them " tion, lessons that I was speaking names ?" Why, Mary, we want Eliza to ge
136. ry concerned, for he'a every day getting more sturdy and resolute on our hands.
137. r hands. Perhaps, after all, we're doing what's wrong ?" in sending the children
138. , we're doing what's wrong ?" in sending the children to that school — eh, Mil
139. , what maggot has bit you this i morning that you're making such a fuss about sc
140. it you this i morning that you're making such a fuss about schools Don't you kno
141. me the call oranches that you're talking Catholic schools, and about are taught
142. s about to make when a cus- tomer coming time, in put an end to the conversation
143. ared with him on that particular morning. The teacher, Mr. Simpson, was a very s
144. rey eyes, that were continually glancing round from one object to little vain. H
145. y the effect of long years of " watching the boys." No one hr-d ever seen Mr. Si
146. on seen, like the 44 in a shabby-looking coat, ; such as al- teachers are wont t
147. a gentleman whose dexterity in "handling" the faith of young Papists was well-ni
148. f our friend Pat, of Donny This handling "his sprig of Shillelah." Bmooth-spoken
149. notice of Harry's entrance that morning, because the bell had rung Borne ten mi
150. with the combat of the previous evening. bor, His next neigh- Hugh Dillon, was
151. ct, School ever since boy had been going to the he was five years old, and now,
152. n, he was a Catholic late, name, nothing more. In he began, of rather to take si
153. on the ground that Irish-like," fighting for religion was "too and only for Harr
154. hen yourself. what do you want, fighting for the Irish and their religion, "Padd
155. ext to our friend, Harry, on the morning put of in question. Talking was, of cou
156. the morning put of in question. Talking was, of course, forbidden, but the two
157. ision furtive looks and contempt meeting all hira on every this side. To a high
158. and gave me a push that sent me reeling against the wall " Yes, but didn't y on
159. perfection that the boys within hearing to all laughed, Sam's great mortificati
160. my dear pupils, before how silly a thing it is to fight religion, you can know w
161. shall never again hear of you inveighing against any form of worship; even the R
162. again take upon you to fight for a thing which youdo not understand." Herrick ma
163. nt that he could not refrain from saying, " Sir, don't care my religion is the b
164. dly. if " I don't understand your having a religion it but is you have, you must
165. best or worst here, for we have nothing to do with any? But, sir, you spoke aga
166. nd a'n't fair —you didn't say anything his bad any said about day." " Sam Herr
167. the reason, in my good boy said nothing V Simpson his blandest voice; religion,
168. ce. Here you are all on the same footing at home with your parents, you may, of
169. the school. You never hear him brawling or fighting about religion. I tell !' I
170. You never hear him brawling or fighting about religion. I tell !' In the words
171. if possible. his parallelograms Leaving Harry intent on the and conic sections,
172. to see how young Flanagans are " getting on " undei the tuition *. of their old-
173. ience of five-aud-twenty years' teaching. not for 32 BLAKES AND ILANAGANS. all n
174. for 32 BLAKES AND ILANAGANS. all nothing that I have beon that time teaching ' t
175. hing that I have beon that time teaching ' the young idea how to shoot.' Believe
176. take a stronger arm than mine, ay bring it ! even the omnipotent arm of God, to
177. gard " man's fallen state w as something mofe than a speculation. When the three
178. Mr. Lanigan seated at his desk, whiling away the remaining quarter of an hour l
179. at his desk, whiling away the remaining quarter of an hour looking over a copy
180. the remaining quarter of an hour looking over a copy of the Dublin Freeman's Jou
181. ed "from home" by the last mail. Leaving his brothers to go to their Edward Flan
182. st to interrupt him, there is no knowing how long he might have stood, had not t
183. , sir, to come down a while this evening to our house. He sir, has something to
184. ning to our house. He sir, has something to tell you, and he says, if you please
185. ou, and he says, if you please, to bring the Irish paper with you ; he heard you
186. can at How are all at home this morning ?" " All well, sir, thank you." 11 Well
187. es." now Then — up the grammar raising his voice, and layI'll call : ing down
188. aising his voice, and layI'll call : ing down his spectacles on the desk " Boys,
189. od seniors ventured to say, in a coaxing tone " news." " No, no ; go on with you
190. the old gentleman Rtood up, and placing his right hand on the desk, said : " Bo
191. is forenoon, you continue as good during the afternoon, I purpose giving you a h
192. d during the afternoon, I purpose giving you a holiday to-morrow, in honor of ou
193. eet Act good Christian boys, remembering that you are all fhe sons of St. Patric
194. rp, now, or he might rue about we giving us the holiday, to-morrow. How do you k
195. , to-morrow. How do you know but looking after us he so he is ?" And piness was
196. us he so he is ?" And piness was looking after them, exulting in the hap- he had
197. piness was looking after them, exulting in the hap- he had himself created, and
198. ap- he had himself created, and thinking, as N. P. : Willis has since written TH
199. avj was like them ? What a strange thing is this life of ours, and how impercept
200. half a century it is a melancholy thing to faith, feel ourselves growing old, y
201. y thing to faith, feel ourselves growing old, yet, are still thanks to our divin
202. Here am I, an old man of sixty, looking forward to the celebration of St. Patri
203. ical power on our Irish hearts So saying, Mr. Lanigan carefully closed the doors
204. the well known way When visit to evening came, the old own domicile.. man paid h
205. t girl on his knee when Mr. half sitting-room, ; Lanigan entered, but, no sooner
206. wn and ran to "climb his knee," claiming, at the same time, the performance of a
207. an began to pout, and would keep talking about the picture book, till at last he
208. take her away, under pretence of having her wind up her ball of yarn, ravelled
209. , who was gamMr. Lanigan'i his ' bolling about the room. The boys got chair. ing
210. , rather behind " If he was after giving Susan one of dresa- whispered Edward to
211. , " but then he never givea 1 a dressing ' to a#y one that don't deserve it. Non
212. Listen to what father and he are saying." " Well, I'm heart sorry for Miles," o
213. it's his own fault, sir. If he's sending his children head foremost into the pit
214. er, sir — is as much against the thing as I am, only she doesn't like, you see
215. Bewitched !" said Mr. Lanigan, laughing, " yes, he is bewitched by the in spiri
216. of his children best promoted by sending them to Pro- testant or mixed schools.
217. fallacy, better than any human reasoning." " late God !" grant that the knowledg
218. OOLS " 31 V* Can Father Power do nothing with Miles " Surely \. quired Mr. Lanig
219. a- " I have heard Father Power reasoning cased with him, and he'd always manage
220. ch. You'll is be the better of something to raw.'-' if warm you, sir, the night
221. an yourself ! —Don't you take anything yourself, Mrs. Flanagan " No, ?" sir, t
222. " sir, thank you, I never take any thing stronger coffee. than tea or Children,
223. hi? to bed. head full of the approaching festival. 38 BLiKES AND FLANiGiH. CHAPT
224. was " St. Patrick's day, in the morning/' and the tfhole Irish population of th
225. arious commotion ; men and boys were ing in crowds towards the place of meeting,
226. g in crowds towards the place of meeting, each one dressed "in his best," and we
227. h one dressed "in his best," and wearing on his breast a badge of " our own immo
228. and, as band after band came up playing " Patrick's day," " Garry Owen," or "Th
229. , the if light faded from the laugh; ing eye, and tenderness, spell not sorrow,
230. t multitude, and, save the soft, wailing music, no sound was to be heard. Memory
231. les returned, and every foot was beating time tc " Garry Owen na Glora." Such is
232. e scene, he had before him a of " losing his place " in several certain vision s
233. e foot of the class, on account of being a day absent, is and, worse than all !
234. mathematics just now, or even hammering Sam Herrick." And he wondered how his c
235. take such an interest in what was going on. himself sort of thing, but " they h
236. what was going on. himself sort of thing, but " they ha'n't got to lose their pl
237. lf, the opportunity." fell And so saying, the indignant bis brothers young champ
238. in who were tell close behind, muttering to himself: it." " If I don't Father Po
239. ps of distin- Irishmen were seen wending their homeward way, guished by their ga
240. Blake talks sometimes " V he been saying now, Why, what has Ned repeated the Ned
241. e anx- iously, at the same time dropping her own knife and fork it isn't " is it
242. you did, Nelly, I know you I'm thinking told expected : I have nothing to of Mi
243. thinking told expected : I have nothing to of Miles Blake say to the stew only
244. what's good. ; you see it's just coming to pass as I often you it would. Now, f
245. I he were only put under proper training. He was it as promising a child as ever
246. proper training. He was it as promising a child as ever I laid my eyes upon, an
247. for ? sure we its haven't seen anything to say very bad of him yet, and always
248. d the devil good dene you could to bring Miles to reason, and, after all, Tim, i
249. mong them other sort that's what's doing the — — mischief." " To be sure ing
250. the — — mischief." " To be sure ing he gets net Nelly — that and the Prot
251. ly !" the we'll not give it up so Having thus relieved his mind by talking over
252. Having thus relieved his mind by talking over matter, Tim recovered his natural
253. etude in a children. Towards the evening, Eliza Blake came in, her usually pale
254. er usually pale face flushed and smiling, and a certain nervous trepi- dation in
255. e of was pretty evident her joy. Running up to then her aunt, who was sewing at
256. ning up to then her aunt, who was sewing at a small table near the stove, ; she
257. red eagerly round to see what was coming. "Why, what have you 11 got there, Eliz
258. ou seem so delighted ?" " Oh ! something very its nice, aunty — only look n an
259. ook n and \ she drew from paper covering a handsomely bound volume, gi-lt-edged
260. she held up before her aunt, whispering at the same time " There's some beautif
261. would be pleased you and that I am doing so it well, at school, so I just brough
262. eded to investigate the contents, saying " I wonder if it's as pretty within as
263. the name. That ought to be a good thing. or so.' Have you read any of it, Eliza
264. what is it about ?" Oh about the burning ! of some people I didn't it in Spain l
265. look at it V " There can't come anything good from — that quarter," said he to
266. Eliza handed him the book, and, leaning over his shoulder, pointed out the word
267. ritten on a to fly leaf at the beginning : Presented , for -punctuality her stud
268. ned down, to Eliza's great dismay waxing redder and redder as he proceeded Tim's
269. is it, at all ?" r " It's the very thing I expected to find it, only a little wo
270. a system, and deformity of demoralizing influence on the the abominations of th
271. fine Wouldn't it book as that ?" holding be a thousand pities to burn such a it
272. so surprised a** Miss Davison for giving me such a book as that, and she I'll kn
273. uch a book as that, and she I'll knowing very well that I'm a Catholic. home, an
274. - father that place you're after reading as soon as ever I go take the book back
275. know God has his own good time for doing everything. Just go down yourself with
276. s his own good time for doing everything. Just go down yourself with the book an
277. n candy " I come back, and to I'll bring jou lots of Would you like go with him
278. Why, sure he time of never says anything to you, Eliza? know he gives it to your
279. e but I thought he ; never said anything cross to you." " Well, no more he don't
280. he don't, aunty to hear any one scolding, lc ; but then I never like feel makes
281. e it, aunty, we it very It a'n't reading a book that would make us Protestants,
282. other had time to answer " it was eating the forbidden fruit that made the first
283. h her brightest smile ; " you're getting on so fast these times that you'll soon
284. ep out of the way of such books. getting yoa Children, it's getting late ! >ught
285. ooks. getting yoa Children, it's getting late ! >ught to be learning your lesson
286. it's getting late ! >ught to be learning your lessons." When Tim Flanagan saunte
287. s, and his face as com- posed as nothing were wrong, he found Miles very busy se
288. wrong, he found Miles very busy serving some customers. nod was as much as he c
289. . inside." A Mrs. Blake was just setting the table for supper, and Harry was sit
290. table for supper, and Harry was sitting one side learning his lessons by the li
291. and Harry was sitting one side learning his lessons by the light of one of thos
292. States. Harry I" said his uncle, taking a seat near him, " you seem to be fonde
293. good I suppose ; I don't like ; anything about the Bible coming it, from Protest
294. t like ; anything about the Bible coming it, from Protestants there's a snare in
295. me, Miles," said his wife, " I was going to without call you. till Supper's read
296. some What's your best news ?" " Nothing worth speaking of, if it isn't the beau
297. ur best news ?" " Nothing worth speaking of, if it isn't the beautiful batch of
298. l batch of cakes that I saw Mary putting in the oven there " Agreed," said Miles
299. ou can." " Here they are, Miles, smoking hot. Sit over, Tim, and try if they're
300. 't care if I do, then," said Tim, moving I'm as 3 50 his chair B LAKES AND FLANA
301. Now that you're in the way of satisfying your hunger, Miles, I tion. want to ask
302. , Mary, if you ; please." be for finding fault with that book now," said Miles,
303. looked at her husband, but said nothing. She had a misgiving that all was not r
304. d, but said nothing. She had a misgiving that all was not right, but thought she
305. les's face that in the steam was getting up, aud they waited the result Bileuce.
306. about Cranmer, the reprobate, smuggling his old jade Germany in a chest ! Ah, t
307. .') . J £ 1 A* N: 4U N S . you to bring back the book, when you expose your chi
308. u rememthe danger of Protestant teaching ? ber the old saying, there's more ways
309. Protestant teaching ? ber the old saying, there's more ways of killing a dog tha
310. old saying, there's more ways of killing a dog than self. What good will it do f
311. n self. What good will it do for choking him with butter ? This villain of a boo
312. common schools. Now my little beginning to read, and Sister Mary Teresa for gav
313. y be sure there was no poison in nothing about Papist ignorance or superstition,
314. pt at it so. If your children were going to the same schools as mine you'd have
315. ls as mine you'd have no need of getting in a passion, or returning bad books on
316. ed of getting in a passion, or returning bad books on the teachers, take my word
317. candle I'll burn just Tim always holding up his children as will an example, and
318. sudden, that " it was time to be moving home." it ; " Isn't a poor case, Tim, d
319. night, So he bid them goodstore, nodding to Miles as he passed through the : and
320. as he passed through the : and muttering to himself as he walked home " Convince
321. y. I think it's time will you were going home now, look-out. your mother added,
322. 's the hard fate that he's prcpaiv ; ing for you with his wild notions that woul
323. would support your old age he's breaking the and his \ n " 54 11 BLAKES ANH FLAN
324. or ; he's when the time comes for sowing now, nobody can be sorry him as he brew
325. fervor, and then the night prayers being read aloud by Tim, the family went " to
326. prepare for bed," not without a parting prayer to St. Patrick to watch over and
327. r and protect " them and theirs " during the ensuing year. Thus ended ful St. Pa
328. t " them and theirs " during the ensuing year. Thus ended ful St. Patrick's day
329. lanagan's peace- household. Next morning Miles Blake went with Eliza 1 to school
330. Mr. Blake V proud to hear she was doing so } " Everything wrong, Miss, everythi
331. to hear she was doing so } " Everything wrong, Miss, everything wrong let ; so
332. o } " Everything wrong, Miss, everything wrong let ; so I'll thank you to give E
333. e enlightened we would how ! sad a thing it is to ' sit ' thus ' in darkness and
334. f this prepa- ration for a class meeting, whereat she proposed to make melanchol
335. TREE BEGINS TO BEAR FRUIT. Next morning when Harry and for school, their Eliza
336. d for school, their Eliza were preparing if mother asked Eliza Miss Davison had
337. ked Eliza Miss Davison had said anything to her about the book. 11 No, mother, n
338. bad, heard some of the it. girls making fun and carrying on to pass in froirt o
339. of the it. girls making fun and carrying on to pass in froirt of : ' about Every
340. any of the !' ' benches, they'd be going on with Why, do : ' tell Did Don't you
341. for said his in mother, lajnng Bmoothing-iron she had sir, her hand, down the "a
342. y that mother could hardly help laughing, ; notwithstanding her just anger " hol
343. hardly help laughing, ; notwithstanding her just anger " hold on a little I 56
344. hy, your father, as sure as I'm a living woman." no, mother, you wouldn't be so
345. cruel, said the ' waggish boy, vaulting out the back way, and drawing sister af
346. , vaulting out the back way, and drawing sister after him. his foi " Come ! alon
347. And why te41 not ?" said Harry, turning short round, her the truth ?" " didn't
348. liza ; ! " a Why, do you think I'm going to be boy always " Well, 14 shan't 1 he
349. hat any one else could not help laughing but Eliza was no laughing humor, and sh
350. help laughing but Eliza was no laughing humor, and she entered the school-room
351. I she'll never have the chance of acting so again." Now, Eliza Blake was then no
352. and, though gifted with an understanding beyond her years, Btill she could not s
353. ee the utility of her father's returning the book. She very naturally considered
354. e, but just put it it. would say nothing of does snugly 355. e to herself, ?" " to have them laughing especially so ; and what harm could the
356. ution," and when Eliza came next morning, she found friend." " particular This g
357. tery. " It first opportunity of clearing up the it, was I that did dear Eliza, t
358. o come. for premiums Never mind thanking me, you'll do as much hard, now, and wi
359. hat was a reason the more for her trying to keep ahead of them. was dismissed, E
360. er to wait for him. The two were talking very earnestly, and Eliza heard Zach "
361. I guess you'W come, won't you ? I saying miss seeing that for a hundred dollars.
362. W come, won't you ? I saying miss seeing that for a hundred dollars. wouldn't ha
363. 59 'Jane and Arabella are always talking about you, and mother would be real gla
364. d Eliza, " ?" w here's that you're going this evening, you and Zach "Why, " I wh
365. w here's that you're going this evening, you and Zach "Why, " I where would be
366. and Zach "Why, " I where would be going? so What makes you you needn't deny it.
367. you you needn't deny it. think I'm going anywhere ?" overheard you talking of it
368. going anywhere ?" overheard you talking of it, You're going to some place that
369. verheard you talking of it, You're going to some place that you don't want fathe
370. now." " Nonsense, Lizzy, don't be making a fool of yourself j 1 tell you we're n
371. of yourself j 1 tell you we're not going anywhere that I kaow of." •0 14 BLAKE
372. AND FUJSiGANS. 1 tell you you are going guess where it is." " so£p<*h here, an
373. be, Miss Wh^icre V Ftrry ; "You're going you're going." the theatre, that's wher
374. cre V Ftrry ; "You're going you're going." the theatre, that's where "To " the t
375. t passed ; ; tricks on father pretending you want a now you needn\ v?e playing n
376. ng you want a now you needn\ v?e playing new book, or f something like that." Ha
377. dn\ v?e playing new book, or f something like that." Harry saw there was no use
378. that." Harry saw there was no use trying to conceal t^s it act, so he applied hi
379. and then. As it him sometimes for being so stingy about his money, for they wou
380. he had none. They werq just then passing a confectioner's shop, and mean of him
381. ictionary, go and and don't be bothering me any more ; anyhow Mind and take care
382. lf an hour after, Harry was entertaining ZacL Thomson, and some others of to hea
383. so again of him, I'll give you something to remember." " Why, I meant no offence
384. " getically. 11 " I didn't say anything it's ill of you, did I said it V of No,
385. hority all " this no time for squabbling. in Are you re. ready now ?" The boys a
386. Half an hour more and Harry was leaning over the front of the upper gallery, in
387. uence of the brigand chief, and learning, under life. his auspices, to confound
388. and the effect was electrical, pervading the whole frame, heart, and mind. He fo
389. you wait for It it ?" Harry knew nothing would wait to see it of after-pieces, b
390. paternal correction and maternal chiding, and Harry was forced to quit that scen
391. ret. a'n't " 11 Why, surely, you a-going ?" whispered Zach. I didn't think it Ye
392. of happy faces, he could not help saying to himself with a heavy sigh: "It's wel
393. had gone to bed. His mother was sitting ; up but for him, whiling away the time
394. er was sitting ; up but for him, whiling away the time darning stockings her pal
395. t for him, whiling away the time darning stockings her pale face and heavy eyes
396. e was to say " thank God !" But checking herself, she put on as serious a face a
397. never been in the habit of tell excusing himself by falsehood, yet he dared not
398. her was gone to bed, and that me getting so uneasy. And it was the sorrowful new
399. said last Sunday week about people going to ! - 64 B LAKES A\ D FLANAGANS. I'm s
400. . I'm sure and cer* theatres, or letting their children go. tain, if your father
401. hem companions of yours that are leading you astray and if God hasn't said it, t
402. y'll I see that plain enough ; — bring you to an ill end !" " Well, mother," s
403. if I ; ?" " " I'll you're well deserving of a beating." it will And get the beat
404. I'll you're well deserving of a beating." it will And get the beating, I promis
405. a beating." it will And get the beating, I promise you do me no good. don't ' Y
406. 'll you like. I and gives me a walloping' as he says himself, just go to the the
407. lamp take your choice." to And so saying, he took So you up his go to bed. " Wel
408. or God forgive you this night, and bring ! a sense of your error I'm afraid nobo
409. thcugb the fault's not mine Next morning, Harry got a father for being; out so l
410. xt morning, Harry got a father for being; out so late " reprimand from yc u, at
411. t. ?" Where " did you spend your evening, my good boy At Mr. I Thomson's, sir. Z
412. and sir, Silas Green, and " were making maps, ? the whole evening." Making maps
413. " were making maps, ? the whole evening." Making maps ?" — are you sure that'
414. aking maps, ? the whole evening." Making maps ?" — are you sure that's what yo
415. you sure that's what you were polishing doing " Oh yes, sir, quite sure." Harry
416. ure that's what you were polishing doing " Oh yes, sir, quite sure." Harry was b
417. honest shame. Now Miles looked standing in society up to Mr. Thomson as a man o
418. her hands in mute astonishment, drawing back a little behind her husband ; but
419. y, I forgive you for you might be taking up with bad company, but I'm sure you'l
420. company, but I'm sure you'll see nothing bad or low at Mr. Thomson's. in They're
421. a very nice man he is." As I was saying, you'd never hear one of them at all ru
422. 'd never hear one of them at all runuing down Papists like or any of that set. S
423. I'd rather, for my part, see you taking up with Catholic boys. Let these lads b
424. boy, " Hut, tut, Nelly, don't be making a fool of yourself !* " Isn't it always
425. boys there's some all credit in getting in with them, and besides, when they ea
426. lift him to the gallows than to anything else slighting way in — Lord save us,
427. gallows than to anything else slighting way in — Lord save us, but you're get
428. in — Lord save us, but you're getting high in the world yourself, when you tu
429. your temper, Mary," said Miles laughing, " Vm ; ; Bure I meant no harm fit ; pe
430. no harm fit ; people needn't be putting on % cap that doesn't them. Go off to s
431. d you ought to be to see your son taking up with the sons of wealthy, respectabl
432. rom where it will, and he'll get a-going to the theatre, and everywhere but wher
433. To the theatre, Mary ? why you're raving as sure as a 88 gun. BLAKES AND FLANAGA
434. that, Miles ? But here I am, clattering away and has to go to market yet. Just
435. ket yet. Just think of what I was saying, Miles," she added, turning back from t
436. I was saying, Miles," she added, turning back from the door with her basket in h
437. with her basket in her hand " the thing has gone far enough already, if it goes
438. the art of man can't cure it." So saying, she went out, leaving Miles to his own
439. re it." So saying, she went out, leaving Miles to his own reflections. At first
440. rst it seemed as though Mary's reasoning had brought conviction to his mind he t
441. " — and — • ; small room, uttering an occasional " so Humph," — " Perhap
442. top to take a survey of what was passing in the shop, through a pane of glass in
443. glass in the door, and at length, seeing some "good customer" enter ^.he outer d
444. r, he " flung care to the winds," saying to fiimself as he hastily opened the do
445. s or Father send Power, and Pm not going to offend him for any of them. He has o
446. wouldn't let her go to spend the evening Harry and I had to go before we could g
447. siness had you to promise without asking " my 11 V said her mother. You shan't g
448. ked you to Tim's. to us spend an evening anywhere except at uncle If you'o just
449. Mrs. Blake could not resist the pleading look with which Eliza accompanied these
450. nge to her to see boys and girls romping tried in pleasantly, though Eliza did f
451. ogether, and she could not help thinking from time to TO time, BLAKES AND FLANAG
452. s as these. do not like all this kissing," but her the time bashiulness was so r
453. sty, and began to enjoy the wild romping going on. Harry was just in his element
454. nd began to enjoy the wild romping going on. Harry was just in his element, for
455. liza blushed and stammered out something about Miss Davison*s being very kind, i
456. out something about Miss Davison*s being very kind, indeed. " And what do you sa
457. o the tongue ; but Eliza, with trembling haste whispered in his ear, " Harry, Ha
458. y one hear you. They don't know anything here about keeping Friday. You needn't
459. y don't know anything here about keeping Friday. You needn't take any if you don
460. it I go to confession ? but say nothing about now —promise to me that you " w
461. me that you " will promise no such thing," replied Eliza. You and deserve to get
462. mit a grave mis- demeanor, such as lying, disobeying his parents or teacher, was
463. mis- demeanor, such as lying, disobeying his parents or teacher, was forthwith d
464. as quite sufficient to deter the cursing, or swearing, he They had a wholesome f
465. icient to deter the cursing, or swearing, he They had a wholesome fear of Mr. La
466. had its weight, undoubtedly, in keeping them " to their trumps," as Mr. boys fr
467. ir trumps," as Mr. boys from any glaring misconduct. — — st. peter's school
468. ect ; endowed with a strong and piercing er, a giant in the arena of controversy
469. affectionate solicitude, and his winning gentleness of manner made him quite a f
470. id that, in his presence, ,; Long ruling prejudice abashed became, ; And error s
471. better to call him Father Power a thing very common amongst filial the Irish, w
472. wild, hot-headed fellow, and delighting in the perpetration of all manner of an
473. d not keep anger against any human being one half-hour at a time. for He could l
474. t was not often, and, as a general thing, Mike went others to school without hav
475. ike went others to school without having looked at his lessons, in his class and
476. ons, in his class and stood up depending on the assistance of who were more stud
477. us, to prompt him. And the boys, knowing this, were always ready and willing to
478. wing this, were always ready and willing to do it (provided Mr. Lanigau's eye wa
479. d lad, wholly engrossed with and looking up to Mr. Lanigan as the greatest poten
480. ma mater. iras a bright sunshiny morning about the beginning of May. Catechism w
481. ght sunshiny morning about the beginning of May. Catechism was just over, and th
482. y, " with spectacles on nose," preparing hia throat by divers " hems," as he gla
483. s school. his forces lord, ; 7& watching their liege of and there stood the boys
484. eager, anxious eyes, some them glancing at each other with imploring gestures,
485. em glancing at each other with imploring gestures, as much as to say, " be sure
486. hat a different character you were going to give them. One would think you had b
487. m. One would think you had been learning geography at Mr. Simpson's school. Tom
488. trength and magnificence, and such thing, Tom." The boys " Can any one tell ? mi
489. were celebrated because of their having each a great university or college, to
490. ians tell see, for times which the lying call the dark ages. can any of you me f
491. your geography ST. PETER'S SCHOOL. going to tell *\1 But mind whatTm you, so tha
492. tion. SaTagossa is remarkable for having one of the most famous shmes of the Ble
493. ited. timidly raised his voice, blushing for : " little, Peter, well done ! bles
494. t; of a fellow," said the master, eyeing him through his spectacles with an affe
495. you are under my tuition, you deserving another must be subject to me, sir do y
496. r," said Tom, sheepishly, and not daring to lift ; ; up you go, so sure as think
497. d, and bade God bless him, after hearing Mr. Lanigan's kind " report. God bless
498. God bless you. life. You The are laying acquisition the foundation of a good an
499. ay go now, Peter, and here is a shilling for you to buy cakes." So Peter made hi
500. made the best of his way home, thinking- ail the time what he was to do with hi
501. e was to do with his bright new shilling. "Father Power told me to buy cakes wit
502. ice cakes, little but then I'd be giving some to Mike, and some to eat Annie, an
503. an end to Father Power's bright shilling but if I bought a book with it, ; Pd ha
504. resolutely awuy. " Nor cast one longing, lingering look behind." There was a bo
505. awuy. " Nor cast one longing, lingering look behind." There was a bookseller's
506. book " for the low price of one shilling." Peter had a wholesome distrust of Pro
507. y purchase, Peter now and then reminding him that he could not go higher than a
508. t he could not go higher than a shilling. Sometimes, when the title on the cover
509. n «,nd it round and round, scrutinizing it closely, saying to himself, " I wish
510. d round, scrutinizing it closely, saying to himself, " I wish I knew whether it
511. timidly. "You may have it for a shilling, though it ought to be one and sixpence
512. nd sixpence." Peter thanked the obliging shopman, and walked away with his book
513. th his book till in his pocket, thinking every minute an hour, he got home to sh
514. d exultingly pro- duced his prize. " ing his elder son, " Now, Mike," said their
515. I don't. no head could for the learning, You know mother says 1 have is it, mot
516. u say never get any further than reading his prayer- book." you blockhead," said
517. blockhead," said the mother, pretending to look for a slender stick, which she
518. c tell. husband), "haven't you something for ?" I," him hide to do out-bye " Ay,
519. Ay, indeed have said the father, turning a smile, " any boy that won't learn, aw
520. d, indeed, but kind-hearted, and willing to oblige whenever it was in his power.
521. had been rather wild and fond of taking a glass, but of late and become well to
522. o say himself, " he had always something by him for a sore foot,* and never knew
523. knew the years he had left off drinking, want of a shilling, thanks be to God."
524. ad left off drinking, want of a shilling, thanks be to God." Leaving Daniel and
525. f a shilling, thanks be to God." Leaving Daniel and h's son hard at work in the
526. at work in the stable, and Peter reading Robinson Crusoe to his mother, while 6h
527. wn, of course, to his father, contriving to elude his mother's suspicions by som
528. e suspected, or even her mother, fearing ; the conse- quences for her brother hi
529. father's money-drawer if knows something about all I don't. It's not for nothing
530. about all I don't. It's not for nothing you get those nice things, not to speak
531. those nice things, not to speak of going to the theatre, nights, as I ! needn't,
532. " Know you do Harry I ; see you're going to deny it, but you ?" said it's no use
533. ugh for you to know ; and I'm just going to Just then mother this very day." Sam
534. m by. There was at all times " a lurking devil in his eye," a look of sly, cold
535. ver suspects his shiners. you of tipping He's a great old coon, I guess." " Why,
536. guess." " Why, how could he see anything clear ?" cried Sam, in with his bitter
537. whereupon West took to his heels, having no fancy for fighting when though he co
538. his heels, having no fancy for fighting when though he could bluster and it cam
539. hurry, Ezechiel ?" said Harry, laughing, Can't you wait awhile ?" But Ezechiel
540. But Ezechiel was already out of hearing, and Harry drew the terrified Eliza awa
541. in the direction of their home, leaving his prostrate foe to be picked up by a
542. picked up by a gentleman who was passing at the time. n Terrible fellows these P
543. Sir ?" inquired Sam, as he stood shaking the dust from II off his clothes. I say
544. he has a peculiar way of then, settling a question with the Keep clear him, arm
545. ue. if you value your bodily was mocking safety." Sam saw him, and his at a glan
546. his acquaintance, there- keen searching eye. He fore, rather suddenly, and spee
547. and speedily turned down a neigh- boring alley, without as much as thanking the
548. oring alley, without as much as thanking the gentleman for his trouble. An old I
549. ce for your reverence to be see& talking with a poor old body like me," said Mol
550. old body like me," said Molly, bend ing over her table, and letting her voice f
551. ly, bend ing over her table, and letting her voice fall almost to a whisper, " I
552. whole week round, an' ; I see everything that's goin' on an' mind I tell you, de
553. t same you !" business. Good the evening, and may God /ou long This last " An' y
554. t got followed with her eye the receding form of the priest. Harry and Eliza had
555. a had their father home, and were giving and mother an account of what had happe
556. ow.er was " without in the shop, wanting to see the master." Miles hurried out t
557. d the il little parlor to see everything in it's place. Eliza, put that pitcher
558. Hush, now, not a word How they're coming in." do you do, Mrs. Blake ?" said Dr.
559. thanks to your reverence quietly taking possession of a chair. well, ; won't yo
560. , thank after fist you, I prefer sitting here; I feel my walk. warn So, Harry, y
561. warn So, Harry, you have been practising yoa to-day," he said, with a smile. 86
562. nd pray, Mr. Blake, what do you standing jp tor religion ?" said the priest, coo
563. ch it." " What " do I call sir, standing up for religion V repeated Miles. Why.
564. attacks Lis that's what I call standing up for it." religion ; " Well, ing your
565. nding up for it." religion ; " Well, ing your my is frieud, that is it is one wa
566. one way, certainly, of defendfrom being the best way." religion, but far " How
567. and most efficacious is way of defending your religion to practise its duties an
568. principles in all your actions. By doing so you make your religion respected, wi
569. religion respected, without ever having occasion to strike a blow, whereas you
570. ol. 87 had any, is either gone, or going fast in these angry discussions to whic
571. isit, but I must insist on your removing your children from the baneful influenc
572. baneful influence of Protestant teaching, and fhe companionship of Protestant ch
573. e V with " Because,'' said Miles, trying to keep " because there's too down his
574. t the If reli- place to learn everything that to be learned. it will gion be exc
575. hen you are quite right if you are doing. Mrs. Blake, would you have the goodnes
576. rooms. " I'm sure he has heard something ?" whispered Harry 14 to Eliza. ! Hush
577. s business. I wish he wouldn't be coming here putting bad into father's head aga
578. wish he wouldn't be coming here putting bad into father's head against us." "Ar
579. d Dr. Power, " that habit of frequenting the theatre ?" in the "The theatre, Fat
580. ible ! How could he in for get money ing, go to the theatre ?" — people don't
581. d discover that your son has been taking advantage of your credulity, and betray
582. vantage of your credulity, and betraying your trust — that he has not much rel
583. e boys sport, yet, their sport attending St. Peter's School, and though some of
584. tronized mixed schools, are with growing up, without fear of God or rery few exc
585. d or rery few exceptions, man, despising their parents in their hearts, and beco
586. ir parents in their hearts, and becoming, from day to day, more reckless of duty
587. es who, like you, religion. Good evening, Mr. Blake if I have given you but a ca
588. lake if I have given you but a cankering wound cannot pain I am sorry for it God
589. it God grant you be healed without being well probed. ; ; grace to profit by my
590. , as seems he does, without your knowing it ; or is it possible that you'd conni
591. s he makes a trade of that's — robbing me, the graceless vagabond what he get
592. an ! — Go and forgot the other evening !" " For God's sake, Miles," said Mrs.
593. Come down here, you young rap," raising his voice to its highest pitch, " come
594. rs. Blake made a great show of searching for the whip, but somehow it was not fo
595. whip, but somehow it was not forthcoming. Harry made that he'll ! his appearance
596. th. " Well, now," said Miles, his fixing a withering look on son, " ain't you a
597. now," said Miles, his fixing a withering look on son, " ain't you a precious you
598. ? my Not hands, and me never suspecting you of such tricks a word out of your h
599. w but you may as ! I see the lies coming up well swallow them down not dare to M
600. nks on sure, at 11 me ! He in was making maps, to be Mr. Thomson's." is Who taki
601. aps, to be Mr. Thomson's." is Who taking my name vain here ?" said a voice from
602. from one to another, " Is there anything wrong ?" Yes, there is, Mr. Thomson," s
603. said Miles quickly, " there is something wrong, and very wrong." And he 11 proce
604. h goes to the theatre most every evening, and yet I'm quite as anxious to bring
605. g, and yet I'm quite as anxious to bring him up well, as you can be about Harry.
606. d is place for a boy to spend an evening deal to be learned there. there a gieat
607. oo bad, I grant you, ; but your whipping him over here, time, will will do no go
608. remember a certain long account standing over against Ins name Mr. Thomson's boo
609. my IN NEED. said 93 Mr. Thomson, making a sign to Harry and Eliza to go up stai
610. Eliza to go up stairs. my good "Swearing is highly offensive to God. Oh swear, d
611. o you intend him V sir. " I was thinking of bir.ding him to a trade, now almost
612. him V sir. " I was thinking of bir.ding him to a trade, now almost with not min
613. e's not it's near as far on his learning as he ought to be, his own fault and He
614. t begin to earn wrong, Miles, his living." "You quite wrong!" said Thomson, with
615. that deserves " A Mr. boy in- something better than a trade. ? Why not give him
616. well to make Harry a would be a burning shame to glue him to a bench or an anvi
617. demurred on the score of expense, saying all money he had to carry on his busine
618. now I in another predicament. " Nothing better planned, Mr. Thomson," advice as
619. while ago, and he gave me such a rating for not sending Harry to the school bel
620. he gave me such a rating for not sending Harry to the school belonging to our ch
621. ot sending Harry to the school belonging to our church, that I as good as made u
622. nly they have such a A'n't way of coming it over their people. you a better judg
623. hesitated, in the habit are, of obeying our priests — they're wiser than we M
624. homson was seized with a troublesome ing, so that he could not last he said, '*
625. s ' may very well in his pulpit, talking about the religion' (there lon's voice,
626. oice, mysteries of was a certain mocking tone in Mr Thomwhich Miles was not shar
627. but when self is the it comes to chosing a school don't ; your sen, your- proper
628. at Dr. Power did say, for fear of giving offence to his valued observed Miles }
629. to it. have great trouble in remembering came to the rescue with, "To tell you t
630. are afraid of Harry and Eliza forgetting their religion. They say, sir, that Pro
631. t have produced. "You see, sir," forcing in a smile, "that a wrong sense ; my go
632. id of their people J guess it's becoming wiser and more learned than themselves.
633. themselves. ever, I How- am only losing my time. Am I to understand, Miles, tha
634. Miles, that you have resolved on sending your son to that school in Barclay stre
635. on was hardly meant Thomson's ear, being made ?" in an under-tone. " How Oh ! in
636. so he went out with Mr. Thomson, leaving his wife in no very pleasant humor. Bhe
637. ly interested listeners to the foregoing conversation. whisper, " you see in " T
638. his best of it. I've no notion of making a baby of myself at this ; time of day,
639. of myself at this ; time of day, saying my catechism and such stufif I guess I'
640. ss I've had enough of that kind of thing." Eliza administered another gentle rep
641. ittle, gone now. I say, Eliza !" raising nis voice a " where's that book you pro
642. d, or mother will hear you ;" and taking a key from a certain corner in the clos
643. ed a drawer in a small bureau belonging to Instruriive herself, and handed on t
644. brother a very handsome volume, bearing : its back the promising title Static*
645. volume, bearing : its back the promising title Static* for Houng* 5 98 ** BLAKE8
646. Davison's rewards," s&ifl Marry laughing, " and a very pretty reward it is too.
647. , to be sure," at the same time pointing downwards. Eliza either was, affected t
648. , affected to be, quite angry. Snatching the book out of her brother's hand, she
649. orrigible boy " And what will I be doing, ? ! think you, while you're telling mo
650. ing, ? ! think you, while you're telling mother your fine story Han't I got some
651. er your fine story Han't I got something now ! to tell as well as you " ? —ha
652. at last it's !" not as bo wicked a thing to take to steal ^premium when one gets
653. he priest. I don't care if Harry, seeing the turn things were taking, began to s
654. arry, seeing the turn things were taking, began to soothe his sister as well as
655. is sister as well as he could, promising to be a better boy for the time to come
656. what are yon about up I bear you talking very loud," i FRIEND me some fist fN of
657. ons, 99 mother," cried u Eiiza's hearing my Harry, shaking his admonishingly at
658. ried u Eiiza's hearing my Harry, shaking his admonishingly at his sister. "Dear
659. l. me a hand with this sheet I'm hemming, soon have to go and see about the supp
660. he supper." In the course of the evening, Tim Flanagan came to ask the Blakes "
661. m while you and Mr. Thomson were talking and, upon my word, they were so busy at
662. cut the matter to call short by ordering " the children" to get on their hats. M
663. as much for Miles. But Miles was getting up in the world, and it couldn't be exp
664. , while Mrs. Blake was up stairs, taking off her bonnet and shawl. The remark, t
665. ry conversation. Mrs. Reilly's besetting sin, Family pride was and Dan Sheridan
666. rds might produce. Mrs. Reilly, bridling think the likes of us, The likes of us,
667. 'Flyn, said, the very day of the wedding, and between you and me, Dan, he wasn't
668. tween you and me, Dan, he wasn't willing to go to the wedding at all, only just
669. , he wasn't willing to go to the wedding at all, only just for shame's cause. Th
670. Sally, I did not what was it ? anything about between ourselves, ! ; and Tim wi
671. , it's ready with your joke. no laughing matter family. it to speak slightingly
672. cent old Mary, little let us say nothing more about is I But here's know she's a
673. she didn't a Flanagan." " Why you bring the children, Jenny, said Mrs. Flanagan
674. n, Jenny, said Mrs. Flanagan, addressing Mrs. Sheridan. "Oh, Peter couldn't be r
675. d him in all He the it mud while sousing was was he had a new suit of clothes on
676. at all to Mike," replied He did nothing Dan. "You see onr boys, and young Dillo
677. ung Dillon, and Ned here, were all going home together, at least part of the way
678. least part of the way, Sisters belonging to St. Peter's School passed a great hu
679. set, Dillon, " with their demure-looking faces, and their queer bonnets. AVt if
680. wn went Dillon into the gutter, shouting sorts not to spoil his new call clothes
681. his new call clothes. Some folks passing began to rate Mike, and out for the con
682. rate, amongst themselves to say nothing about it till they'd see whether old Di
683. " he came to my place that very evening in a great passion, and threatened all
684. y laughed at him, you tell you one thing, my good man," a while, or send him to
685. py, Tim, but he the house without saying another word, — FRIEND IN A NEE D. 10
686. air. of Edward's. much Were you speaking to me, Mr. Sheridan head with a half-co
687. a half-conscious " I ?" said he, raising his was speaking to you, Mister Blake,"
688. " I ?" said he, raising his was speaking to you, Mister Blake," I said Dan, wort
689. Blake," I said Dan, worth with a knowing smile, "but what said wasn't much. We'r
690. We're all of us a little hard of hearing at times. Ahem." There was a laugh at H
691. m " anxiously, for, with their bickering hi* on the school question, he had a gr
692. 104 " BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. Why, nothing in the world but that they have been ma
693. the world but that they have been making me a trustee of St. Peter's Church. Bec
694. tisfaction, the self-grauilation lurking beneath. Dan was disposed to friend Mil
695. long in Ireland, man, where such a thing as a trustee was never heard of? You kn
696. s clergy, and so there must be something wrocg, though belief, can't tell you wh
697. elt ditch, for it's 1 away an old saying and a true one, hack goes under his bel
698. ept Miles and his wife, the lattef being somewhat elated at the new dignity conf
699. rustee. L05 Miles, to hear of your being made a Tim Flana- man that would speak
700. like two brothers." There was no getting beyond this, so Tim was fain to appear
701. Dillon's ?" " No, I heard it's nothing of it ; but, mind you, Tim, it if anyth
702. it ; but, mind you, Tim, it if anything about the schools, you may keep to your
703. You know ; of old there's no use beating about the of it, bush " you'll make not
704. ut the of it, bush " you'll make nothing I" I promise you." Go to — Galloway y
705. d Tim, half-jest, and whole have nothing to mind but your Take my word for it, y
706. story, and Miles made a show of " being highly exasperated against young Dillon
707. . He was always a wild, good-for-nothing fellow," said he. 11 Begging your pardo
708. for-nothing fellow," said he. 11 Begging your pardon," said Tim, stopping him, w
709. Begging your pardon," said Tim, stopping him, when I knew him first, about ten y
710. pn> ; — — — ! mised to say nothing about the schools, and with God's help
711. at least. This is no tima for squabbling come, draw over to the table and try Th
712. t HOUSEHOLD. .As we ha^c taken a passing glance it at the femala school, ^o?eiLe
713. these — spirit of the Order, actuating and regulating all their actions, leave
714. t of the Order, actuating and regulating all their actions, leaves little room f
715. e was a woman of excellent understanding; with a strong 108 B LAKES AND FLANAGAN
716. ges of edufirst cation, her family being one of the in her native county. Had sh
717. on metaphysics or philosophy. But being a Catholic, as I have said, and born in
718. ld- fashioned Catholic notions regarding feminine modesty and Christian humilitv
719. he was taught to consider human learning as a mere accessory to the grand scienc
720. education. So instead light," of blazing forth, " a burning and a shining ter on
721. ad light," of blazing forth, " a burning and a shining ter on reaching the age o
722. blazing forth, " a burning and a shining ter on reaching the age of maturity, Si
723. a burning and a shining ter on reaching the age of maturity, Sisto take the ver
724. Magdalen thought proper step of retiring from the world with all her natural and
725. erized by •' Her speech where dazzling intellect Was softened by Christian mee
726. Sister Magdalen was indeed a ministering angel. Such was — THE sisters' school
727. rtiality, yet she could not help feeling a peculiar interest little in in Susan,
728. and was besides so fond and so endearing, that Sister Mary-Teresa could not help
729. Sister Mary-Teresa could not help loving her more than all the rest. strange, th
730. ther children said, But that was nothing for dear little Susy was at to the pet
731. the pet of the whole school. One morning, about a week after the social meeting
732. g, about a week after the social meeting Tim Flanagan's, the two little girls we
733. a look at the pictures in school, hoping to get in before any of the others, in
734. rather these pictures, had been running in their heads ever since one memorable
735. to However, while Ellie stood listening to the mild admonition of the good Sist
736. ne together. Ellie would " give anything in the world to see those pictures," an
737. and get in very, very early some morning, and then we can other more worldly sch
738. e can other more worldly schools nothing. ; ; look at them so nicely before any
739. is after Isn't is too bad, and we coming " What the matter with my little Susy m
740. the matter with my little Susy mornu ing ?" said the soft voice of Sister Mary-T
741. iooks as though there She were something wrong." " Don't tell her ?" whispered E
742. but we can't get a we came this morning ever so early you and Sister Magdalen a
743. cheerfully given, whereupon the smiling Sister took the two children with littl
744. he pictures, the two older girls drawing near when they lished with heard of the
745. ime most of the in were in and listening to the stories, but an instant were on
746. ut an instant were on their knees facing towards the large crucifix head of the
747. ster Magdalen's seat. ai the The morning prayers were said aloud by Sister Mary-
748. , Angelical tion, the Saluta- •ffering and the Angelus, ending with a short of
749. luta- •ffering and the Angelus, ending with a short of the actions of the day
750. -Teresa and her infant class, consisting of about twenty children. " Well, child
751. dren I" said all the good Sister, seeing them properly settled in their places,
752. the first girl, Sally Doyle, step- ping forward and pointing out the place in t
753. y Doyle, step- ping forward and pointing out the place in the book held by the n
754. o receive, to keep, or to covet anything belonging to our neighbor, either publi
755. to keep, or to covet anything belonging to our neighbor, either publicly ©r pr
756. SISTERS' SCHOOL. jrou 113 take anything from any one without his knowledge and
757. V f nun quickly, " you are now breaking another commandment." Hush, hush, siste
758. y the eighth commandment ?" " Backbiting, calumny " "And likely to ful detractio
759. detraction," put in Alice Brady, seeing Mary break clown ' ; also all words and
760. w perceive, how you broke the eighth ing as you did, regarding your cousin? comm
761. oke the eighth ing as you did, regarding your cousin? commandment, by speakYou s
762. sister, I did not," said Ellie, looking up with a brighter face. " Well, then,
763. d the Catechismal lesson of that morning. quarter of an hour was thus passed, an
764. ay calcu- amount of good effected during that short time ? who may tell what pre
765. of parents friends, ay I even the loving heart of God ! — Ah God I a pitiable
766. t of God ! — Ah God I a pitiable thing to hear Catholic parents com- plain of
767. parents com- plain of so much time being lost in Catholic schools in ! teaching
768. g lost in Catholic schools in ! teaching and learning the Christian doctrine —
769. holic schools in ! teaching and learning the Christian doctrine —Time J What I
770. rd with double the abyss of never-ending woe. If cur children are not taught the
771. It happened to make some remark evening, just after supper, reference to Miles'
772. ily were assembled in the little sitting room, or rather kitchen their lessons f
773. ns for the The young people were conning over ing while for ensuing day, and Mrs
774. e The young people were conning over ing while for ensuing day, and Mrs. Flanaga
775. were conning over ing while for ensuing day, and Mrs. Flanagan sat knitting her
776. uing day, and Mrs. Flanagan sat knitting her stock- Tim read aloud sigh. Gobinet
777. an with affectionate solicitude. Nothing at all, Nfclly, only I was just thinkin
778. at all, Nfclly, only I was just thinking of them poor children of Mary's. They g
779. their mother does all she can to getting " make them read good books at home, th
780. them now, she doesn't like to be telling their father " *' seems, and all the ti
781. does the child mean V said Tim, opening his eyes wide, and fixing them on his d
782. d Tim, opening his eyes wide, and fixing them on his daughter. " Wby, father, Ed
783. hter. " Wby, father, Edw*w4 fc something bad aboil' «?9f m$ the eighth 11 What
784. day at Catechism, that that is breaking the eighth com- mandment." and mother e
785. to your mother, think she has something in her pocket for you. you have your le
786. in the fear and love of God, a blessing to their parents, and to each other. We
787. over their heads, their bodies improving in health and strength, and their minds
788. did. Her mother tried to con- by telling her that in a couple of years more she
789. wo years about it, be long it in passing. Don't be thinking the sooner. it Susy,
790. be long it in passing. Don't be thinking the sooner. it Susy, and will pass all
791. AND FLANAGANS. knew neither book-keeping, grammar, nor geography, when I started
792. at matter ; but, never mind, I'm getting along well enough without them, thanks
793. aid to Daniel God !" Sheridan, who owing had, of late, become ing a " bosom cron
794. idan, who owing had, of late, become ing a " bosom crony " of Tim's, to the incr
795. Dan, " I wish to goodness his schooling as hand out of an illhe was anything li
796. ing as hand out of an illhe was anything like as far on with your Ned is ; but t
797. though he's a poor hand at the learning to be a wild harum-scarum fellow as he
798. ful son. To be sure he's fond of kicking up shines, and keeps us all in hotwater
799. eridan and Thomas Flanagan were learning Latin, on Dr. Power's recommendation. T
800. sposition, and both desirous of becoming piests. were well pleased with their ch
801. Flanagan's. left Tom was own Mr. verging on sixteen when he school at his reques
802. n when he school at his request, telling his mother that he was as far on as Lan
803. sides, mother/' Tom, high time was doing something fortune, for vou and mvself.
804. her/' Tom, high time was doing something fortune, for vou and mvself. see, I'm b
805. you for mother, and you've been toiling and saving so long to keep me at school
806. ther, and you've been toiling and saving so long to keep me at school that must
807. at school that must try and do something " you me. in return." God bless you, wi
808. " It it's you that with me, do something dear, was low days Tom when I took to s
809. low days Tom when I took to sick-nursing, necessity has no law. Them but sure, d
810. to forgive God — speak of Eliza going to that grand boarding-school up town w
811. ak of Eliza going to that grand boarding-school up town with the two Miss Thomso
812. ood head of cattle, and came home riding in her sidesaddle. She did indeed, Tom
813. 1 ever tell you about the great w edding they had ?" ! — — — r 11 Oh, yes,
814. ld me all about it," said Tom, unwilling to break off too suddenly from his dign
815. , Tom, and I suppose you'll be want- ing this penny of money." Rising up, she we
816. e want- ing this penny of money." Rising up, she went to her box, took out her p
817. took out her preIt cupboard, and opening a little tin cious store, the savings o
818. d over again, into Tom's hand. reckoning, she astray. After the second gave it u
819. ay. After the second gave it up, finding herself two dollars " There, Tom, count
820. , you're a better scholar than I am. ing, None of us was ever very bright all ex
821. ight, mother. This !" is the begin- ning of 11 my fortune. so, Mind dear that, I
822. her, and well- disposed to earn a living for himself and her. little He was a we
823. ured to be ; small in stature possessing, but self respected, his manner, too, s
824. nner, too, sure, and rather was anything but pre- still he somehow contrived to
825. him- and had early got the name of being careful and industrious. In money matte
826. made it pulously to regular in attending Mass, and a point go to eoufesslon and
827. and communion once a quarter, including the Christmas and Easter duty. Dr. Powe
828. tered fully into the spirit of the thing, he used to regular old little say that
829. the in his peculiar turn of mind, having buoyancy or elasticity oi youth, and mu
830. h, and no stranger could imagine feeling His heart alone had the freshness what
831. sfriends, same age, and, notwithstanding position, they were always very good to
832. generally seen Edward was a fine-looking young fellow, giving promise, at sixtee
833. was a fine-looking young fellow, giving promise, at sixteen, of great lar stren
834. ous turn, is, Edward Flanagan of reading, that provided the book were not too la
835. ** and her wonderful agency, from lizing the nations ; first to last in evangein
836. e sit was spent fathers. in such reading, and he could hour after hour pondering
837. , and he could hour after hour pondering over the strange fortunes of the land o
838. Vicar-General of a young and struggling diocese, and the harassing cares of his
839. nd struggling diocese, and the harassing cares of his ministry, the in still fon
840. ve given Genius, and truth, and learning, vainly vast, To call her olden glories
841. good-humored, that better it for liking so was impossible not to like him, than
842. and and He had he was Thus, the teaching of his worthy Pastor, the * J. Aogoitua
843. n in a state of transition, just passing from childhood to that mature age, vary
844. om childhood to that mature age, varying tively ladies when they are respecknown
845. es. Miles Blake had the habit of calling him People had somehow got into Mr. Bla
846. o Mr. Blake, and when any one, presuming on very old acquaintance, did address h
847. ld seem, wholly THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING- SCHOOL. nnfii for 125 the office they
848. from year to year, debts were gathering like a thunder-cloud over the doomed ch
849. of trustee. nearly all evaporated during these eventful seven years What good wi
850. e her honors somewhat more meekly, owing mainly to the fact that she, unlike her
851. t that she, unlike her husband, awaiting circumstances to went at times Miles. t
852. cknowledge, did carry her head something higher than in the good old times ; fal
853. hip, not to speak of the honor reverting from her "highly-accomplished" children
854. e tall, thin, and rather cynical-looking gentleman I have now to introduce. The
855. ed at Columbia College, after completing his preparatory studies under Mr. Simps
856. rivals in renown, Harry observed, making a somewhat forced application of Scott'
857. nd Pythias, and THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. 121 ware divided into two parti
858. escended to go in time for the beginning of Mass. was always over, and sometimes
859. k possession of his seat (after kneeling for a second or so), to remain during t
860. ng for a second or so), to remain during the where he took good care remainder o
861. d care remainder of the service, bending one knee at the elevation as a mere mat
862. ully on left the side of the pew, taking good care to exhibit a costly topaz whi
863. the most consummate nonchalance, bowing and smiling to any lady-acquaintance wh
864. nsummate nonchalance, bowing and smiling to any lady-acquaintance whose stray gl
865. into a slight, graceful girl, retaining much of her early fragility of appearan
866. make her what is called genteel-looking. Her features bore the impress of her I
867. ions. Notwiththat spoke of they standing the grievous disadvantage under which E
868. age under which Eliza labored, in having been all along through the unaccount- a
869. een. She had grown up under the teaching of " dear Miss Davison," and in the soc
870. see such a girl spoiled as she — thing of everything, without obtaining a real
871. l spoiled as she — thing of everything, without obtaining a real knowledge of
872. thing of everything, without obtaining a real knowledge of anything in particu
873. t obtaining a real knowledge of anything in particular, except it might be calle
874. ight be called the whole art of charming, or some such science. eight or ten gra
875. wonder; ease and rapidity she could sing all the popular songs from Casta Diva t
876. histories, no, THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. Dot one, but what difference di
877. est, expressed a wish to learn something more about Ireland, Mrs. Danby, the pri
878. ve never been distinguished for anything except ferocity and superstition, so th
879. se histories were considered interesting and worthy " Nonsense, child 1" cried h
880. , to li how could yon think of comparing Ireland Greece —the classic land J 6*
881. eacher with her to speak to most winning in smile, " and I was wrong you is such
882. fearfully delicate that the least thing excites me. And, besides, I am so excee
883. s not permitted was only fact, it losing time learning such old trumpery music.
884. d was only fact, it losing time learning such old trumpery music. In Irish, and
885. trumpery music. In Irish, and everything Cathowas studiously excluded from Mrs.
886. be, a high-toned institution, professing to cultivate the intellect, and to stre
887. the proud distinction of always keeping up with the improvements of the age, so
888. o that, as a seemed as though everything matter of course, everything antiquated
889. everything matter of course, everything antiquated or old-fashioned, was at onc
890. d by Mrs. Dauby, her husband the writing-master, and her two elegant assistants,
891. my from time to THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. dine, just in a friendly 131 wa
892. confession some five or six times during the three years she spent at Mrs. Danby
893. too just, and she could not help envying those who had not to go to confession.
894. go to confession. The poison was making slow but certain progress in her mind,
895. by a grand entertainment. some dwelling Henry's in Mr. Blake had purchased a ha
896. nxious for the opportunity of exhibiting at one end the same time, her new house
897. and it was arranged that on the evening of " the party," the comconsist- eanv s
898. , and ZachThen Jane Thomson was to fiing a duet with Eliza, and Arabella, who wa
899. ht of the audience. The whole was to ing of Eliza on the piano, aiy the violin.
900. vertissement. These matters itself being all duly considered, the whole family r
901. this Henry and Eliza demurred, alleging that their uncle Tim and his family wou
902. nagans could be asked some other evening by themselves. Well ! but you know they
903. ut in Miles, " you can't get over asking them. If you didn't they'd think themse
904. the unpleasant consequences of bringing them and the others together. If you in
905. up an faave all Irish party some evening, and then you can drawing herself up, y
906. y some evening, and then you can drawing herself up, your friends/' friends !" s
907. ycur friends." THE FASHION IdLE BOARDING-SCHOOL "I did not say so, ; 43 his moth
908. that one never knows when he I trampling on your corns. I Be pacified, good moth
909. s. Blake's heightened color and lowering brow denoted an approaching squall, but
910. and lowering brow denoted an approaching squall, but Eliza interposed with her a
911. any company, and that Thomas is getting edurj/.ion for a priest rest ? and the
912. rest ? and the little girls are learning music *md all the ?" — what more do y
913. hat more do you want more on ; " Nothing their part, mother," said Henry, cuttin
914. their part, mother," said Henry, cutting her short " they are all very well in t
915. own way." hi? son, Miles had the casting-vote course, the head of —a graciousl
916. d, 134 his BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. sitting ; mother by " in pouting silence, with
917. NAGANS. sitting ; mother by " in pouting silence, with a face that it seemed to
918. ve your own way to — I'll hare nothing more to do with it." But she had someth
919. re to do with it." But she had something more do with it, for the next day she w
920. r the next day she was busy from morning to night preparing the house for the re
921. was busy from morning to night preparing the house for the reception of the dist
922. pper was to be supplied by a neighboring coufectioner, who was •' also to furn
923. two maid- servants of Mrs. Blake, being Irish, as a matter of course, had store
924. ion of the great party. Instead of being annoyed at the slight put upon them by
925. ucHappily for them all, ceeded in making them laugh too. they could afford to la
926. ith Edward m a parties. John was serving his time to the trade ot THE FASHIONABL
927. to the trade ot THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. feather-dressing in his 13* fat
928. ONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. feather-dressing in his 13* father's shop, with two othe
929. *>d answered assist his father in making; and began latterly to little the neces
930. n of? the store, and, Edward the selling when neces department-. Thus i% ; was t
931. nto each other's hands thej" had nothing to pay out to strangers, except the tri
932. ay out to strangers, except the trifling wages given to the apprentices, and wha
933. m of money, and were Thomas was studying looked upon as a thriving family. for t
934. s was studying looked upon as a thriving family. for the priesthood, and had alr
935. od useful their Sisters, and were making a steady, lot a very rapiS progress, in
936. es of a good and They were both learning music, and brother Edward had made ther
937. se of exercises, and could play and sing most of Moore's Melodies, " without eve
938. Moore's Melodies, " without ever looking at the music." She could also sing some
939. oking at the music." She could also sing some of the beautiful hymns of the Chur
940. y said, lin, so " they weren't depending on any one for arnusemeut. They could a
941. d.'' in themselves without ever crossing their And so they could, for they were
942. near them. all There's no use bothering them when they're busy with their grand
943. It isn't that I care about their making of us — for, thank God, that's what t
944. hen her husband was gone ; M your joking will do them as little good now, as you
945. her head oat of the parlor-door, telling her to be quick, for she wrj fHK FASHIO
946. ck, for she wrj fHK FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. lure there was 131 some visitor
947. o you remember Mary ?" he added, seating himself on a handsome ottoman just oppo
948. e ottoman just opposite the door leading to the back-parlor, or dining-room. " N
949. or leading to the back-parlor, or dining-room. " No —no — oh how ! what am I
950. " No —no — oh how ! what am I saying ? — to be sure I i do Tf and Mrs. Bla
951. s. I short people's memories are growing now- often when poor Phelim and myself
952. elim and myself were a parr of strapping gossoons, vieing with each other to see
953. ere a parr of strapping gossoons, vieing with each other to see who'd have his r
954. rty little bare-footed gerska, gathering for six spades at a time. We weren't we
955. cheer, and good decent country clothing ; &11 that, there was peace in our hear
956. here was a seriousness, almost amounting to solemnity, in Tim's voice, and his f
957. ND FLANAGANS of expression b.ick pitying tenderness, as memory brought " The day
958. or hia " Why, Tim, a sermon you're going a queer time to give us ?" she said, ta
959. ll about the party. Here I am, clavering and talking about things that are not f
960. party. Here I am, clavering and talking about things that are not fit to be men
961. ioned in such a house as this," glancing round on the tastefully-furnished apart
962. t griddle, as I see you I was forgetting all about the business that brought me
963. pect either Nelly or myself this evening. As for Edward, he's engaged to spend t
964. dward, he's engaged to spend the evening with Dr. Power. sorry for having to dis
965. evening with Dr. Power. sorry for having to disappoint you, helped. It I'm be bu
966. at do you mean, Tim what are you talking about ?" and she threw an arm-chair, ac
967. she threw an arm-chair, actually panting for breath. " herself into What am ; I
968. eath. " herself into What am ; I talking about ?" said Tim, taking up a it fan w
969. am ; I talking about ?" said Tim, taking up a it fan which lay on a table near h
970. lay on a table near him, and presenting his sister to " there, Mary, dear, you'
971. r to " there, Mary, dear, you're getting weak, I'm little, afraid— fan yoursel
972. stay it'll —take — here's a smelling a snuff of it, and bring you to in a TH
973. re's a smelling a snuff of it, and bring you to in a THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SC
974. ing you to in a THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. jitfy. 139 What was sure ?" I t
975. L. jitfy. 139 What was sure ?" I talking about ? why, about the party, to be i(
976. that his can accept kind and flattering invitation. Give my ; compliments to hi
977. care and don't overheat yourself dancing to-night." But, Tim," said his sister,
978. ." But, Tim," said his sister, following him to the door great confusion, " did
979. ink of Baid Tim, with the same provoking I. smile. ! " I'll Mary dear !" You kno
980. the Mrs. Blake was gomg to say something in reply, per- haps to make an excuse,
981. , but Tim made his exit hastily, drawing the door after him with a clap that ran
982. air all over This brought Eliza tripping in papers, down stabs, her done up and
983. 140 asked, BI.AKE3 AND FLANAGANS. seeing the confusion still visible on the usua
984. Tim good for I didn't get a it. worrying no poor unfortunate it's woman what eve
985. had stood it out I on Tim's people being invited, wouldn't have had to go throug
986. . parlor-door, Henry," she said, meeting him at the "did you, or did you not, in
987. eal, Why, how came you I to such a thing ? —do you suppose that have my senses
988. s" Why, goodness me I respectful bearing of her children. your Uncle Tim has jus
989. hat none of them could come this evening. You may be sure I was astonished, and
990. em, and he told me you " did ; remarking at the same time, that it was very kind
991. was very kind ,, and very condescending on your part. THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-
992. g on your part. THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. Henry and Elka exchanged laughe
993. . I" said Harry ; He I has been quizzing you. of honor I didn't invite I pledge
994. ractical joke, so that there was nothing to disturb the cheerful serenity of his
995. of the scene, came a tle wife, chilling and from this remembrance of her brothe
996. elligent family, excluded social meeting by a caprice which she could their amia
997. , Thomson as they used to do." The thing that consoled her was the marked attent
998. eaves of her the piano, and keep turning the music HE SOIREE. By-and-bye it 143
999. 143 struck her that thers was something in more than politeness the rapt attent
1000.ble emotion. Now, if it be a great thing all out 1" And she wondered that before
1001.e glanced at Miles, where he was playing whist with Mr, and Mrs. Thomscri, and M
1002.i, and Mrs. Green. was at what was going on tified stealing a look occasionally
1003.was at what was going on tified stealing a look occasionally from under his bent
1004.ng were to I see have given us something of that kind." And I thought so, too,"
1005.stood. Zachary looked and Eliza blushing all still look for some particular piec
1006.irit of mischief, " there he sits moping in that corner, turning over in his min
1007.e he sits moping in that corner, turning over in his mind his opening charge for
1008.er, turning over in his mind his opening charge for to-mor- Zachary knew very we
1009.£ business on his own account, pleading a most interesting case with Jane Pears
1010.own account, pleading a most interesting case with Jane Pearson for judge and ju
1011.se next term. There's a judgment pending over somebody," he added in a low voice
1012.hat corner ixo ; your eyes go a straying judge of your music let your fair clien
1013.; would not do there was a smile lurking around his in his mouth, and sparkling
1014.g around his in his mouth, and sparkling dark eyes, for, in his heart, in he was
1015.y's flute gave forth sounds of ravishing sweetness. So, at least, thought Jane P
1016.s a general outburst of applause, during which Eliza made her escape into the ba
1017.lor, where her mother was superintending the arrangement of Henry immediately le
1018.a partner for the of quadrilles. Dancing was kept up till a late, or rather an e
1019.past av d the future ia the intoxicating whirl of the waltz, and the slower, but
1020.their places at the card-tables, pausing at times to enjoy the sight of their ch
1021.d around on the size. assembly sparkling with costly rings, and gold chains, and
1022.and They saw in their chil- dren playing a distinguished part everything that wa
1023. playing a distinguished part everything that was going forward, whether music,
1024.inguished part everything that was going forward, whether music, dancing, or con
1025.as going forward, whether music, dancing, or conversation. They saw mirrors, and
1026.ed to have his share of the fun. Seizing his wife by the hand, he called out " E
1027.ion to laugh were Eliza and seen raising their handkerchiefs to their moutiw. He
1028. Eliza said her father ; " we're waiting for the music. and a light Now, Mary, y
1029.brother, " wonH you get them to laughing at them already " Well, 1 declare this
1030.chary ! yon can surely give us something of that kind en the fiddle —I mean th
1031. much with a flourish, and a deprecating glance at as to say : Eliza, as " you s
1032.?" I'm no particular, so at you anything at all will 4 ; * give us something tha
1033.hing at all will 4 ; * give us something that there's good footing in." THE SOIR
1034.e us something that there's good footing in." THE SOIREE " Well, here's the chor
1035.eavy she was light of foot, and catching a portion of her husband's joyous excit
1036.eemed to take a real pleasure in proving that Miles's retrospective compliment w
1037.l, country-dance, or cotillon —nothing — he that sort came wrong folks." As
1038.w-fangled dances, he'd left have nothing to say to them them to the young Henry
1039.d Eliza affected to be very busy looking over some music, but the scarlet hue of
1040.sensible of the misfor- \ tune of having " uneducated parents," that they were c
1041. ridicule of those friends them exposing themselves and associates whose opinion
1042. associates whose opinion was everything to them. Whether Jig, the company did i
1043.Jig, the company did it is, see anything ludicrous in the his wife, it is little
1044.. Their applaose too noisy in expressing their approbation. Bavored too strongly
1045.thers were so too. The plaudits greeting them on every side seemed no more than
1046.r due, so they never dreamed of doubting their sincerity. " That's not a bad jig
1047.o a seat. " But still it's not the thing. The old Fox-hunter's is worth a dozen
1048.chary assented with mock respect, adding with an equivocal smile, " I bow to you
1049.ally feel as if I But I wanted something after the hard work Who'll join me in I
1050. " I'm not at obliged to you for helping pa and ma 11 to make themselves ridicul
1051., about your father and mother retaining their old-fashioned There's nothing so
1052.ning their old-fashioned There's nothing so all. But I come, let us have a waltz
1053. ? see mother and the girls are thinking of going home ?" Eliza placed her hand
1054.ther and the girls are thinking of going home ?" Eliza placed her hand in his in
1055.ane Pearson from her Silas seat, nothing loath ; Green obtained the fair hand of
1056. the four couples were speedily whirling around the room to the tune of the Due
1057.nale exceedingly popular. of the evening's amusement. By the time the last coupl
1058. opened on his father and mother, asking them what on earth had pat it in their
1059.just what we deserve from him — paying his old deb*.." There was a withering c
1060.ng his old deb*.." There was a withering coldness or seen before, ard though in
1061.e ble. it out, he cculd not help feeling rather uncomforta- Mis. Blake took up t
1062. " Why, then, Henry Blake are you taking leave of your senses altogether ? If yo
1063.If you're not, I'm afraid it's something worse that's the matter with you, for t
1064.atter with you, for the devil's ! taking full possession of you. I have my eye o
1065.er and I all. What do you mean by saying that your selves ?" made fools of our-
1066. 1 know he annoyed to see folks laughing when you and pa were dancing." " And do
1067.ks laughing when you and pa were dancing." " And do you pretend to say that they
1068.u pretend to say that they were laughing at us ?" 11 demanded her ! father. it ;
1069.e with us ! Remember we're not depending on either of you, though you treat us a
1070.ven forbid Now, just mind what I'm going to tell you both as them of you, if you
1071.rs than to laugh at them that were doing their best to entertain them, you mav t
1072.rted to his feet, and com menced walking up and down the room with rapid strides
1073. for you, jigs you never danced anything but If that and reels, and such like ol
1074.re wouldn't be the curse is on dan- cing that there now. Our dancing never broug
1075.on dan- cing that there now. Our dancing never brought a it isn't s*o blush of s
1076.look at without shame. And another thing, you and your dandy brother there, can
1077.r for !" " Mother," said Henry, stopping short in his march, and planting himsel
1078.topping short in his march, and planting himself right in front of his parents,
1079.od night ! Bon soir t ma chert So saying, he left the room. What's that he's say
1080.e left the room. What's that he's saying ?" said his mother. " I suppose that's
1081.ll it in English," the frown to lowering on his brow it — " oh observed Miles,
1082.you in were, and make of us, by speaking a language we don't understand Ju&t as
1083.anguages, and his music, and his dancing— THE SOIREE. and his 153 all law into
1084.n, didn't ? come out of our hard earning — and I'll because we hadn't laid out
1085.sure, already on them, we must be giving a go bail, they'll on their account lau
1086. account laugh at us art I — gathering a faction of their friends to but never
1087.s," observed Mrs. " you were all turning up your noses at the Flanagans, and our
1088. fourth commandment." Eliza said nothing, but there was a smile curling her pret
1089.d nothing, but there was a smile curling her pretty lip, that, to a close observ
1090.p, that, to a close observer, of meaning. would have a world She kissed her fath
1091.oken the father and mother stood looking at ; each other with a sort of vacant s
1092.hip us in our old age only the beginning of it 1" The father shook Such was the
1093.of his head, but made no answer. evening. of that festive Achiag hearts and remo
1094.nsciences, and dreary forebodings coming evil : M The dark comciuning is with Go
1095.ings coming evil : M The dark comciuning is with God, The warning finm on high."
1096.dark comciuning is with God, The warning finm on high." Leaving the Blakes to re
1097. God, The warning finm on high." Leaving the Blakes to rest, if rest they could,
1098.us return to our Tim Flanagan. Returning home after his visit to Mrs. Blake, alr
1099.suit enough, und he wouldn't be spending his money foolishly. Still he vas quite
1100.ey foolishly. Still he vas quite willing for his mother to get the new gilk dres
1101.ave sumed Mrs. Flanagan, " I was telling — Edward about them 11 all here some
1102.s his kind heart said the father, wiping away a but tear, which had found its wa
1103.st have the the store now, and I'm going to it. speak to him about it, What day
1104. " Well, but I " Very well, this evening, then. want to go and ask them all." is
1105.m, as be BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. was going out, " tell Sally Iteilly and Jenny She
1106.renoon, to give me a hand at the cooking." When Tim and his sons came home to di
1107.irst, deci- dedly opposed to their being asked " and his father was Not that I o
1108.hardly worth the trouble of conciliating. ship of such people is but the shadow
1109.ts. Ever kind, and gentle, and forgiving, she had so of many excuses to offer on
1110.were delighted at the prospect of having their cousin Eliza a whole evening to p
1111.aving their cousin Eliza a whole evening to play and sing for them. 11 Only thin
1112.n Eliza a whole evening to play and sing for them. 11 Only think, father," said
1113. Ellie, " she has nevei spent an evening with us since she came home from school
1114.day, and we wanted her to play something for us, but Bhe said she had some lette
1115.sed to do," cried Susan, who was sitting on a little ; bench near the " she's no
1116.near the " she's not near grate, playing with a favorite kitten so kind as she s
1117. has become Miss Blake, and your romping playmate a young lady. She has been at
1118.m her whether the others will be willing come or is, not. If you'll do that part
1119.. ; " Oh, to bo sure, father the evening:.''' I'll see him in the course of Mr.
1120. Peter's School, the good old man having paid the debt of nature some three or f
1121.r four years before. These matters being his vest all arranged, Edward took out
1122. said he to Eliza affair. was forgetting a very important and Susan, I met a gir
1123.lapped their hands for joy, and, running up to their brother, threw their prms r
1124.ur Susan is !" said her brother, placing her on a low seat beside him " no matte
1125.APPY FAMILY. " J 59 "God's like blessing be about him, I if the fond mother, kno
1126.ather, are whom we love Well, you coming back to the store if not, John we may b
1127.swer : "As you sowed, so you are reaping as you brought ap your children, so you
1128.have them !" Bit still Tim kept thanking God, and praising his holy name, and wo
1129.till Tim kept thanking God, and praising his holy name, and wondering how he cam
1130.nd praising his holy name, and wondering how he came to be so highly fevored.
1131.Mrs. Reilly and Mrs. Sheridan, in making preparations for the coming festival. T
1132.n, in making preparations for the coming festival. Their joint experience in the
1133.another custards, jellies, Susan helping every one It and hlanc mange, Ellie and
1134.xcitement and joyous bustie from morning finished, till night. When all the nece
1135.ll night. When all the necessary cooking was Mrs. ReiRy and Mrs. Sheridan said t
1136.se, "made off home," as they was getting near dinner-time, and look-out for them
1137.a " Now mind and come early tell evening I" was Mrs. Flanagan's parting charge.
1138.l evening I" was Mrs. Flanagan's parting charge. "And, Sally I Torn not to forge
1139. he'll only have the trouble of trotting back w it As the two friends walked hom
1140.man in his dress and manners, and living for his family. And the boys — there'
1141.ite at home with him. There's a blessing on the same family, old and young !" '*
1142.e." I'm and the children must be getting hungry by : will "And poor Tom, dinner,
1143.m, dinner, till too — I was forgetting all it. about the Jenny 1" until you re
1144.ntil you reminded me of Good bye evening (62 B J. A K E S AND FLANA6AN8. last, W
1145.K E S AND FLANA6AN8. last, Well, evening came at friends and with it came all th
1146.ccasion. With came her son Tom, carrying his fiddle-case under his arm, his hair
1147.he top of his head A given very imposing personage was Mr. Fitzgibbon, much to w
1148., Margaret, was the belle of the evening, although attracted. quite all unconsci
1149.Mr. and Mrs. Blake, the latter sparkling cade. with jewels and robed in rich bro
1150.ite a sensation. Mike Sheridan, " moving under finery, as usual. Hush, now not a
1151.PARTY. 163 Conversation had been flowing pretty freely before the appearance of
1152.k up the broken thread. "As I was saying, Mr. O'Callaghan," said he, " it is my
1153. mistress is either the bane or blessing of society, according as inculcates he
1154.e bane or blessing of society, according as inculcates he or she is, good or bad
1155.their children in the I way of acquiring false principles. would as soon think o
1156.inciples. would as soon think of putting my child into a burning house as into a
1157.think of putting my child into a burning house as into a non7 religious school.'
1158. answer. " That is all very fine talking, Mr. O'Callaghan, as you ladies, have o
1159.m for a profession." There was something of this speech, that in a lesser degree
1160.- that make mean ; us unfit enlightening the mind I" ?— have the goodness to a
1161.ith you there. is I myself I am a living proof that your position a false one. w
1162.s you well know, under Catholic training ^ ; I am Irish in heart I — Catholic,
1163.fully prepared to stand by this shedding I love great Republic, the land of the
1164.tion," Irish-Americans were in recording said O'Callaghan, n like you l have gre
1165.r. Mrs. Flanagan here interposed, seeing a cloud gathering on Miles's brow. " I
1166.ere interposed, seeing a cloud gathering on Miles's brow. " I thiuk it's high ti
1167.t's high time you were " ; all get- ting your feet in order for a dance," said s
1168.t are you about, that you're not getting up a set of " Quadrilles do not come fi
1169.o not come first quadrilles or something of the kind ?" on my programme, moI the
1170.\d Scotch reel." it " Never say crossing to where his sister sat. twice," cried
1171. sister sat. twice," cried Tim, starting to his feet, " Up with you, "Mary, and
1172.e all out at — light last. Who's going " I am, to play for us ?" sir, with you
1173. What shall I give you 11 ?" " Something lively, it's Tom/ whispered Ellie at hi
1174. so jou must make them pay their footing." 166 BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. over, and,
1175.LAKES AND FLANAGANS. over, and, stooping down, said something Edward went hi fin
1176.over, and, stooping down, said something Edward went hi fine reel, a low voice t
1177.he sight as much as if they were dancing themselves, and Mike pies, like so Sher
1178.her good, want to see you and her having a share of the — — fun." " Well, we
1179.that your mother that's a is not getting old yet." " Well done, Mrs. Sheridan cr
1180.. Sheridan cried ! dance. Edward, seeing Daniel and his " Now, Mr. O'Callaghan,
1181.tep I can't good example," wife standing up to out, too ?" " Why, I declare, get
1182.over it," said Mr. O'Cal- laghan, rising, and making his bow to Mrs. Reilly. " O
1183.id Mr. O'Cal- laghan, rising, and making his bow to Mrs. Reilly. " Oh, Mr. O'Cal
1184.ree with this cap, or this black dancing. black dress." Mr. O'Callaghan respecte
1185. iso, indeed, sir," said Ellie, standing " I'm not sure whether I can dance a re
1186. not, but I think I can ; so I'm willing to try." reel The Bjreat spirit was thu
1187.e, and was kept up with by " The dancing pairs who simply sought renown, By hold
1188.irs who simply sought renown, By holding out to tire each other down." The fire
1189.further animated throughout by a running of laughing comments and good-humored e
1190.ated throughout by a running of laughing comments and good-humored ejaculations
1191.r." " That's ! the powers you're mending on it 1" 11 Hillo ! Blake, what are you
1192. 11 Hillo ! Blake, what are you thinking of !" ? You'll be left behind if you do
1193.ime to turn. smiled. " What an animating sight !" observed Margaret O'Callaghan,
1194." 168 BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. face. miling Yes, that is a sight which does one's h
1195.ill do !" cried Tim, swingall tired, ing his bulky partner to a seat. " They're
1196." " Oh yes," said Dan, may can't leading his wife to her seat, " you say so now,
1197.e danced that at his aunt Mary's wedding, when Nelly was only a slip of a girl,
1198.I did — — — it was that very thing made did the mustc I almost forgot that
1199.n't a bride Mary! what do you say! bring back anything to you ?" " Yes," said Mr
1200.ry! what do you say! bring back anything to you ?" " Yes," said Mrs. Blake, and
1201. of his face, that he, too, was thinking of a painful contrast. " Now for a set
1202.all satisfied with — my H set, playing, you're quite Well ! I welcome to it."
1203.re then danced, Then came cotilincluding the Lancers*and the Graces. lons, and l
1204.usic, were on the floor at once, jigging away to the enlivening tune of Sir Roge
1205. at once, jigging away to the enlivening tune of Sir Roger " ! ; ''Why de Coverl
1206.Coverley. Yarious songs were sung during the evening, very agreeably the pauses
1207.rious songs were sung during the evening, very agreeably the pauses of the danci
1208.very agreeably the pauses of the dancing. filling up Mr. O'Cal- laghan was an ar
1209.eably the pauses of the dancing. filling up Mr. O'Cal- laghan was an ardent love
1210.n ardent lover of Ireland and everything Irish. Tom Moore was, in his opinion, t
1211.g most of the melodies with much feeling and good voice, taste. She played well,
1212.n, particularly as regarded music Taking her piace at the piano on Edward's Marg
1213.D FLANAGANS. same time : prelude, asking at the " What shall I sing ?" Anything
1214.elude, asking at the " What shall I sing ?" Anything you like !" was the general
1215.g at the " What shall I sing ?" Anything you like !" was the general answer. Aft
1216.nd Margaret's voice was one of thrilling sweetness. When the last faint cadence
1217.. No-*, i^dward," said Margaret, looking timidly u rip, " 1 belies X have a call
1218.s with a song ?" " Oh, certainly to sing. ; but some one must choose what I am M
1219.choose what I am Mother, will you " Sing that new song that you got last week, E
1220.song : " Of what is the old man thinking, At he leans on his oaken staff, From t
1221.taff, From the May-day pastime shrinking, He shares not the merry laagh. But the
1222. yoanjr and gajrAnd his grey head moving slow. Keeps tim« to the air they plfij
1223.PARTY. Ill elder around him are drinking, But not one cup will he quaff Of what
1224.he quaff Of what is the old man thinking, As he leans on hie oaken staff? 1 Ther
1225.dear From the scene before him shrinking,- The dance and the merry laugh, Of the
1226.ugh, Of their calm repose he is thinking, As he leans on his oaken staff." The s
1227. the pretty air and the simple, touching words, not to apeak of the masterly sty
1228.st fancy the good cannot old man leaning on his oaken staff that venerable staff
1229.n !" added Edward a tone of deep feeling, "may he rest in peace!" Amen P repeate
1230.d be better forme now we're all marching where's the use of looking back punishm
1231. all marching where's the use of looking back punishments longer, — straight a
1232.he conversation serious turn, was taking a whether and determined to raise a lau
1233.s intention he sang " The all — ; King of the Cannibal Islands," and by the ti
1234. as soon as she could speak for laughing us outright ? why, you have no pie !" "
1235.and Peter, both of whom Were prosecuting their studies at Mount their St. Mary's
1236.e light-hearted gaiety of such a meeting, and they had, moreover, a painful cons
1237., endeavored to appear as though nothing were amiss, but, in both cases, the vei
1238.u because the Misses Thomson were coming since that, like her as well as she use
1239.ment. Her conversation the whole evening — — 1?4 B LAKES AND FLANAGANS. was
1240.e sat " in silken robe arrayed," looking as though the ancestral dignity of all
1241.of respectable height. Still the evening passed pleasantly away, and no one But,
1242.y lies among flowers," go " the witcning hour of night" was close at hand before
1243.r. and Mrs. Blake) dreamed cf it's being so it late. There was a general ex- cla
1244.at ed they must 41 was time to be moving, but Tim it," declar- all have deoch-a-
1245.AMILY PARTY 116 reach to you the helping han', Good night and joy be wi' ye a',"
1246. wi' ye a'," there was a general shaking of hands, as the Irish heart. warm and
1247.was the characteristic close of Cloaking and shawling were quick ^ 7 dispatched,
1248.cteristic close of Cloaking and shawling were quick ^ 7 dispatched, and the gues
1249.discoursed pretty freely on the tippling habits of the Irish. Now *\ot I have gr
1250.ow *\ot I have great pleasure in stating that there was the slightest foundation
1251.ked up from the book he had been reading, and said, with a sneer " Shall I help
1252.ir? reply. " What's hinder me from going up myself ?" "Oh! you sir, nothing in t
1253.going up myself ?" "Oh! you sir, nothing in the world, father after dancing so 1
1254.thing in the world, father after dancing so 1" —only I I thought felt tired mu
1255.arm, his I do assure you But his mocking tone belied words. " Yes, you did mean
1256. BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. 176 his sneering smile, commanded " —what then stairs,
1257.You ought to be Blake, her heart sinking within her. it's Come up Henry Miles
1258.nry Miles — in bed, instead of sitting poring over them books. I suppose Eliza
1259.es — in bed, instead of sitting poring over them books. I suppose Eliza's in i
1260.go." Eliza was not bed ; she was reading in her own room. At first Miles resiste
1261.m, and followed her up stairs, muttering as he weal " another time will do as we
1262.s gnesta quitted his hospitable dwelling, and as we have seen Mr. and Mrs. Blake
1263.ould have great pleasure in accompanying Mrs. Reilly and her son, or Mr. O'Cal;
1264. have no small regard. They were walking home very quietly, Daniel and his wife
1265.and his wife before, and .Mike following close behind with his young sister. The
1266.rdant sounds of drunken revelry, issuing from an open door, proclaimed the gin-s
1267.er's fellows, evidently the felicitating themselves fine, came two or three rowd
1268.es fine, came two or three rowdy-looking worse for liquor. They were just an hav
1269.rse for liquor. They were just an having outwitted the landlord, and one of them
1270.e landlord, and one of them, a strapping young fellow, in a round slop-jacket, a
1271. the first speaker, un- luckily catching a glimpse of Annie Sheridan's fair face
1272.still close said the mother, a thrilling whisper, and not daring to turn her hea
1273.her, a thrilling whisper, and not daring to turn her head. " There's two of them
1274. f AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE TURNS UP Cc>raing 179 up close to poor Annie, whose littl
1275.gan's highly valued oak stick, observing, half in jest and half in earnest, tbat
1276.ched lovingly in his right hand, keeping his eye Bteadil; fixed on the other, in
1277.g arm?" at the same time I say, catching the terrified girl by the shoulder. Han
1278.re to lay a finger on her 11 and drawing in his sister from the ruffian's grasp,
1279. I'm as little afraid of now, swaggering bully that you are, as I was nine years
1280.he gutter. I don't want to hare anything to do with you, if you'll ouly let us p
1281.t of his stick, which came with stunning effect on Dillon's crown, smashing thro
1282.nning effect on Dillon's crown, smashing through his white bullied rowdy-hat, an
1283.and to with the ruffiau Jim, who, seeing his comrade prostrate and motionless, b
1284.affair rather too serious for nis liking : it was just as much as he could do to
1285.d what to do, Mike's stick came whirling through the air and down on his right a
1286.t his father did not answer of Bill, ing this, he had run off in pursuit who had
1287.n and Annie. Mike hastened away, leaving one of the in Seevan- quished to look a
1288.ame up time to see his father dismissing the valiant Bill with a kick on his pos
1289.ll with a kick on his posterior, telling him to take that by way of a keepsake.
1290.ter had just got into the house, Bitting where Nancy, the maid-servant, had been
1291.y, the maid-servant, had been up waiting for them. mind wakening the men, Jenny
1292. been up waiting for them. mind wakening the men, Jenny !" said her husband from
1293.? Didn't I give Bill what de was working for ?" " Never " You did, indeed, fathe
1294.id, indeed, father P said Mike, laughing hear* AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE TURNS UP. lil
1295.pe you're not hurt anywhere ?" " Nothing worth speaking of, father I think I spr
1296.urt anywhere ?" " Nothing worth speaking of, father I think I sprained my wrist
1297.ather I think I sprained my wrist making that blow at your friend Jim but it —
1298.oused, she speedily went about preparing a linament and a bandage, and Mike's ar
1299.rm was very soon bound up and II resting in a sling. 1" I wish you joy of your a
1300. soon bound up and II resting in a sling. 1" I wish you joy of your admirer, Ann
1301.night, my poor fellow after you fighting for ua all so bravely. There's my hand,
1302.as only stunned, for I saw him beginning father." to move as I ran off to help y
1303.tly, " he got You needn't bother nothing but what he deserved. " Even if joursdf
1304. God, it's no wcrse with us than Leaving Mike to woo " tired Nature's sweet rest
1305.ine luckless acquaintance, Hugh. dashing girls, one nineteen, and the other a ye
1306.illiterate, was himself wholly and being rise, all his painfully conscious of hi
1307.ildren a good education any cost. Having once made up his mind on the inferiorit
1308., or, as John was wont to say, " praying schools," nothing could induce him to g
1309.wont to say, " praying schools," nothing could induce him to give the latter a t
1310.ney he tould find in the house, boasting to his companions bow 184 B LAKES AND F
1311.it is but with little hope of succeeding it still he went, ; because he thought
1312. with a heavy sigh he the house, pitying the unfortunate parents of such a son,
1313.tunate parents of such a son, and saying in his heart : own " pray heaven he may
1314.ere his evenings and, sometimes, cunning old fox ; nights were spent, from the a
1315.nd was likely to be still absent, hoping " against hope," that he might yet be A
1316.e had no taste for such hard work. ering business to those He left the butchhis
1317. tried hand for a while at stage-driving. This, too, was soon given up, for the
1318.ound money to spend not he kept lounging around the taverns, and, in due time, b
1319.and most human beings. (Always excepting election when no man is worthless in th
1320.e haunts, worthless of days, — — ing good liquor. Such had been the him at M
1321.ugh Dillon since we saw school, sneering at It and papist propensities. Harry Bl
1322. appearance, for he was really a looking young fellow, notwithstanding tages of
1323. a looking young fellow, notwithstanding tages of his condition. their early imp
1324. grief and remorse were alike unavailing neither could bring back the past, nor
1325.ere alike unavailing neither could bring back the past, nor arrest the headlong
1326.f subjection to their parents, depending, of course, on certain conditions, such
1327.on certain conditions, such as the being allowed to "dress as fine" as they wish
1328.lic balls, to subscribe to a circulating library, to- gether with various other
1329.ditions all (in other words, they having their said to be " not so own way), the
1330.e they had." When pended bad considering the sort of a brother Poor brother and
1331.ow, he found himself with his head lying against a lamp-post, and his first sens
1332.ow did I get here ?" Now, it was nothing new fot — iN OLD ACQUAINTANCE TURNS U
1333. Sheridan, Nerved stick in hand, raising his arm to deal the blow. be wanted to
1334. to see whether Mike was within striking tance. was sileut around neither Mike S
1335.ed himself over and over again, thinking of his trusty comrades. number one !" H
1336.ty comrades. number one !" He was making the best of his way back to Boner's, wh
1337.'s, when Jim darted out of a neighboring alley, accosting " Hillo, Dillon is tha
1338.ed out of a neighboring alley, accosting " Hillo, Dillon is that you ? him with
1339.hought you : ! " I guess they're minding were a dead man !" " If I'm not, I need
1340.as all along your quarrel. 1 had nothing to do with it. See there !" and he poin
1341.illon, coolly. " Where's that blubbering feller, Bill ? Hillo here he comes I gu
1342.ted I" Sure enough, Bill came up rubbing and benrjoaning the ?ery part by Dillon
1343.gh, Bill came up rubbing and benrjoaning the ?ery part by Dillon, whereupon the
1344.AGANS. ; btm,t into a loud laugh, saying didn't I " I told you so, Jhn«- ?— w
1345.lon found it expedient to lay a sticking-plaster on their mental wounds. — Com
1346. him ! That leg of his must be something harder than flesh ; I'm bound to say, I
1347.ast, for Jim was in no humor of laughing. His friend Boner sent for a doctor to
1348.THE UNDUTIFDL SON It 189 was the morning table. after the merry meeting at Tim F
1349.e morning table. after the merry meeting at Tim Flanagan's. breakfast Miles Blak
1350.f their feet. Did you ever hear anything like the impudence that Henry gave me l
1351.Henry gave me last night ?" Eliza coming in at the moment prevented her mother f
1352. moment prevented her mother from making any reply. " What in the name of good"
1353. to have their father and mother waiting for them at the breakfast table Is your
1354.e breakfast table Is your brother coming down, or what is he — ! about ?" " Wh
1355. I thought you knew that h? wasn't going to I" breakfast here knew no such thing
1356. to I" breakfast here knew no such thing. Where else would he breakfast? Hush he
1357.nies !" But Henry T. Blake was not going there he had no "^so, indeed, I I ; int
1358."^so, indeed, I I ; intention of joining the little family-circle on that par- t
1359.mily-circle on that par- ticular morning. Passing on through the left, hall, and
1360.le on that par- ticular morning. Passing on through the left, hall, and turn- in
1361.on through the left, hall, and turn- ing neither to the right hand nor the he de
1362.y father tnought proper to favor evening with an intimation that my ways were no
1363.t my ways were not alt<* gether pleasing to him, at the same time threatening to
1364.ing to him, at the same time threatening to torn mm : My Dear Mother — me last
1365.ND FLANAGANS. oat of doors, or something to that effect, I hereby beg to apprta
1366.im or any one else do it for me. Wishing you both a good appetite for your break
1367. cannot partake of it without forfeiting I my own self-respect, remain, my dear
1368. as a it practical joke, notwithstanding Eliza's assurance that ; was no such th
1369.iza's assurance that ; was no such thing but, on inquiring of the servants, it w
1370.at ; was no such thing but, on inquiring of the servants, it was found that Henr
1371.leful news for very early in the morning. Mrs. Blake fell back, pale as the fath
1372. heard both parents indulge when talking of their children's future, and now she
1373.a pang of sorrow, perhaps remorse. Going round the table to where her mother com
1374.enry be back soon. he will soon boarding out, and you shall see him coming home
1375.arding out, and you shall see him coming home a trot penitent some of these days
1376.ears. It seemed to her then that nothing could ever again induce her to be asham
1377.ith good resolutions." Sin! gular paving-stones for such a place In of the cours
1378.by appoiutment, the transaction entering on the some important in business. '•
1379.hat I have changed quarters this morning. The old man spoke to me in such a way
1380.ke to me in such a way it ; last evening that I could tell no longer put up with
1381. events, changes are pleasaut 1 boarding-house." " But what of Eliza ?" " Oh ! E
1382., Pearson eh, — * Nonsense ! ! And ing, I'll introduce you. I proposed you at
1383. you. I proposed you at the this evening. last meet- and you are to be admitted
1384.e, Zachary *' !" cried ; Blake, laughing is ; I object to one of your terms is M
1385.urs. shook the dust my feet this morning, and stand before " you a " free man."
1386. will leave no means untried. If joining your honorable order to may serve as a
1387. may serve as a step, I am right willing do 11 it. At what hour do you assemble
1388.den "Apropos to what we were just saying did you heaff eight o'clock, punctual t
1389.ONS. "No, what was I it ? 198 —nothing bad for I ; hope, for I confess he's a
1390.r I confess he's a have a sort of liking " Oh, of course !" Mike good-hearted "
1391.llow as ever lived." said Henry laughing ; good nature which he is, I believe, a
1392. hear." to relate the occurrence, ending with : Henry proceeded I cannot tell ho
1393.T* wan Zachary's question, half laughing, and half serious 94 B LAKES AND FLANAG
1394. to lean on > — how / felt after being admitted." " Well, I can't say I feel s
1395.r I may do yet," replied Henry, laughing ; hereafter. I feel, however, that I ha
1396.ather Come in new and have swne joii ing upper. be rejoiced to h1397.t Father has been a Freemason, now going on, five-and-twenty years. It me see, w
1398.asure, to his own success in busi- being a Freemason, and beneficial to he was q
1399.d Blake, " there the advantage of having an enlightened, educated man envy you."
1400.ust then the door was opened, and seeing them safely housed, we leave them for t
1401. Very father soon after Henry's becoming a Freemason, hit visit was surprised on
1402.son, hit visit was surprised one evening by a fair friend, from Mr. Pearson, the
1403.? know was here awhile yesterday evening anythiug of " it of, though he Mary, di
1404.Blake has been for some time past paying attention to my daughter, as you are pr
1405." Yes, I thought he had a sort of liking for her," said Miles coolly. " Precisel
1406.me to arrange their thoughts in speaking order. answer but for are, on the contr
1407.ect. If be the fashionable way of making matches, first it is very different fro
1408.heir parents and never dreamed of taking any important step without asking their
1409.taking any important step without asking their advice." " Precisely, Mr. Blake t
1410.ependence the glory not think of finding fault with is your son for asserting th
1411.ing fault with is your son for asserting the dignity of manhood, since he come t
1412.consent ?" What need is there for asking my consent, when Henry Blake is his own
1413.sk our consent, or else not to be making fools of us by sending you, or any one
1414. not to be making fools of us by sending you, or any one If he else." II Mr. Pea
1415.- " It Mr. Pearson — and another thing, I can it. ther into the millstone than
1416.s the I tell it reply, "for its a saying we have in it the old country. either,
1417.ke it very coolly ?" said Miles, turning to to get " They want some of our hard
1418.get " They want some of our hard earning, all or they wouldn't trouble us at pik
1419.ow to tell us." "I don't care a farthing whether he does or not," re; torted Mil
1420.y short with, " There's no usein talking, stand as well as any one mother and my
1421.I supEliza —your pose, you'll be doing the same, as soon as chance." Eliza blu
1422.at he had said. hand on her head, saying, (when he was in very good humor ha you
1423.uffle my temper but, then, Harry's Going over to Eliza, he laid his ! " Don't cr
1424.AGE for 199 told you I was sorry nothing, pa what I said — what more would you
1425.more would you have f" " Oh ! —nothing more, I assure you, but my me feelings
1426.id his wife, soothingly '* an old saying and a true one, it that sorrow is time
1427.to search for a book he had been reading. that book that Edward Flanagan lent "D
1428.heavily. self, as she resumed her sewing for reading, only " ; it's little heart
1429.f, as she resumed her sewing for reading, only " ; it's little heart you have ca
1430.S. the paternal mansion on the following evening. Eliza contrived to give him an
1431.aternal mansion on the following evening. Eliza contrived to give him an admonit
1432.she met him at the parlor door, glancing at the : same time towards their father
1433.f tb« , head. Miles's surmise regarding the money was perfectly cor Henry make
1434.e most delicate manner possible, telling the enamored aspirant all for his : " L
1435.t depend upon it, Henry, there's nothing like is money, especially when a young
1436.men. about to enter the Money is wanting at the outset, and money must be had, i
1437.to Jane what she has hitherto had making a respectable appearance in society. Go
1438. will soften his — — heart !" Acting ©n his parents this politic advice, He
1439.passed between him and Eliza, indicating a joint course it of observation in fee
1440.oint course it of observation in feeling it the parental pulse, as actually were
1441. not till Miles had come to the laughing point, and his wife's face A MARRIAGE.
1442.re his intentions." " I've been thinking of getting married, father," said ke, a
1443.ntions." " I've been thinking of getting married, father," said ke, and then he
1444.hy didn't us know now ! ?" I was waiting to have the matter definitively settled
1445.f you to save us the trouble of thinking because ; Oh or speaking on a subject o
1446.ble of thinking because ; Oh or speaking on a subject of such importance ! You a
1447.ce ! You acted like a dutiful and loving son, and we'll not forget your good con
1448.ed Mrs. Blake, with a ; doubtful meaning so " I began to think that all, Henry w
1449.ple like you and me Miles, have anything do with choosing a wife like for such a
1450.me Miles, have anything do with choosing a wife like for such a son as ours The
1451.it his lip till was evidently struggling ally it was well-nigh evil colorless. H
1452. and eventuwith the succeeded in putting down the spirit, hope of being soon abl
1453.n putting down the spirit, hope of being soon able to " pay as he said to bimsel
1454.ck. the matter to a satisfactory footing. hardly an obstacle to be surmounted, t
1455.y an obstacle to be surmounted, trifling we except the one of religion ; and tha
1456. tactics. in the forenoon, on a shopping excursion. move was It the finishing-st
1457.ing excursion. move was It the finishing-stroke of real touch of the Henry's cle
1458.l the well-managed policy of the evening. It is needless to say that his mother
1459.at he gloves on the table in the sitting-room, and called to Eliza to bring them
1460.tting-room, and called to Eliza to bring them. This Eliza could not do, but she
1461.herself, but he certainly said something, amounting half a dozen words. assent,
1462.t he certainly said something, amounting half a dozen words. assent, in all to W
1463.za and then hastened back to the sitting-room. on what they were to muslin," sai
1464.c it ii •o ?ery prettj and so becoming to you, and wear my A 1IARRIAGS. it's 2
1465.za .spoke — the brown h the very thing." quite lip, seriously but in there was
1466.riously but in there was a smile curling her pretty and a twinkle in all her sof
1467.he — poor simple woman, ; — speaking How good faith herself in she never dre
1468.self in she never dreamed of any lurking satire her daughter's words. Unfortunat
1469.r. So she contented herself with rubbing some camphor on the cheek without ditto
1470.ouble was the necessity of disappointing " poor Jane." She tried to persuade her
1471.er mother would not hear of such a thing. ° Well, what will you say, ma, if Jan
1472.ave her. sion, That settled the shopping excur- and I am happy to say that Eliza
1473.he wm not of long duration. When evening came it was almost 904 B LAKES AND FLAN
1474.AND FLANAGANS. was able to play and sing sonu to think that quite gone, so that
1475.t was " true enough that Henry was going to be married to Miss Pearson." " Aud w
1476.e match ; is, in every respect, pleasing to Miles and me for the only objection
1477.d have was about that Jane cares nothing at religion, and my son tells us all ab
1478. She'd as soon be a Catholic as anything else." " So much the worse," observed D
1479.pe of a person who rarely, cares nothing about religion. Such persons are or if
1480.to ; have a certain fixed idea of saving his or her soul and, If once convinced
1481. hopes let of his intended wife becoming a Catholic him take care that he himsel
1482.estant if — or, not that, 11 something worse." us. Lord save life Father one.
1483.ust tell Henry what you're after telling me." w I should be very willing to do s
1484. telling me." w I should be very willing to do so, my dear Mrs. Blake, but I hav
1485.nities, one way and another, of sounding yo^r sou's disposition, that 1 nave not
1486.t 1 nave not the smallest hope of making any impression on his mind. Could not y
1487.o I have only to wish you a good morning. When sorrow comes, as come it will, yo
1488.me. Tf I could do you any good by coming to see you, I would come often ; but, u
1489.t, unfortunately, I cannot. Good morning." He say. was gone before Mrs. Blake co
1490.ecause he wasn't consulted. it ; telling Henry anything about for, couldn't go b
1491.t consulted. it ; telling Henry anything about for, couldn't go back of his Mrs.
1492.spoken ; munion-table in her own meeting-house. They next pro- ceeded to the res
1493.ot " made in Heaven," and bis far-seeing eye could already detect the dark cloud
1494.ark clouds of sin and sorrow gather* ing over the devoted heads of those whom he
1495. of those whom he was made the unwilling instrument in bringing together. So pre
1496.ade the unwilling instrument in bringing together. So pretty Jane Pearson became
1497. happy pair set out for Saratoga, taking Eliza with them The whole party, includ
1498.iza with them The whole party, including Miles Blake and his wife, had breakfast
1499." were invited. In fact, the whole thing was kept quite a secret as far as Henry
1500.s to Not what wai A MARRIAGE. 20"} going on, but, of course, their knowledge cam
1501.exofficial announcement. ; cept a flying visit from Mrs. Blake a few days before
1502.d that the secret was no secret, wedding. although none of them would " I suppos
1503.l how they heard it. ; was them tattling girls that " can't turn in our skin for
1504.n. If God spares us we'll have a wedding of our own before long, if it was only
1505.her quiet smile, " the man's only making fun of you." " Well, but I did hear som
1506.f you." " Well, but I did hear something about that Margaret O'Callaghan," obser
1507.rs. Blake, " and I've met Edward walking with her sometimes. She's a nice-look-
1508.th her sometimes. She's a nice-look- ing girl, and I suppose she'll have a littl
1509. get. They say the old man has something by him 1" " Something by him 1" repeate
1510. man has something by him 1" " Something by him 1" repeated Tim, drily " I rathe
1511. hope Edward will get somecomes tc thing handsome with the girl, if it a match,
1512.t say that But mind Edward was his going to be married, or that Miss O'Callaghan
1513. told you that we'd try to get a wedding How do you know but for : it is Susan t
1514.t have him," cried Susan, with a pouting " he didn't bring like him. me that can
1515. Susan, with a pouting " he didn't bring like him. me that candy he promised me,
1516.suddenly remembered that she was staying too long. When she vvas gone, Mrs. Flan
1517." said she, " and there's no use setting rumors afloat k till we're sure the thi
1518.umors afloat k till we're sure the thing will take place." ; know it will take p
1519.ery well that O'Callaghan wants to bring it about, and that Margaret likes Edwar
1520.r. Power, as you mean to do this evening. Then let us all make up our minds that
1521. to be a match, but I wouldn't be making a blowing-horn of it till you see your
1522.atch, but I wouldn't be making a blowing-horn of it till you see your way straig
1523.e your way straight before you." Evening being come, and supper over, Tim got up
1524. way straight before you." Evening being come, and supper over, Tim got up and t
1525.saw, or thought he saw, a tear " I Going back quickly to where she stood, he too
1526.and and squeezed it hard, hard. thinking, mother dear, but never you your heart.
1527.n you'r« fear, with God's help, nothing by this change I shall my condition les
1528.at the thoughts of even partially losing the companionship of a dear and most du
1529.son said, After a moment's delay, during called out from the ; which he, too, ha
1530.the ; which he, too, had been swallowing down certain choking sensations which h
1531.had been swallowing down certain choking sensations which hall-door, came upon h
1532.upon him, he it's where he stood holding the handle trying ? " I'm blest ; and h
1533.where he stood holding the handle trying ? " I'm blest ; and happy, Edward, but
1534.e you are what on earth plain is keeping you why, you're as dilatory as this on
1535.ou're as dilatory as this on the wedding-day, ! Margaret will be apt to com- Out
1536.you." Edward came both left out laughing good humoredly, and they the house toge
1537. 210 BLAKK3 AND FLANAGANS. woman coming out, crying as Power's door, they saw a
1538. AND FLANAGANS. woman coming out, crying as Power's door, they saw a She was thi
1539. better days. The light of a neighboring lamp fell full oc her wasted features,
1540. to the speaker's face, and, recognizing him at once, she held out her hand. " O
1541.. Sure that in poor man of mine is lying for death, and I was rites asking Dr. P
1542. lying for death, and I was rites asking Dr. Power to come and give " For death
1543.nagan, and oh oh but it's the hard thing for me to have tc tell it. He Baid he w
1544.is two- that Father Power's after giving me — the now and for evermore." Edwar
1545.od " Well, go home now, my as if waiting for an answer. Lord's blessing be about
1546.f waiting for an answer. Lord's blessing be about him poor dear woman, and keep
1547.e, and she'll be with you in the morning, she's a living And if the worst does h
1548. with you in the morning, she's a living And if the worst does happen, Mrs. Dill
1549.rst does happen, Mrs. Dillon," trembling with emotion, " you'll find plenty of h
1550. a friend, or the want of God's blessing she added, in a hoarse sepulchral voice
1551.Power's parlor, they found him preparing for his sick-call. He was just taking u
1552.ng for his sick-call. He was just taking up his ritual to set out, but on seeing
1553. up his ritual to set out, but on seeing the Flanagans, he laid down his book, a
1554. good to God," replied Tim had something particular to say to your reverence, bu
1555.dismiss his hands. expended when nothing was being added to it, and so the poor
1556.s hands. expended when nothing was being added to it, and so the poor old couple
1557.an is much troubled about " I not having the means of burying her husband decent
1558.bout " I not having the means of burying her husband decently." " Well, tell her
1559.m me, your reverence," said Tim, dashing away a tear which he could not repress
1560.decent burial ; "It is just — speaking for the opportunity." first time " ; we
1561.be no joke. reverence has got an inkling of 11 I see your it already." I have he
1562.need not delay your arrangements waiting for my you have it, and may God bless y
1563.y worthy friends. I must hasten to bring the consolations of our holy gion to th
1564.sion Tim Flanagan and own quiet dwelling. his son retraced their Tiit was not lo
1565. for b> her old-fashioned Irish breeding. a fH« DILLONS — AN IRISH FUNERAL. 9
1566.rly for AMONGST THE DILLONS Next morning Mrs. Flanagan the desolate home of the
1567.ings of the youngest daughter, amounting, on an average, to three dollars a week
1568.and occasionally came out with something very to her brother like an anathema, i
1569.ke the Ola people comfortable, grumbling more or less at times. Her days were sp
1570.ays were spent from seven in the morning till six in the evening, in the work-ro
1571.n in the morning till six in the evening, in the work-room of a tailoring establ
1572.evening, in the work-room of a tailoring establish' — 216 BLAKE S AND FLANAGAN
1573.ll at was so dreadful it home —nothing but groaning and crying, and takall ing
1574.dreadful it home —nothing but groaning and crying, and takall ing medicine, an
1575. home —nothing but groaning and crying, and takall ing medicine, and that," so
1576. but groaning and crying, and takall ing medicine, and that," so poor Hannah fou
1577.her. When Mrs. Flanagan arrived, panting under the load of a heavy basket, she f
1578.in, wasted hand, instinctively clutching at the faded coverlit, a relic of wife
1579.ed coverlit, a relic of wife was sitting beside the bed, her hands clasped on he
1580.ity. His emaciated face of her suffering husband. 11 Bless my soul, Mrs Dillon !
1581.erself. How in is poor John this morning "Very night of it. middling, Mrs. Flana
1582.this morning "Very night of it. middling, Mrs. Flanagan; he put it's a poor I'm
1583.ears choked her " Now, don't be fretting or repining, Mrs. Dillon j t?try one ha
1584.her " Now, don't be fretting or repining, Mrs. Dillon j t?try one has their turn
1585. from the world." She had been unpacking the basket while she spoke, and had its
1586.she squeezed could not speak, but taking the hand of her kind friend, it between
1587.ssion that could hardly keep from crying with her. never do, as she said to hers
1588. get chicken-soup ?~- you're only joking, Betsy." " Indeed and I'm not joking, J
1589.ing, Betsy." " Indeed and I'm not joking, John. it If I hadn't the it. soup to g
1590.pected it's Here's Mrs. Flanagan waiting to see you, her you may thank for the c
1591. I am, John," said Mrs. Flanagan, coming forward to the bed-side, and hastily wi
1592.ward to the bed-side, and hastily wiping away the tears see her ?" — which she
1593. God : me for that hour he said, raising hia eyes to heaven. Then a sudden thoug
1594. to strike " Betsy, did you see anything of Hugh since ?" him 11 when ?" inquire
1595.twa seemed to revive him, then motioning away the cup with his hand, he lay for
1596. few moments silent, women stood looking alternately at him and each other. if S
1597.him and each other. if Suddenly starting, as turned to his wife : an adder had s
1598.tle 1" said his wife, " don't be wearing away strength you have, fretting about
1599.wearing away strength you have, fretting about that unfor 1 tunate boy time." Go
1600.unfor 1 tunate boy time." God will bring him round in his ow^ " The sick man tur
1601. her almost ! fiercely. ! will not bring him round I tell you no — no He no !
1602.t it mad ; it's all true that I'm saying. of uj are in fault, Betsy, and we're b
1603.n fault, Betsy, and we're both suffering for now. here- God after, grant that we
1604.ber the old ! use of talkidg that saying, what canH be cured must be endured ? w
1605.na- gan to ; I can't easy without seeing him. if And that poor Celia. Oh I could
1606.d passed, marked only by the low moaning of the sick man, and his occasional gla
1607.ppearance. BLAEES AND FLANAGANS. Hearing her light step on the stairs, hei his h
1608.d, even paler and more miserable-looking than when alone. «he left. She was Mrs
1609. man. He had his eye fixed though trying to read her thoughts. " Well ?" said he
1610.e me had you any money in him him coming. " That's I've — God ! — — he ask
1611. ready to burst. She arose, and pressing Mrs. Dillon's hand, told her she would
1612.told her she would return in the evening with Tim. "And be sure to make !" poor
1613.she could not articulate a word. Bending over the sick man, Mrs. Flanagan said J
1614.u again. be back with Tim in the evening." " God spare was the fervent reply you
1615.n the and that death was not far evening, when Tim Flanagan and his wife entered
1616.n and his wife entered the poor dwelling of the Dillons, they found death before
1617.ready decently "laid out" by the pitying kindness of " the neighbor women." bere
1618. knees, in The a corner near the resting on her bowed down, and her hands the pi
1619.y, even tastefully dressed, and carrying on what seemed to be an interesting con
1620.ying on what seemed to be an interesting conversation with a certain Watty Sulli
1621. and heard u after all, it's the morning : so much the better — what had he to
1622.od had dealt mercifully poor John taking him from a world where he had nothing t
1623.ng him from a world where he had nothing to expect hours at the wake, but misery
1624. at the wake, but misery. After spending a few Tim and Nelly returned home, the
1625.elly returned home, the former observing that he had to be up early next nrornin
1626.that he had to be up early next nrorning, "for," said he, "I want to make prepar
1627.t and went with them to the door, saying, as they parted, " 1 leave all to you,
1628.ough Well said, Hannah — no use trying to hide !" whispered ! Watty ; " I like
1629.might speak like that. see a girl having let bad I wouldn't her if I were you !"
1630.d for one more to her Sheridan. " liking, asking Watty if he knew Mike What ! Hu
1631.e more to her Sheridan. " liking, asking Watty if he knew Mike What ! Hugh's sam
1632.d man, and promised to come back evening with his father and lome of their frien
1633. replied air, though he were endeavoring to account for such singular infatuatio
1634.lks ; " They're a rum these church-going there's uo knowing what they're Ihej do
1635.um these church-going there's uo knowing what they're Ihej don't ever do things
1636.hings like other people." " Next morning Tim Flanagan and Dan Sheridan went They
1637. said wish we may be able to do anything after his great coat in all," Dan, as h
1638.buttoned up ; prepara- tion for starting " the people haven't ; much pity for Di
1639.behind him, and sure enough me him dying such wretched poverty, a man still that
1640.rs won't have as for much trial. feeling him as you and I have." " Well, well, h
1641. expect." May the bless your undertaking !" said Mrs. Flanagan, as she closed th
1642.ft the dinner arranged ready for cooking, she put on her bonnet and shawl, and w
1643.se, just to see how It things were going on there. wa? a full hour after Tim's*
1644.we didn't spend our forenoon fo? nothing. dred. Dan and myself are going to make
1645. nothing. dred. Dan and myself are going to make up the huna nice penny for ooor
1646.. Dillon, that," will leave after paying all expenses." " God be praised for " t
1647.u what, Tim, I'm in more humor of eating now than I was at breakfast-time." " Po
1648., were diffi- Hold your plate for a wing Edward and John home Edward was in to d
1649.se like ? good bishop never did anything It but get up that college, at of grati
1650. the door a crowd was collected, waiting for the appointed time. Within the hous
1651.house all was silent, the second morning after On except the smothered groans of
1652.dow, and the rather ostentatious wailing of the daughter. The people on such his
1653.n such his pros- without were discussing pretty occasions, the merits freely, as
1654. tone of the con- versation was anything but complimentary to the absent represe
1655.hered accents : " There he is he was ing in, — Ilugh a cigar — look ! look !
1656. there, indeed, Dillon himself, standing at the door lookin his mouth, and his w
1657.onless for some minutes, perhaps turning th« B I. AKES AND FLANAGANS own mind.
1658.r in in his expectation, almost dreading some violent outbreak of little remorse
1659.ttle remorseful grief, but no such thing. the affectionate son turned away quite
1660.n turned away quite composedly, say- ing : " I guess the old man is gone at last
1661.cornful smile on the speaker's a cutting sarcasm stood. in his and words, which
1662.ron him, he shoved back his hat, Turning fiercely and regarded him a moment with
1663.n, and I have you since our last meeting !" He clenched his fist, and flung away
1664.le a reply, ! quarrel." Dillon was going to make an angry : when a low here's th
1665.ad been some time corpse !" A. " waiting. his hard, coffin shudder ran through D
1666.hearse. " I say, Mike," said he, holding out his hand, which Mike was did not re
1667.al ! kind of you. ?" Where are you going to bury the old man " In the Catholic b
1668.ry the old man " In the Catholic burying-ground, in Eleventh street for me," cri
1669.go with him to that there Popish burying-ground." * " Fd " Nobody asked you to g
1670. any one else where you're after 6ending us ness, ; Hugh We can bury your father
1671.ter his ear Such side, were the pleasing sounds which met on every made his retr
1672.h met on every made his retreat, looking defiance at every succes- sive speaker.
1673.ortuIt was, nate mother and sister being placed in a hackney-coach immediately a
1674. The one, cannot but respect the feeling which gives It is rise tice, to such de
1675.some suit of mourniug very deep mourning, indeed, as became Hannah's grief. Poor
1676.— Dillon had a nervous fear of getting through her funds, little so the only t
1677.ough her funds, little so the only thing she bought, for herself in was a black
1678., she had no sooner secured her mourning than she began to come out again, and,
1679.sable habiliments, delighted in show ing off with Watty, and made it her chief p
1680.one afternoon, her eyes red with weeping. " Why, what's the matter with you, Mrs
1681. in Mrs. Flanagan, her ?" kind, soothing waj I hope there's nothing wrong Not mu
1682.ind, soothing waj I hope there's nothing wrong Not much, Mrs. Flanagan, not much
1683.poor woman, with an attempt at regaining her composure. " Nothing ought to griev
1684.pt at regaining her composure. " Nothing ought to grieve me now, after what I ha
1685., Mrs. Flanagan ; but it seems was going down Leonard Btreet with a bundle of cl
1686.th a bundle of clothes that 1 was taking home to Mrs. Lambton (you know I wash f
1687.ould I see but my daughter Celia walking with a young man. She was so gaily dres
1688.gainst the door, a lady that was passing roused to, me up, and when I began to c
1689.hen I began to come I burst out a crying, and I think that done me good, for I g
1690. you my good to me, after all, in giving me such kiud friends as you and Mrs. Sh
1691. all trouble. God is she felt on hearing this sorrowful story. She applied by re
1692.orrowful story. She applied by reminding herself rather to console the poor moth
1693. a suitor Edward Flanagan was everything that she could wish their tastes, their
1694.gether under the same religious training they had learned the catechism in the s
1695.hair. But better than soul, warm, loving heart, and her pure was her the living
1696.g heart, and her pure was her the living abode all of faith, hope, and charity.
1697.rs. Flanagan that the prospect of having her itself, a mother was, in no small i
1698.d. As the time appointed for the wedding drew near, all was bustle and joyous ex
1699.ween the two houses the whole were going to day long, except when Margaret came
1700.xcept when Margaret came with her sewing to ration, but such was not the case. 2
1701.lanagan, benefit of her advice in cating. have the fabrifire whatever his articl
1702.off bodilv, and if the paternal dwelling. of brass ?" Do you suppose our faces a
1703.nd say " You say so, sir !" or something of the kind, and then Mrs. Flanagan wou
1704.another opportunity offered for cracking a at Margaret's expense. At it length t
1705.ith full the bright sun- shine streaming air down on and the gladdened earth, an
1706.ceived the Holy Communion on the morning A of their marriage. MARRIAGE 235 So, t
1707.y worthy : friends," said he, addressing the respective parents " I think I have
1708.and, in so them to adorn and edify doing, you have laid up a store of fitted hap
1709. fitted happiness for your own declining years. In their virtue and you have the
1710.ears, in the enjoyment of every blessing ! I will now you good-morning, as I hav
1711.y blessing ! I will now you good-morning, as I have to make before any one comes
1712.rs. Reilly was in her glory that morning, and she declared over and over airain,
1713.ur own eh, Sally ?" it was Tom's wedding-day. — " Now, don't be bothering me,
1714.dding-day. — " Now, don't be bothering me, it Tim — don't put me this." in a
1715. put me this." in a passion this morning, for of wouldn't be lucky to get out te
1716.miled her into the Reilly, first nothing, as Edward lifted carriage. With her we
1717. breakfasted merry time they had of ding-party amongst joyous. it. Tim Flanagan'
1718.y were very sorry, &c, reading of this note was most unceremoniously i
1719.e rupted by Tim, with Let not for coming, and that's all we want to know. them k
1720.r my part, I'm not sorry they're staying away, for, to tell the truth, they'd on
1721.After breakfast, young people, including Mike THE MARRIAGE PARTY. 231 Sheridan,
1722.e numerous guests invited to the wedding. in Miles Blake came back early wife th
1723.s Blake came back early wife the evening with his and daughter, the latter bent
1724.daughter, the latter bent on astonishing her Irish friends. at the good style in
1725.Irish supper would go off in the evening. An wedding it was something new, and E
1726. would go off in the evening. An wedding it was something new, and Eliza had an
1727.the evening. An wedding it was something new, and Eliza had an idea that be quit
1728.t still she would try it for one evening, even at the risk of being bored to dea
1729.r one evening, even at the risk of being bored to death. It would be a Eliza ric
1730.e ball with her presence. Tim by gracing When laghaii's the Blakes arrived, they
1731.ance, to back him in a bet he was making. Reilly, his Tim Flanagan, and "Let me
1732.said Miles; "you ? me buy a pig offering a poke, would you bet —what here a yo
1733.aid who lay back in " arm-chair enjoying the fun at his leisure. Don't you know
1734.g Walsh." Eliza was horri- the foregoing lines), which he did on condition that
1735.ith the vulgar name, every one declaring it " a fine eld tune,* though, to say t
1736. Tim sang the song, and Eliza by playing Patrick's Day, which she had wedding. s
1737.ing Patrick's Day, which she had wedding. she said, for the Mr. it O'Callaghan t
1738. Garry the Owen by Mrs. time our wedding-day comes round ? — eh, Reilly ?" if
1739.ey contrived to give the did, of drawing out a series of genealogical tales. Eve
1740.y of her ancient line Seriously speaking," said O'Callaghan, " the feeling of ou
1741.eaking," said O'Callaghan, " the feeling of our people runs strongly against sec
1742.at, in than the men. is There no denying the Ireland, there a certain stigma att
1743.and forbid the If there be any one thing is for which to honor our valued friend
1744.mory Hers 1" is the widowhood of filling the heart — and so mine, too he added
1745. her in her grave. Ah there is something here" and he laid his hand on his with
1746.th tears. ! heart ; " there is something here which forbids even the thought of
1747.marriage." The conversation was becoming painfully serious, and Tim Flanagan was
1748.rious, and Tim Flanagan was just corning out with one of his dry jokes (though i
1749. clatter of wheels, and the loud ringing of the door-bell, announced the return
1750.nstant all was bustle and excitelaughing, talking, and " keeping up the fun," me
1751.l was bustle and excitelaughing, talking, and " keeping up the fun," ment seemed
1752.d excitelaughing, talking, and " keeping up the fun," ment seemed to be regarded
1753.to be regarded as a sort of duty growing out of ; the occasion. The sapper was d
1754.e who were all impatient for the dancing to commence. When it did commence, it w
1755. Mrs. Blake in splendid style, remarking at the same timo that it was a great pi
1756.do it pretty well, children, considering that I have three score and five years
1757.my old feet at Edward Flanagan's wedding. Go oif now bless to your sets, childre
1758.e. God your kind hearts." in the evening the good old gentleman had asked Blake
1759. tte young lady shrank from " exhibiting with an old fel- Early low like that,"
1760.rstand. Ellie polite refusal was a thing he could Annie Sheridan danced with him
1761.riend of her family when he was exerting himself " to keep up the fun !" Alas fo
1762.he dance most animated, she was thinking of Zachary and Jane, and Arabella, and
1763.ry and Jane, and Arabella, and wondering what they were about just then. Still,
1764.udest, and the music gayest, the evening passed pleasantly away, with laugh, jes
1765.ith laugh, jest, and song, and sparkling of sadness and the national dances of t
1766. of the Irish, to their heart-enlivening music. Not a shade was visible on any b
1767. whether young or till came for breaking up, and it was very natural that Edward
1768.testify some degree of sorrow on leaving her son " Still, I don't grudge him to
1769.of sons, and I'm sure you'll My blessing and the find him the best of husbands.
1770. find him the best of husbands. blessing of God be with you both, now and for ev
1771.at of Eliza), the time ; look at parting. As for Tom Reilly, that evening existe
1772.parting. As for Tom Reilly, that evening existence. In his was an epoch in his c
1773.oor Tom never intended to have a wedding MR. of his HENRY T BLAKE. 243 lived, fo
1774.e always looked back on Edward's wedding as the oasis in the desert of his monot
1775.ears did it in — Now, that " lingering haunt the greenest spot On memory's was
1776.te." must turn Edward Flanagan's wedding is over, we our attention to Mr. Henry
1777., love gave place to ambition, a craving desire for popularity. ; and, as the su
1778.chary Thomson, " let as see what's going on amongst the Repealers. It will be in
1779. to be hereafter think will by attending a few Repeal meetings, and spouting for
1780.ding a few Repeal meetings, and spouting for half an hour or so, I it be well wo
1781.nity, whereupon the two worthies evening's sallied forth, laughing heartily at t
1782.rthies evening's sallied forth, laughing heartily at the pseudo-heroic parts the
1783.id " All right." ' — On found reaching the Hall, situated it on Broadway, they
1784. had considerable difficulty in reaching the platform occupied by the speakers.
1785.occupied by the speakers. the two Having exchanged nods with the Chairman, who w
1786.ise the Chairman that he purposed making some remarks, and that functionary avai
1787.ry availed himself of the to the meeting " first opportunity to present to Mr. H
1788.e was the signal for still louder Bowing gracefully and gratefully, Mr. Blake ap
1789. his mouth and spoke. He began by saying that — he had not the honor of being
1790.g that — he had not the honor of being born in Ireland, but he was proud to sa
1791.ened with his strength, until very being. had become a part of To love Ireland,
1792.KES AND FLANAGANS. life, if that evening to offer his fortune, and his in necess
1793. was received with enthusiastic cheering, which having at length subsided, he pr
1794.with enthusiastic cheering, which having at length subsided, he proceeded to tha
1795.sided, he proceeded to thank the meeting for their truly Irish welcome, thus fre
1796.ds Ireland, a nation otherwise deserving of his veins, yet and a corresponding i
1797.ng of his veins, yet and a corresponding indignation against her oppressor all r
1798.ld not, like his friend, boast of having Irish blood in he could say, and must b
1799.ge of Ireland's history, without feeling for her unmerited sufferings ? He, for
1800.heers. ) Mr. Thomson concluded by saying that he hoped they would all live to se
1801. in its place, have no notion of letting it interfere with any more rational amu
1802.I, if it keeps the girls so long waiting." " Nonsense, Zachary, they can well wa
1803.sis that Zachary could not help laughing. Good humor thus restored, our two " fr
1804.ned their steps accordingly. On reaching home, they found Mrs. Henry and Miss Bl
1805.ss Blake, and the Misses Thomson waiting in full dress, with more or less discon
1806.as they are here represented, spout- ing patriotism from their mouths, while the
1807. well sift if our warm-hearted, trusting people would carefully public men, or w
1808.ital the same time that Mr. Henry giving his attention to Repeal, there arose, i
1809.e and imperfectly sketched in my opening chapters as growing out of the iniquito
1810.etched in my opening chapters as growing out of the iniquitous propagandism of t
1811.d continued magnitude with every passing year, until was found absolutely necesF
1812.tholic children, at any cost, from being exposed to their pestiferous influence.
1813.other rare qualities. To his penetrating his people eye, the pit prepared for th
1814., which admi- and distributed, according to its own good plea- sure, the funds p
1815. prevent their children from attend- ing the Schools at all, or to cause an enti
1816.ounded in b n oad daylight, at a meeting held in Tammany Hall, foi 252 BLAKES AN
1817.AGANS. the express purpose of condemning the course pursued by the Bishop, as th
1818.he b'hoys," and could hardly get putting in a word for several minutes, till the
1819.est and longest bow, thanked the meeting for the cordial reception given him, an
1820.ion, a question which involved the being and prosperity of the great Republic. f
1821.iced to have that opportunity of bearing public testimony to the excellence of t
1822.those schools through a nar- row feeling of bigotry, and, he thought he might ad
1823. of free-born Americans, no such feeling could ever find a resting-place. He was
1824.o such feeling could ever find a resting-place. He was a Catholic himself, and y
1825.expelled. who thus disturbed the meeting were at once A scene of indescribable c
1826.escribable confusion followed, it during which of the appeared that there was qu
1827.lanagan dropt into Miles Blake's, hoping, like Paul Pry, that he didn't On the f
1828.aul Pry, that he didn't On the following evening intrude. Oh ! no, on the contra
1829. that he didn't On the following evening intrude. Oh ! no, on the contrary, noth
1830.trude. Oh ! no, on the contrary, nothing could be his visit. I'll more acceptabl
1831.lazed up merrily though a real rejoicing in the genial presence of a man with "
1832.Miles ! I see by the papers this morning that Henry made a great speech at the m
1833.Henry made a great speech at the meeting in Tammany Hall last night. He's coming
1834. in Tammany Hall last night. He's coming stir out strong against the Bishop." 11
1835.never coolly. knew him to be in anything else," said Tim, "I wish to goodness he
1836.." 11 There's not much fear of him doing that," said Miles, wife, warmly. " I do
1837. all — suppose !" he'll be for getting up Catholic schools over, and commandin
1838.up Catholic schools over, and commanding the people other to send their children
1839.em, but " still I don't go so condemning them as the Bishop does." Now, Miles Bl
1840.as educated by ! Answer me, now shirking the question — do — and mind, there
1841.ed Tim, heedless of Miles's con- cluding words. Mrs. Blake burst into tears, and
1842.sed his pocket handkerchief, protracting the operation much longer than was nece
1843.id his sister ; there's no use in asking that question," " you know how that mat
1844. as ever broke bread. How does it loving, dutiful children, while yours are Cath
1845.ause we buried him in a Catholic burying-ground. There must be some cause for al
1846.stances of what we "Yes," said see going on all round us ?" Miles, angrily, "you
1847. ?" Miles, angrily, "you're just getting in back on the old story that kept us y
1848.on of mine had stood up at a 256 meeting B LAKES AND FLANAGANS. that for like of
1849.ced I hia good Bishop not." simply doing his duty, fa.ce could never I could loo
1850. wax wroth, and make a show of resenting Tim's freedom. " You're a hard-hearted,
1851.edom. " You're a hard-hearted, unfeeling man, Tim Flanagan — that's what you a
1852.you are, or you wouldn't come into thing to my own house, and tell me such a my
1853.me such a my very face." "As to my being hard-hearted," observed Tim, ''that's a
1854.u. But you know in your heart I'm saying what's true. Still, perhaps, I'm wrong
1855.. Still, perhaps, I'm wrong in reminding you of your misfortunes when it's too l
1856.y way of soliloquy. Virgin — one thing, now ing ! —what's it the reasou you
1857.soliloquy. Virgin — one thing, now ing ! —what's it the reasou you don't ? c
1858.come sometimes when nearly every evening. you're sitting here looking at each ot
1859.hen nearly every evening. you're sitting here looking at each other, and frettin
1860.ery evening. you're sitting here looking at each other, and fretting about what
1861.here looking at each other, and fretting about what can't be cured ?" Mrs. Blake
1862.st the temp- tation Reilly's 14 cracking all ?" a joke. What 1 Sheridans, and an
1863.ased the youngsters too long in choosing company. Now 11 we'll choose our own ag
1864.t away. Now let us return to the meeting at which Mr. himself so conspicuous. It
1865.that Zachary was unable to attend, owing to some previous arrangement for the ev
1866.ome previous arrangement for the evening. Henry was, going home alone, when, on
1867.gement for the evening. Henry was, going home alone, when, on the way, he was ac
1868.n. 1 guess you're about tired of passing for a Papist. Why not come out at once
1869. me, Blake. Folks never think of calling me mister. ! I hate titles as I hate he
1870.r, " and I gee own to a sort of a liking for you Didn't you me at the meeting to
1871.ing for you Didn't you me at the meeting to-night ?" " I can't say I did." " You
1872.' for you. I brought some of our rousing cheer. b'hoys there, just to give ! you
1873.well as most men. Do in remember a thing or two as. you remember Sam Herrick~-eh
1874.tive. You do, eh ? he was at the meeting to-night, though I guess you didn't see
1875.er — that's Sam's a brick, and nothing Many I a jolly good pieee of fun we've
1876.er. But guess you gentle'• men" laying a sneering emphasis on the word, are no
1877.ss you gentle'• men" laying a sneering emphasis on the word, are not — THE S
1878., I don't want to fird for you're making a man, real bold stand agaiust the prie
1879.ear home bo I'll only give you a parting advice. Come out at once from among the
1880.ists no more cant or humbug you're doing our work come over to us at once, then
1881.er to us at once, then no use straddling the fence. The Papists ain't half so st
1882.words on his lips. felt All that evening Henry Blake depression of forth all an
1883.ion, She was just then in an interesting usually and thought herself entitled to
1884., which, to say the truth, quite willing to give. " Henry was Why, I declare, He
1885.ht ! what on earth ails you ?" " Nothing particular, Jane," smile. said Henry, w
1886. meetiug go Eliza, who had been thinking more than she " said. tell Very well, i
1887.w I eon* that is at all times disgusting, to me, at least. new year's fess I eve
1888. Oh if that be all," said Jane, laughing, pity you much. If you want to use such
1889.you, we won't take Here's Zachary coming, I declare, so this evening." no more d
1890.chary coming, I declare, so this evening." no more dullness for Still Henry coul
1891. Henry could not forget Dillon's parting words. Not that he attached any particu
1892.uneral bell. were, and kept ever ringing in " Confound the fellow," said in he t
1893.t Dillon it might awaken your slumbering conscience met no more on earth. Follow
1894.nscience met no more on earth. Following the thread of our story, we must now pa
1895.ver some weeks, at the same time craving the reader's pardon if the scenes which
1896.t are not precisely to his or her liking. It was New Year's Eve, and the whole c
1897.was in joyous preparation for the coming festival. This was all very well, so lo
1898.an of licentious indulgence, overleaping every barrie* might oppose their progre
1899. or BLARES AND FLANAGANS. common feeling. York on distinguished as " the b'hoys.
1900.able numit ber of these rowdies took ing a visit en masse to into their heads to
1901.n a circuit of several streets, glutting themselves with everything they could e
1902.ets, glutting themselves with everything they could eat or drink, and then telli
1903.hey could eat or drink, and then telling the landlord or landlady, as the case m
1904.at is, if they ventured to hint anything about payment. In some places, the part
1905.e party ended their carousal by smashing their glasses in token of independence,
1906.to break the owner's head if threatening he attempted to remonstrate. Centre, Mu
1907.ed useful. it in his vest pocket, saying it might be In vain did the poor old bo
1908.erself, as she stood alternately looking after the depre- and eyeing the shatter
1909.tely looking after the depre- and eyeing the shattered remains of her little " W
1910.t, people, that's nrindin' their nothing else oh, dear ! An' ! to think of that
1911. of stones and every other that Shouting the most fearful imprecations and venge
1912.t the crash of shattered glass following their 864 rolley B L A K F. S A X D FLA
1913.es. They fled in all directions, leaving only a few, who, bolder than the rest,
1914.e whether their fallen chief was Turning had fallen on his face, they saw at a t
1915.uess he is —dead old what are we going to do with him ?" a herring " Why, take
1916.are we going to do with him ?" a herring " Why, take him home to be sure he has
1917.me, it was Watty Sullivan fellow, coming forward give me a hand some of you till
1918., — it would, indeed. !" No, no, bring him somewhere and God bless you " Go to
1919. if 1 1 you old hag ! where can we bring him not to his mother ?" " If there's n
1920.f«ai«r& RETRIBUTIVE JUSTICE. e*n bring him to 90* I'll my it little place down
1921.n break I'll to his mother. It's a thing I don't like to do, especially as he di
1922.a good Christian, out, they'd be willing to wash like that, his him and lay him
1923. have but a haythen they didn't anything to do with carcass." it But Molly repre
1924.er since they were able to hear anything. their horror of the unsanctified they
1925. of them volunteered dacent, God-fearing "When they all woman." five went into M
1926.or the likes of him !" The a first thing to be done was to cheer up the women wi
1927. wash the body, and while it was warming, Molly thought it the best thing to bre
1928.warming, Molly thought it the best thing to break the mournful tidings to the wr
1929.omen sat around which the stove, talking over the dreadful occurrence had brough
1930. ! I wish to goodness be a heartbreaking sight I we weren't here know well !" Mo
1931.ly opened, very Dillon appeared, leaning on slowly, and Mrs tear Not a was tic i
1932.emotion was a sort of asthmaIt breathing, or rather gasping. she could hardly su
1933.of asthmaIt breathing, or rather gasping. she could hardly support herself, enco
1934.ould hardly support herself, encouraging her with, " Come, now, Mrs. Dillon, dea
1935.ith the tenderest solicitude, beseeching her to try and bear this heavy blow aff
1936.t, as to stop its troublesome fluttering. Molly understood the mute answer, and
1937.e two before she could succeed in gaming hei pallet. little Then she made a move
1938.ed after her walk. Molly, longer, seeing her intention, begged of her to wait a
1939.on't look so God, don't With a trembling hand, Mrs. Dillon removed the cov ering
1940. hand, Mrs. Dillon removed the cov ering from off the body, and there she stood
1941.r wretched in his There he lay weltering blood, his eyes wide still open, and th
1942.e dark scowl of hatred and revenge ering on his low- The women covered their eye
1943.d. ally she Gradufell sunk to a kneeling posture, and her head After a pause of
1944.ere interposed, and would her, declaring that she insist if on removing she went
1945.declaring that she insist if on removing she went 01 fly in herself bo of " It's
1946.ck way." heart-broken mother do anything you bid me, Molly," said the poor " but
1947." said the poor " but what are you going to do with poor Hugh ? — Won't we you
1948. home?" There it was a sorrowful meaning difficult for the in the last word, tha
1949.died in his sins, without a minute's ing Oh I couldn't bear that-^-no, no, no !"
1950.er face with her hands, but said nothing. his cart, Jerry Dempsey came with and
1951.nfortunate mother take of any one during all that dismal night. In vain did Moll
1952.isery misery could unconscious), raising her eyes occasionally to heaven, and lo
1953.eyes occasionally to heaven, and looking every now and then towards the motionle
1954.d presence of death, and such horrifying death. The policemen smoked, and chatte
1955. silence even laughed, as though nothing strange had happened. Nor was the occur
1956.m under Mclij the public eye in anything but a favorable light. hastily interpos
1957. ! For God's sake — that was something new ; —thej if it guessed they never
1958.ej if it guessed they never did anything for God's sake before however, they wou
1959.ores hurted anybody." So Hugh's edifying adventures were his jury. dropped for t
1960.ury. dropped for that time. Next morning brought the coroner and inquest continu
1961.investigation. Jerry Dempsey was waiting with his cart, and the body was at leng
1962.ds brought her friends with her dwelling. once more to perform the duties of cha
1963.rance, and applied himself with edifying gence to comfort Hannah, whose grief wa
1964. it was all nonsense to talk of bringing a priest there for ; what ? on earth co
1965.her ? ! I say, mother! what are we going to do for a funeral and ask Tim Flanaga
1966.ted Watty, with a sudden gush of feeling the b'hoys. " Til go and hunt up some o
1967.ave than a pack of hypocritical, praying folk that he never cared a red cent for
1968.ith a fresh burst of clamo- rous weeping. All this time Molly Reynolds and two o
1969. corner near the poor mourner, regarding her with looks of tenderest compassion,
1970.st compassion, and occasionally offering her those little services which seemed
1971.a grave in the Potpossibility of getting permis- Field. There was no sion to int
1972.so his miserable mother had the crowning torture of seeing him consigned to unha
1973.other had the crowning torture of seeing him consigned to unhallowed earth. He w
1974.ozen of his former associates, including Jim and already unfavorably Bill, known
1975.ns. Who could Mrs. Dil? lon be following to the grave as chief mourner He !" loo
1976. altered man. Conscience kept whispering her reproachful accents not that hissin
1977.her reproachful accents not that hissing voice so terribly distinct. in the dept
1978.s' — a few new and Henry both pleasing cares. Just three weeks after the death
1979.t was the sides. and as the way of doing there was no word well. Mother and chil
1980. were The third day arrived, of anything like baptism, Mrs it Blake, senior, ven
1981.oumight give an answer without troubling me. You know as well as I do that I am
1982.hat you'll neither see nor hear anything of it." " But I want to know what's ; c
1983. in a querulous tone the use of hurrying so ?" " won't it just do as well able t
1984.at she had an instinctive fear of giving offence to her fine-lady daughter- and
1985.ptized. another appeal to the slumbering faith of her son. After clearing her th
1986.mbering faith of her son. After clearing her throat 276 •nee or BLARES AND FLA
1987. let your child be bo long without being baptized ?" Oh ! as to that," interpose
1988.e ! Mrs. Henry, I thought you were going to be a Catholic. Henry was so sure of
1989.ied the daughter-in-law, with increasing emphasis. " I'm sure of " Henry changin
1990.emphasis. " I'm sure of " Henry changing my religion. Did I never told that I ha
1991.eamed that you were in earnest in making such THE BAPTISM DISCUSSION. 271 a prop
1992., troubled look Whatever Henry was going to say, he was prevented by the nurse,
1993.ss her fears that Mrs. Henry was talking too much. cient to This was quite suffi
1994.of the child. She asked him was he going to let his child grow and she soon up a
1995. And so, Henry," said his mother, rising and going towards the door, " and so yo
1996.enry," said his mother, rising and going towards the door, " and so you're deter
1997.ES AND FLANAGANS. mind, will if anything happens before then, your blood fall on
1998.ember, the loss of a soul is no trifling what's come over you at all Oh, Henry M
1999. with a great show of tell back laughing to well he Jane what she had and how ha
2000.l skillful tender of tLe sick, was doing she could to fan the flame in the inter
2001.Positively, Henry, I must decline seeing your mother my more till I am quite rec
2002.t — EBENEZER. lhe could be sc annoying. 2*79 about that baptsm life ; Such a f
2003.ter on its head ; cried Jane, forgetting I should like to all about her impendin
2004.I should like to all about her impending fever "and know to what earthly good ca
2005. had some ;" Henry more modern name ling, said to himself, " I wish us to borrow
2006. — Ebenezer Blake syllable — nothing he does or says Ebe — ne — Blake !
2007.do will surprise me ! zer I" enunciating so as to bring out the full length and
2008.e me ! zer I" enunciating so as to bring out the full length and ! £80 BLARES A
2009. an unbaptized heathen — have nothing do with him take good care that — old
2010.hat'a I but, I'll I'll to let sbll- ling of our eh, Miles money he'll never hand
2011.f the whole set, wash our hands anything to they're turning out. But, for goodih
2012.sh our hands anything to they're turning out. But, for goodihis Tim about — he
2013. to insinuate, that it would be anything but advantageous to Ebenezer the Second
2014.progenitor. tion to This was a startling suggesin the Mrs. Henry, who, having be
2015.ing suggesin the Mrs. Henry, who, having been brought up religion of dollars all
2016.ly shrank from the prospect of depriving her beloved child of any She observed,
2017.tful tone, that there might be something in that. she was She would speak to pa
2018., 28) when Mrs. Miles Blake was kneeling going to bed, there at the hall door th
2019.when Mrs. Miles Blake was kneeling going to bed, there at the hall door that at
2020. in preparation for came a loud knocking one in the house himself, he start. mad
2021.elf, he start. made every The door being opened by Miles was confronted by Henry
2022.as fearful news cially for the believing parents, espe all Mrs. Blake, who forgo
2023. as their feet could carry them, praying the time that the poor innocent child m
2024.rs were not gathered the — on reaching Henry's house they found and consternat
2025.ad dead ! !" cried Mrs. Blake, snatching off the nurse's knee : "dead !" ! — h
2026.n sa its 1 corpse quietly down on Laying the little cradle-bed, Mrs Blake sat st
2027. Oh ! if I it had only taken the darling a private baptism that myself, left and
2028. aiu't there's no use in you reproaching yourself sure " it any fault of yours,
2029.e than this for I didn't send for making your strictures. you to ask your opinio
2030.as dead, and she would not be of weeping. Not that she had the slightest idea of
2031. slightest idea of his comforted. having sustained any loss in dying without bap
2032.rted. having sustained any loss in dying without baptism, but he was dead, dead
2033.n Scottish " sne was song left lamenting." for the first, That was a heavy blow
2034.w to Heury Blake and his wife time being. Mr. and Mrs. Pearson, too, were, at ve
2035.es," so he dropped as usual, one evening to Miles Blake's sitting-room, with his
2036.al, one evening to Miles Blake's sitting-room, with his ets, hands grave in in h
2037.his though the waggish smile was lurking around Jericho eyes and mouth. Miles, i
2038.er and, as Tim could not think J jesting on a subject of such awful importance p
2039. and Mary, and that, instead of twitting them with Henry's want of effects, reli
2040.amentable he had been actually condoling with them in the best of good ; faith.
2041. off that nasty habit of thrustit is ing his hands in his pockets," said Eliza,
2042.ual, but ! she said never a word. Bowing stiffly and formally to each of her par
2043.s Blake and his wife were still smarting with the first- keen self-reproach foll
2044. the first- keen self-reproach following on the death of Henry's born, without b
2045. many years before, posal with something events of the last when he would have r
2046.chary's offer, yet he shrank from giving his consent. — more opposed to the ma
2047. FLANAGANS. why ! said Zachary, laughing, " we've got to ; the bottom of your re
2048.f religion that you hesitate, in getting over that. I hope you enough to believe
2049.of interfer- no trouble well know me ing with Eliza's religion. tion such a thin
2050.with Eliza's religion. tion such a thing. Pshaw ! ! it is absurd to men- Come my
2051.es me. So you see there's no use setting your face against it." " Ja^e Pearson w
2052. my father I don't object to my marrying a Catholic. I see know *ak« you're not
2053.t ; it's all settled — so good morning Not a word now never mind. I see you're
2054. word now never mind. I see you're going to apologize. Bu; reli- 1 forgive you,
2055.religion. No ; fear of eh, me preventing a young one from being baptized ! Mr. i
2056.eh, me preventing a young one from being baptized ! Mr. is it is Blake no, nor c
2057.zed ! Mr. is it is Blake no, nor calling it Ebenezer ; my own name ; scriptural
2058.o prevent Mr. and Mrs. Blake from edging in a word of opposition to tional the m
2059.d intended to oppose it, so overpowering was Zachary's confidence, and so succes
2060. gone, they sat for some minutes looking at each other in silence, at their face
2061.the Pearsons." " Still there's something telling me that let Eliza we shouldn't
2062.sons." " Still there's something telling me that let Eliza we shouldn't marry a
2063.d Mrs. Blake, with a " we've had warning enough to make us but, then, there was
2064.ke us but, then, there was no such thing as refusing wise Zachary. And besides,
2065.hen, there was no such thing as refusing wise Zachary. And besides, I know very
2066.d be!" Poor Mrs. Blake talked of leaving the result to God, when she was acting
2067.g the result to God, when she was acting against her own religious convictions,
2068. own religious convictions, and allowing her daughter to walk deliberately into
2069.ted in direct opposition to the teaching of his Church, and how can they be bles
2070. her pa and ma any longer. When anything went wrong with Henry or Jaue, she said
2071.ary kept Eliza's own and found rejoicing. it to his advantage. in question, disp
2072. way To justice, he had a sort of liking for the old couple, and was desirous to
2073.sirous to spare them the pain of knowing what their daughter had said of them. d
2074. them. do him Mrs. Blake went, according to promise, to ask Dr she Power had to
2075.vice suitable Dr. to the approachall ing change in her condition. to say, then s
2076.uld have any good should be very willing to do what " I you ask, but I cannot ho
2077.ve you found your son's marriage turning out so well that you are contracting a
2078.ing out so well that you are contracting a similar alliance your daughter ?" Mrs
2079.Mrs. Blake quailed beneath the searching eye that was fixed upon her, and a deep
2080.ay, and Dr. Power thought the best thing he could do for her was to put an jnd t
2081. fact is, Mrs. Blake," said he, standing up, " the fact in that I can do nothing
2082. up, " the fact in that I can do nothing for you this matter. If you permit your
2083.son, whom you describe as so captivating," he added, with a smile, " my 13 previ
2084. and duty both dictate. — Good morning — ! there is a person waiting to see
2085. morning — ! there is a person waiting to see me in the lext room " Mrs. Blake
2086.iles's indepen- (the old leaven breaking out again) and Mrs. so pleased that she
2087.o assist her mother- in-law in preparing for the wedding. Miles, thus encouto th
2088.her- in-law in preparing for the wedding. Miles, thus encouto the very letter vi
2089. (in compli- of St. Peter's, Power being, of course, out of the question, and TH
2090.D 291 Hooker Tomkins, the favo"A burning and rite preacher of the Thomson family
2091.reacher of the Thomson family. a shining light " was Tomkins in the conventicle
2092.ion." Fer vent, indeed, was the blessing wherewith Hooker Tom kins blessed the u
2093.ed from the door of the Wesleyan meeting-house on a tour through They were accom
2094.tes. Arabella Thomson, her sister having given her hand and fortune some months
2095.onored with an invitation to the wedding party, held on the return of the happy
2096. and Margaret. of the family Their going was agreed upon at a family meeting hel
2097.oing was agreed upon at a family meeting held on the previous evening. None of t
2098.ily meeting held on the previous evening. None of the ciders would go, and yet t
2099.y thought that to it would be anjr thing but safe to expose womanhood, 11 two yo
2100.ood, 11 two young girls just approaching the chance of making acquaintances whic
2101.ls just approaching the chance of making acquaintances which girls," said they c
2102.'ll have opportunities enough of showing turing into dangerous company. without
2103.e opportunities enough of showing turing into dangerous company. without venlitt
2104.n't want my Ellie or Susie to be getting acquainted with persons that we don't k
2105.er hard to have the girls miss a wedding. Isn't girls ?" it's " Well, true we wo
2106.e opposed to it, of course there nothing more to be said. ?" We can spend Can't
2107.appily at home. we, Susie dear "Sour ing ; grapes, my dear sisters !" said Edwar
2108.ry much," added Susie, " for defend- ing our reputation as dutiful daughters. fe
2109., my saucy little sister I" said tapping her playfully on the cheek sure you run
2110. them a visit at their handsome dwelling in Fourth street, hi the course of conv
2111.though he partly guessed what was coming. " For mercy's sake, Zachary," interpos
2112.folly uncle Tim is so fond of ; cracking jokes that if you tell him I shall neve
2113.n of her cheek, that there was something more than a joke in question. plainly,
2114. he had was. his own reasons for wishing to know w^'at it " Well," said Zachary,
2115. were so forgetful of poor any one being forbidden to eat meat on fish that day,
2116.nintentional neglect of others, by going without either fish or flesh, until I g
2117.alf persuaded and threatened into eating meat." " Indeed ! and how did you manag
2118. a meal of for one day, without breaking the commandments of the Church." are El
2119.y was the worst," he went on, addressing himself to that, Tim ; " after Eliza ne
2120.s a judgment on her," he added, laughing. " Well, are you done ?" asked Eliza, r
2121.ell, are you done ?" asked Eliza, rising from her she felt poorly, Beat in evide
2122.t agitation. " Can you remember anything more ?" her laughing husband, who " had
2123.u remember anything more ?" her laughing husband, who " had another camrather en
2124.es, I can," replied We paign about going to church on Sunday first Sunday, and I
2125.pale and flushed and her voice quivering with emotion. THORNS IX THE PATH. littl
2126.ad gone a dear, are too far, and drawing : her to him, he said, in a soothing to
2127.ing : her to him, he said, in a soothing tone " you serious ? surely you cannot
2128.ore," said Tim, briskly to hear anything that Eliza, we don't want my dear ! wou
2129.ain. Cheer up, there's no use in letting your spirits sink for trifles. tell I o
2130.ey with the weight of Tomkins's blessing on your back." Why, don't you think, Un
2131.smile, " that our Mr. Tomkins's blessing you for is just as good 1' as your Fath
2132.?" "May God said Tim. forgive " I making such a comparison, wouldn't mention the
2133. you may guess what and ! and so saying, Tim took bye, up his h*t stick. " Good
2134.hompson I'm glad to see you both looking so w^ll your unlucky journey. Next time
2135.cky journey. Next time you go travelling, Eliza, I'd advise you to hang conscien
2136.AGANS. Tim," said he, "There's something about your Uncle 11 that makes one like
2137., even when he says what ona Now, coming from any one else, would have certainly
2138.be angry with him. his There's something so frank and good-natured about him, an
2139. seems so earnest and sincere just going to say in his Catholicity till — I wa
2140.Well, I don't care," said Eliza, pouting, " he had no business to speak so. I de
2141. to have I good hopes of you, my darling girl. was afraid enough for the wife of
2142. than gave you credit for 1 Are we going Eliza answered his to spend the evening
2143. Eliza answered his to spend the evening at in the affirmative, office, telling
2144.g at in the affirmative, office, telling his my father's ?" and then Zachary hur
2145.ed Margaret, INFLUENCE OF EARLY TRAINING as ahe placed 297 two chairs near the f
2146.nough, Maggie, my dear we were uj paying a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Zachary Thomson
2147.amiable that it is hard to see her going astray. It is very strange that both br
2148.fact is all the effect of early training, and early associations. From their you
2149., both Henry and Eliza have been keeping company with Protestants, taught by Pro
2150. their BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. and looking up to Protestants as far superior to Ca
2151. to Catholics how could they be anything else but what they tants — are, as re
2152.n't think I shall go." "We heard nothing of it," said Tim. "We are not polished
2153.uldn't ask the Thomsons with- out asking their right hand — I mean I their lef
2154. that looks like the very best of living !" Mrs. Flanagan laughed as she pointed
2155.Tim hasn't a fine red face of his saying, own ; don't you know the old houses Ti
2156.t people that eh, live in glass throwing stones " Tim ?" You have me there, Nell
2157.onded Tim, quickly. " If he were hanging with monds he no ! shouldn't have anyth
2158.th monds he no ! shouldn't have anything to say to her. No for ! no Protestant s
2159. is a very good young man, ; and getting on very his well in business but let hi
2160. wants one." INFLUENCE OF EARLY TRAINING "But bow do you know arch smile. " 299
2161.uietly. " But will ever we're forgetting ourselves altogether, Tim dear, as we a
2162.hen we come here. come down this evening, Margaret, you and Edward, for you know
2163.ER PARTY XYIII. THE MISFORTUNE OF HAVING 4 WEAK STOMACH. Edward Flanagan would h
2164.," " and I must own I have little liking for their Still I company. wish you to
2165.e dissatisfied with Henry for not having invited father and mother. He found a n
2166.s party already assembled in the drawing-room, whiling away the tedious half-hou
2167.y assembled in the drawing-room, whiling away the tedious half-hour before dinne
2168.r uncle This he could not help remarking to Mrs old folks Henry " Blake. ! Oh re
2169.inly a satisfactory reason for " cutting the connection," and Edward it could no
2170.n," and Edward it could not help smiling at out. the naivete with which came He
2171.ourse no one could expect any such thing." There were two ministers at the table
2172. and the other a tall, me^ncholy-looking man, who announced the word These gengu
2173. the word These genguests of the evening, and, as such, were to the Baptists of
2174. the Conversation went on briskly during dinner, being chiefly of the light and
2175.ion went on briskly during dinner, being chiefly of the light and cursory kind w
2176.with our friend Edward, and kept talking to him across the table whenever an opp
2177.k you," fish. said Henry, with something like a I blush on his face, " I am doin
2178.like a I blush on his face, " I am doing very well just now. never eat May I tro
2179.only too happy to be so troubled. Having helped Henry, he renewed his attack on
2180. — when we see such men as you giving them an example. Allow me to ask what t
2181.e. Allow me to ask what the vulgar doing these things good do you expect to deri
2182.good do you expect to derive from dining on of flesh ?" " fish instead And very
2183. your question, as I might do, by saying that I have as much right to eat fish a
2184.dent that not a word of what was passing was lost on him. This Edward saw, and h
2185.sorry for it, ; as he shrank from giving unnecessary pain to any one Still, he h
2186. conscience, or in honor, decline giving his opinion when cient asked. Tomkins l
2187.suffrages of the company, and, receiving suffi- encouragement from every eye, th
2188.sm. You can have one any time by sending to my house." The laugh was turned agai
2189. ' Tomkins affected to be very ; carving of his turkey his thin, piping voice mu
2190.; carving of his turkey his thin, piping voice much engaged with the but Milmore
2191. Milmore came to his support ; gathering strength as he proceeded. He '• took
2192.wise teachings of the Church. Abstaining from meat on sucb I consider as a publi
2193.n act of cowardice to shrink from making that profession here the or elsewhere.
2194.Edward's full on him. He was just taking wine trifling with Mrs. Green, which ga
2195.on him. He was just taking wine trifling with Mrs. Green, which gave him an excu
2196.ld have renewed the discussion by asking Edward^ ironically, did the Church perm
2197.him to use wine ? " Instead of answering your question," said Edward, " I will a
2198.ill ask you to do me the favor of taking wine with " me. I must positively decli
2199. me. I must positively decline answering irrelevant queswith a cheerful smile. t
2200. Zuinglius, a Knox, and a Wesley, having all and each some little remlant of the
2201.." Very possibly," said Edward, laughing at the odd the " It were a catalogue of
2202.o motley group of proud, soul-destroying heresiarchs could such a How company ;
2203.lemen followed the ladiea to the drawing-room, a corner. " I say, ; Joe Smith dr
2204.las, " I like to see man or woman acting up tc thoughtfully. iheir convictions."
2205.see his clear through reli gion, a thing I never could do yet, let me try ever s
2206.rican, ''I in know," said Joe I'd eating and drinking what he likes." " but even
2207. know," said Joe I'd eating and drinking what he likes." " but even so, I can re
2208.Flanagac does, for I don't like shirking let a man be either one thing or anothe
2209.e shirking let a man be either one thing or another Silas laughed. he, — that'
2210.rtly. " But come, there's somebody going to sing, I believe." During the remaind
2211.But come, there's somebody going to sing, I believe." During the remainder of th
2212.mebody going to sing, I believe." During the remainder of the evening Joe kept q
2213.ve." During the remainder of the evening Joe kept quite Edward Flanagan, wonderi
2214.oe kept quite Edward Flanagan, wondering how a man could be so intelligent, so p
2215.was agreeably surprised to fine* feeling, frank Joe Smith really susceptible of
2216.re the two were seated with " are coming forward to you making interest I warn y
2217. with " are coming forward to you making interest I warn you in time that " his
2218. went if you could ever dream of wedding a daughter of their house. I have heard
2219. Joe turned his eye on Edward, expecting to laugh at this sally, as see him he t
2220. see him he termed it, but no such thing, he " had grown you speak quite serious
2221.e the addresses of a Protestant, knowing him for such." " and why not, pray ?" "
2222.TY. " Precisely so," in 309 said nothing to lose Edward, calmly. " They have poi
2223.eep clear of them while they're fighting squabbling as they are. Now, just look
2224.f them while they're fighting squabbling as they are. Now, just look at Tomkins
2225.good host here his eloquence in carrying on a suit — all are doing their best
2226. in carrying on a suit — all are doing their best to earn the dollar." manner,
2227.t he invited him to tea on the following evening. Pd advise you Never to ; keep
2228.ited him to tea on the following evening. Pd advise you Never to ; keep the girl
2229.r. Smith to have a quiet, social evening with 310 as B LAKES AND FLANAGANS. Marg
2230.ess him favorably. He must see something more of us Catholics." them whom I have
2231. they are that fast and keep from eating meat, and pray, and go to ;" confession
2232. " do you go to confession idea of being commanded and Joe laughed at into any t
2233.manded and Joe laughed at into any thing. — if it's a fair question ?" " Quite
2234.e a month or ! so." " Once a month thing I Well, if that ain't the queerest I co
2235.the queerest I couldn't That's something I could never do. stand that, any how."
2236.I shall expect — you to-morrow evening." " Might I bring Silas Green ?" it. "
2237. you to-morrow evening." " Might I bring Silas Green ?" it. " Oh, certainly —
2238.go now, know Margaret * ill be expecting me.'' THE DINNER PVRTY. M 311 list I'm
2239.ave really spent a very pleasant evening. " Good-night." When Edward got home, h
2240.her father had gone early in the evening to see Susan, and were not yet returned
2241. thought Edward, " when they are staying so he went himself to see what was goin
2242.so he went himself to see what was going surprised to find Susan lying on the so
2243. was going surprised to find Susan lying on the sofa on. in late ;" so He very w
2244.ile Margaret and Eliza sat by her sewing gently. Mr. O'Callaghan, Mr. and Mrs. F
2245.nd Mrs. Flanagan, and John, were playing cards at a little distance. " So there
2246.wo hours ago. You look well this evening." " And I feel well, too, Edward," repl
2247. " ; or what is word ?" "They're working for me," girls, it's it, that you canno
2248.with sudden animation they're a covering for my little altar it that making, and
2249.ering for my little altar it that making, and I'm just waiting to see finished b
2250.tar it that making, and I'm just waiting to see finished before I go to bed. You
2251.AKES AND FLANAGANS. is to-morrow evening, Edward, when the altar r: finished, il
2252.rse, Oh ! it will be so beautiful. going to say the Rosary there for the future,
2253.r prayers." " Well, but you're not going to be worse, Susan," said her brother,
2254. worse, Susan," said her brother, trying hard to keep back the tears that would
2255.t any more. Why, what are you all crying for ?" she " If you go on so, it added,
2256.she " If you go on so, it added, looking round in surprise. will make me cry, to
2257.ither can nor ought to mourn for leaving the earth. Even yourselves ought to be
2258.d though, I fear, you are not— knowing that I can do you more good there," and
2259.e," and she pointed upwards, this spring, rather — — — ; — — — " tha
2260.arth." " Susie, dear," said John, rising hastily from the table, u I can't liste
2261.ell you, there's no fear of your d jring there were you couldn't talk so. " Keep
2262.is tears ; said his father, after wiping away comes. to I " sorrow's time enough
2263.usie able go about again." Then lowering his voice to a whis- per, he said to hi
2264." Don't, for your let her eee you crying. sees always grieves her when it she !
2265.nd her, John — the two of them hanging over But don't look round. and each hol
2266.But don't look round. and each hold- ing a hand. I don't want Susie to see us wa
2267.d. I don't want Susie to see us watching them." Mr. O'Caliaghan had let his card
2268. cards fall on the table, and sat gazing with moistened eyes on the beautiful pi
2269.dren such as they are." Edward," raising Blake's? kins ?" " fuily how did you ge
2270.y dear si V replied Edward, appreciating the old gentleman's kind intention, and
2271.ntleman's kind intention, and it Willing to second as far as he ccr>ld " ; we ha
2272.re, we had a regular set-to about eating meat on Friday." M How is that ?" said
2273.fully campaign with part in it. avoiding Henry's ?" But Tim put the question dir
2274.Edward's announcement that he was coming to tea next evening was received witk g
2275.t that he was coming to tea next evening was received witk general satisfaction,
2276.no less than ask him to spend an evening at our house. " I am glad to find that
2277. don't you ask Arthur Brown some evening ?— it is hardly fair to treat him so
2278. to imaginable, without see her laughing in the easiest way eveo the shade of a
2279.heek She was THE DINNER PARTY. 315 going to say something, but her mother was to
2280.DINNER PARTY. 315 going to say something, but her mother was too quick for her.
2281.an answer for she wouldn't have anything to say to one of his sort." By this tim
2282.een them. she, how it fitted, supporting " See what a baby I am," said can't wit
2283." Susan shook her head, but said nothing. felt She knew Mr. O'Callaghan did not
2284., but she grateful for his left soothing kindness, and smiled her thanks as she
2285.s, and was Tim who first spoke, clearing his throat with a effort. vigorous "
2286. out better than wo What ? are you going to do about that poor Mrs. Dillon Ever
2287. married that Sullivan, things are going on, you know, worse can't leave the poo
2288.atty has always a set of rowdies hanging about the house, drinking when they can
2289.owdies hanging about the house, drinking when they can get 316 BLAKES AND FLANAG
2290.16 BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. all and cursing and swearing It's best to the time like
2291. FLANAGANS. all and cursing and swearing It's best to the time like troopers. ta
2292.them altogether " "I was little thinking, Tim," said his wife, I'd nad no objeti
2293.y, " it shouldn't prevent us from taking her. She's a desolate pocr creature, an
2294." " bless you, She'll Nelly, and morning. be as go for her to-morrow welcome as
2295. me You may go for her to-morrow morning, and bring her here to spend the remain
2296. go for her to-morrow morning, and bring her here to spend the remainder of her
2297.agan's household, and from early morning the whole family was up and o'clock, st
2298.hole family was up and o'clock, stirring. Even Susan got out of bed about eight
2299. down stairs to the family and if eating-roora, though, to say the truth, she lo
2300.. All the family were present, including Edward, Margaret, and Mr O'Callaghan, a
2301.llaghan, and when Susan entered, leaning on John's arm, and followed closely by
2302.t him I shall be present, sir ?" turning to her father. Yes, my child, I word by
2303. child, I word by John yesterday morning." now, mother dear, you better, father;
2304.as to strengthen her for the approaching ceremony, which must necessarily be a l
2305.sarily be a long They were still sitting at table when Dan Sheridan one. ' " So
2306., then, what cried in ; Dan, on entering to start before now." "Just listen to h
2307." "Just listen to him," said " lecturing others, and, the world are you about he
2308.ts What in are you at now, Mike I coming by another door. ?" inquired Mrs. Reill
2309.. Reilly, " I thought I heard you saying something about me, suppose you're crac
2310." I thought I heard you saying something about me, suppose you're cracking a jok
2311.ething about me, suppose you're cracking a joke at poor Sally's expense." Mike d
2312.omical set the youngsters all a-laughing. " No, the double ordination. indeed, S
2313.; at you." the time for was only telling u& them this morning with split stories
2314.or was only telling u& them this morning with split stories. He says he nearly h
2315. his sides He needn't say any such thing," replied Mrs. Reilly, with solemn grav
2316. solemn gravity, " for there was nothing laughable in what I told them. I was on
2317.hat I told them. I was only just telling them about the ordination of my I poor
2318.id the kind-hearted creature, forgetting her proud remembrances " Why, in the jo
2319.remembrances " Why, in the joy of seeing Susan looking so well. then, indeed, I'
2320. Why, in the joy of seeing Susan looking so well. then, indeed, I'm glad to see
2321.d, I'm glad to see you here this morning I I didn't feel altogether well myself,
2322.ouldn't miss the chance of T>less seeing ; Peter I and Thomas ordained. they'll
2323.nt where he and Mike had been consulting a matter of some moment significantly.
2324.it r open a secret, but you're not going to hear as fast as !" just yet. Get rea
2325.e hour you can, for you see it s getting pointing to a handsome French time* pie
2326.u can, for you see it s getting pointing to a handsome French time* piece on the
2327.es more and the whole party were walking the grand aisle of St. Patrick's cathed
2328.rs at the same time. Tears were coursing each other down the cheeks of the mothe
2329.for those It dear ones who were entering on so holy a state. wag the summit of e
2330.hers and mothers, and the inward feeling of their hearts was like that of the de
2331.y salvation." ! O in peace, were leaving the church, Susan lingered on her knees
2332.in her heavy eyesf did you stand looking back so, Susie in a " Why V said Margar
2333. Susan, with a calm smile, "I was taking leave of the church and the altar and H
2334. with gracious assistance." Next morning our two young mass priests said their f
2335.spective parents, the two families being THE DOUBLE ORDINATION 821 •gain prese
2336.fternoon she had the happiness of seeing Thomas, " who cheered her with who was
2337.t he would say mass for her next morning. And I, too," said it Peter, in present
2338.uch for juu, dear Susan." " And just ing for ever since I is what I have been wi
2339.ever since I is what I have been wishing and praysaw where my illness was to end
2340.my illness was to end. It so encouraging to think that sacrifice my own is broth
2341.: Ah God happy we were yesterday morning to see you all present. But I was sorry
2342. that happen ?" if Oh ! that was nothing strange you knew but all," returned his
2343.n to tell Henry. The same Henry is going on at a rate on the broad road. He has
2344. Susan, Mr. he added, in a soliloquizing " isn't strange to think that little Pe
2345.provided for us. But you asked mc, doing well." sir, He what I thought of Susan.
2346. be here, if possible, when I am setting out on my long journey. Tell them to co
2347.e to gee me that pared to-morrow evening, gee if they can at all, for I do want
2348.riend that he feared Susan waa " talking too much. She looks quite faint," said
2349. her so much changed. He thought morning. it advisable to administer the last sa
2350.st sacraments " without delay, promising to bring the holy Viaticum uext And now
2351.ents " without delay, promising to bring the holy Viaticum uext And now good-bye
2352.ght the good pitied It is ; my for being called so soon to receive and are rathe
2353.reward. I pity these," he added, turning to her now weeping parents yet, "it is
2354.e," he added, turning to her now weeping parents yet, "it is these is, whom all,
2355.you Susan will see that God indeed going to is good to you. Your dear leave you,
2356. may reasonis ' ably hope that she going to the better land,' there to await you
2357.better land,' there to await your coming. for that Rejoice in the Lord, my frien
2358. my friends / he gave you grace to bring up your children for ! places iu the ev
2359.children for ! places iu the everlasting mansions And will you, Ellen, let your
2360.ted again the world of spirits So saying, he left the room, leaving behind him a
2361.its So saying, he left the room, leaving behind him an indescrib- able feeling o
2362.ng behind him an indescrib- able feeling of tranquil resignation Next morning Su
2363.ing of tranquil resignation Next morning Susan for the last time, received the B
2364.d one, in fervent Lefore it. her glazing eyes, so that her last glance upon All
2365.lt prayer, and the prayers for the dying were read by Thomas. Susan had taken le
2366. of every and received the last blessing of her father and mother at her own req
2367.hat fair young girl surrounded by loving hearts and tearful eyes, and fervent su
2368.eyes, and fervent suppliants petitioning God in on her behalf. She was passin in
2369.God in on her behalf. She was passin ing away from earth The the freshness and b
2370.there transition. was no horror, nothing painful will, the sufferings of long mo
2371.hanged glances, and the latter, stooping ; down, kissed the marble-like brow of
2372.he room there arose the voice of wailing. But the two nuns and the young u : pri
2373.o nuns and the young u : priest, raising their voices above the rest, said Why s
2374.r and mother from the room, and, waiting in the parlor, they found Henry Blake H
2375.fter night, so I all, there is something in religion ; those nuns looked like an
2376.you !" said his years, uncle, addressing him, for the first time in many by is t
2377.fit to your soul, in the way of exciting whole- is some reflection, I for one wo
2378.rse for us 1" Mrs. Flanagan said nothing. Her only ; feeling for the moment was
2379.lanagan said nothing. Her only ; feeling for the moment was one was dead, and, l
2380.d Henry wi'.b took his departure, saying that he would come back 626 Jane in BLA
2381.AND FLANAGANS, the course of the evening. All that day and the for- next Henry w
2382.t, and ne would not thank any one having likened the nuns to who reminded him of
2383.his angels. Henry had no idea of passing- for a devotee, and so the salutary imp
2384.ke went an early mass one Sunday morning, and went to see her daughter during th
2385.ing, and went to see her daughter during the time of high mass. was, she wanted
2386.n to fear that she neglected all, having even that solemn obligation. She was ag
2387.t She didn't feel very well this morning, and so he persuaded her to go with him
2388.was out at six o'clock mass this morning, thanks be to God, and when I came in i
2389.me in it's what she scolded me for going I'm afraid out so early. all " You'll n
2390. the I think I heard him and her talking and laughing inside at a great rate. De
2391.I heard him and her talking and laughing inside at a great rate. Depend upon it,
2392. poker and gave her fire such a stirring up that it " won* Perhaps thera dered w
2393.rnin'" which she had been apostrophizing so affectionately. Mrs. Thomson was qui
2394., it would seem in possession on finding her mother of the parlor. " Why, dear m
2395.he parlor. " Why, dear me, ma," throwing herself gracefully on the sofa, with he
2396.ly on the sofa, with her bonnet dangling by its ties from her I hand ; " dear me
2397.r me ! who would ever think of you being bell. here so early. Zachary, do ring t
2398.ng bell. here so early. Zachary, do ring the ; wonder what that stupid girl is a
2399. " I just came to see the mother, trying to keep how you were this morning," sai
2400.trying to keep how you were this morning," said down her anger, " but I see I ;
2401.u know, and It is all that sort of thing was quite the fashion there. altogether
2402. afternoon. " You must spend the evening with us," said she, " for we are so lon
2403.rselves." " In that case, you must bring pa here, ma I" said Eliza, " for Henry
2404.ee we can't go." Are the Pearsons coming ?" " Yes, ma, I rather think so." " Wel
2405. Blake, with a smile of doubtful meaning brightstill ening her handsome face. Go
2406.le of doubtful meaning brightstill ening her handsome face. Good came bye, Eliza
2407.omise, Eliza, dear !" he said, mimicking her mother's tone. to the minute, " Be
2408.your comfortable bed next Sunday morning at half-past five and go right off to c
2409.our rare success in the art of mimicking. What would " fire, ma say I if she hea
2410.em, and the game " they will do anything, but once cross is up.' 7 You seem to f
2411.f the Celtic fire to make you a charming wife for Zachary Thomson. since refined
2412.omson. since refined into In the evening, when the whole family of the Pearsons
2413.he old lady had a pious fit this morning that Wasn't 11 made her undertake such
2414.rity. It is 1 really don't find anything either rich or ridiculous in it. nothin
2415.either rich or ridiculous in it. nothing but what a Catholic mother might be exp
2416.a " B LAKES AND FLANAGANS eye. kincfiing ?" " What foul play do you mean, else H
2417. Mrs. Pearson there were to come putting in her head every once you all a while
2418.ce you all a while like Paul Pry, asking ? : " Are good, regular folk here Do yo
2419.your prayers every night and all morning ?" There was something absurd present p
2420.t and all morning ?" There was something absurd present put, especially as knew
2421.ly. disclaim any such intention, willing affairs. Mrs. Pearson hastened to and d
2422.on I leave ! will me such a ! —turning grand inquisitor, indeed that to others
2423. in your Uncle Tim's parlor that morning." " I deny to fry." said Henry, laughin
2424." " I deny to fry." said Henry, laughing, " I have other fish " Do you mean mean
2425.ther. Indeed she has done the confessing of the for the last ten or twelve in wh
2426.observed Pearson, " that same confessing of one's never sins. I should I wasn't
2427.rought up a Papist, for that's something I think I could there are never get alo
2428.then superstition, are fast disappearing our favored country. every day growing
2429.g our favored country. every day growing less, —at least from is The number of
2430. have got ! — do let us have something of more general interest !" Eliza and I
2431. in St. Peter's Church, on the following He, accordingly, went round amongst his
2432. Peter's, so as to be in for the opening ceremonies, as Henry said. Zach Thomson
2433. Ellie used to say, " with their talking and pointing, and asking questions abou
2434.o say, " with their talking and pointing, and asking questions about everything
2435.h their talking and pointing, and asking questions about everything they saw, ju
2436.g, and asking questions about everything they saw, just as if they were in a the
2437.s over, and i;reat Viis attentive during the the music had again commenced, was
2438., took the matter very coolly. Reclining with graceful negligence in a corner of
2439.s attention was divided between watching the going on all effect of the music on
2440.n was divided between watching the going on all effect of the music on his compa
2441.he music on his companions, and pointing out to their observation the various in
2442. walked down the aisle together, talking in an audible what they had seen and he
2443.d. The Flanagans staid behind, unwilling to leave the Church in such dised'fying
2444. to leave the Church in such dised'fying company. " Well what do you think of th
2445. walked along together after son leaving the church. "The Bishop preaches well d
2446.of the head " but I don't way of talking. He seems to assume too much authority.
2447.CE. 3T» a Yes. and we were just talking of the sermon," said Thomson finds faul
2448.finds fault with the Bishop for gpeaking too much like a master." "And why not?"
2449. hope to save our souls " Talk of saving souls," said Mr. Pearson. forgive your
2450.earson. forgive your church for teaching that there is no salvation beyond her p
2451.ked Edward, at the same time endeavoring to repress a smile. " What to be our ru
2452.that O'Oallaghan could not help laughing. "Hardly sufficient 1" repeated Mr. Pea
2453.e ?" the voice of Why, How, God speaking within us, teaching us to do good and s
2454.y, How, God speaking within us, teaching us to do good and shun then, does ? it
2455.rmon conscience is equally accommodating while your conscience and mine allow ;
2456.conscience, be, as you say, the unerring voice of God ?" The others all laughed,
2457. on which he often held forth, insisting on it that the dictates of conscience w
2458.d Quaker said to his by way of a parting advice Make money, son, Obadiah honestl
2459.different words. Con oienoeia, according to yon, the divine law — the law and
2460.shall be happy to renew this interesting subject, but, the present, we part ? he
2461.th For instance, it would be interesting to examine what manner of conscience po
2462.ld a tale unfold conscience. ' regarding the peculiar ladies bent of many a !" G
2463.ar ladies bent of many a !" Good morning, and So he took the old gentleman's arm
2464.ked away, with a bow and a smile leaving the others to think and say what they p
2465.enry was nettled by his cousin's parting words. Perhaps he felt gentlemen that t
2466.ll amused, and had no particular feeling except that of tion at Pearson's discom
2467.seat in an easy-chair in Henry's drawing-room. " " Of whom do you speak, pa ?" i
2468." I'm quite sure of said Henry, laughing. could never understand the mysteries o
2469.my deai sir. Only think of his believing a grievous, nay, I might miss mass on S
2470.ny conceivable No matter how interesting And the subject on which he was convers
2471.d the subject on which he was conversing, the minute he reaches the church-door,
2472.or, in he goes. just the as for entering a Protestant place of toto. worship, hi
2473. " Certainly, Mike !" said Tim, standing up. dear," to his wife, " into the next
2474.h a mischievous It is instead. something " ; new," she added, glancing at Mike's
2475. something " ; new," she added, glancing at Mike's blushing face it something ne
2476." she added, glancing at Mike's blushing face it something new for Mike Sheridan
2477.ing at Mike's blushing face it something new for Mike Sheridan to have a secret.
2478. not, Mike V be sure it is worth keeping But Mike did not choose to answer. John
2479.ou know herself and all it — belonging to her ?" " Yes, indeed, Mike, we know
2480.rish at home, and we never knew anything but what was good of them. 11 They belo
2481.'m sure will make a good wife. One thing greatly in her favor, she was brought u
2482.w," said Mike, who was gradually getting over his bashfulness, "I'm glad to find
2483.course, could It never think of marrying Alice without their consent. a sort of
2484. my father. it is not very hard to bring my dear father to reason to put in a hi
2485.ickedness in him against any human being as well as I and if all fails you, you
2486.as I and if all fails you, you can bring him round at once on He'll not go beyon
2487.rds. " Oh as to that," said he, twirling his hat between ! his hands, "as to tha
2488. I must only take my chance. I'm willing to try my luck with Alice." " But why d
2489.hat and I have great hopes of succeeding qrord from the priest but you know your
2490. more than if any one else was preaching for a year to him." "I know that well e
2491.t I get my father's consent. I'm leaving that for the last chance." Mike ?" said
2492.t want to let Father Power know anything about the coolness at least, if I so, 1
2493. and your luck for it." Tim said nothing, but he shook Mike's hand so warmly ful
2494.ok Mike's hand so warmly full at parting, that Mike went away with the conscious
2495.eilly, as if suddenly that's remembering something, " did you hear of the match
2496.if suddenly that's remembering something, " did you hear of the match "What matc
2497.hy, Mike Sheridan and They say it* going to be, for certain. Ellie What are you
2498.for certain. Ellie What are you laughing at, " it We —you and John ?" ; were t
2499.it We —you and John ?" ; were thinking of poor Tom," said John "isn't first to
2500.s he does, hear that might be well thing, for them — d'ye Tom isn't now ? fit
2501. Sheridan to say to Mike she'd be taking, — he's a very though I have nothing
2502.g, — he's a very though I have nothing good lad in his own way." — "Bat he i
2503.aid the widow, become him to be anything not a else, for God knows he has no bad
2504. incorrigible Tim, "we'll say !" nothing. She's anything his — but Reilly a de
2505.m, "we'll say !" nothing. She's anything his — but Reilly a decent woman So sa
2506. — but Reilly a decent woman So saying he made door, escape through a neighbor
2507. made door, escape through a neighboring heartily. leaving poor Mrs. laughing Mr
2508. through a neighboring heartily. leaving poor Mrs. laughing Mrs. Flanagan had no
2509.ing heartily. leaving poor Mrs. laughing Mrs. Flanagan had not yet recovered her
2510.rfulness, but she could not help smiling. "Well ! just listen to what he says !
2511.e gathered her shawl around her anything he says. I'll be up to well to be offen
2512.ded at ; him one of these days, or going to vespers ?" all I'll lose a fall. Is
2513.fall. Is any of you Yes, they were going except Mrs. Flanagan, so Mrs. Reilly th
2514.ly shook her fist at him with a menacing air, but they walked off together as go
2515.nds as could be, John and Ellie bringing up the rear. Iu the evening when Mrs. R
2516.lie bringing up the rear. Iu the evening when Mrs. Reilly and Tom were seated at
2517.ddenly laid down the cup she was raising to her lips, and addressed her son who
2518." I wouldn't wish to tell " you anything else, mother. But what is it ?" " Did y
2519.tated. That is," said his mother, taking him up, "you didn't exactly go a courti
2520.im up, "you didn't exactly go a courting to Alice, but there was a sort of a lik
2521.or I can't deny that I once had a liking her And I suppose you have still," said
2522.efore now. That's ray thanks for staying as I am, and all on your account, Tom,
2523.e one who " Mother," said he, was making a desperate effort. "you do me wrong in
2524.ndeed, you do! I never thought of giving you a daughter-in-law upon my word, I d
2525. it how was it that people got a talking about V " I'll just tell heard somethin
2526.about V " I'll just tell heard something of not. you the plain it, though truth,
2527. didn't me to run the risk of disturbing that peace. let Let Alice be ever so go
2528.e notions V said his mother, endeavoring to conceal her emotion. " Quite — qui
2529. his mother's face, as herself. inviting her to examine for " Haven't I been doi
2530.er to examine for " Haven't I been doing all I could for Mike well Sheridan, tha
2531.t say so, mother," said '* Tom, blushing faintly. It took some time for her to k
2532. now she knows him, and is quite willing to marry him if the old people on both
2533.round." Mrs. out her Reilly said nothing. Her heart was full to overflowing, but
2534.thing. Her heart was full to overflowing, but she could not speak a word. She to
2535.nxious to prove that he had no lingering regret for the sacrifice he had his cha
2536.meal Was ended, and the tea-things being removed, the Bible Tom took op the Hist
2537.y of • loud. which he had been reading said his mother, a? u Just wait a minut
2538.D FLANAGANS. " I have just been thinking, she took a seat near him. iny son, tha
2539.h of me to try to keep you from marrying," " Why, no, mother, I wasn't selfish,
2540.the mother, " suptell pose I was to ling to back out, Mike when all — don't yo
2541.n't think of any such " I give you thing," cried Tom, with unusual warmth. my so
2542.pardon, my dear mother, for interrupting it is, you, but the short and the long
2543.ver wish to be in there's no use talking any more about May So you see I go ou ?
2544. I suppose so," said his mother, putting the " I see I must give in. lamp nearer
2545.ected on the other. his Tom said nothing, however, but quietly resume J his read
2546.owever, but quietly resume J his reading, u wondering how he had got over easily
2547.uietly resume J his reading, u wondering how he had got over easily. ei\V rrassm
2548.d well it to he might, for the recording angel life. marJei in lustrous characte
2549.pect of success although he said nothing of it to his mother, it was well known
2550.required and it his down to the blessing of God, for self-denial. good mother h&
2551.s ?*nd his wife reward That same evening, Tim Flanagan over, after tea, walked M
2552.im went it skillfully to work, beginning at a safe distance from his real object
2553. his real object, and gradually bringing into view. Dan was at first 350 B LAKES
2554.ery surly on and said if Tim had nothing better to do than praise up the Byrnes
2555.shows that Neddy Byrne is more forgiving than you, Dan, for he that says he has
2556.ter or a bet- anywhere within my knowing. I tell you what, Dan, even to say noth
2557. tell you what, Dan, even to say nothing of religion, which, you know, forbids u
2558.s I'd be sorry to hear of harm happening to him or his, but I Mike marry his dau
2559.and plain, there's no use in your saying you owe the Byrnes no ill-will. Now, it
2560.eased you ought to be to see Mike making such a pru* till MIES SHERIDAN'S MARRIA
2561.n't give Still all, for I have no liking for the Byrnes. aa you say Father Power
2562. of the and that Mike has taken a liking to her, I'll not be the means of keepin
2563.to her, I'll not be the means of keeping it back. You may tell Mike so when he c
2564. didn't come round without good pressing. I don't want him all to think of a sud
2565. last, how look take this but, venturing, to towards his father, he was speedily
2566.-assured, for honest in Dan was laughing His mother, his father, a quiet smiling
2567. His mother, his father, a quiet smiling, way peculiar to himself. too, was and
2568.o, continued laughir g. Mike, no shaking hands with me. Tim Flanagan says you're
2569.ith me. Tim Flanagan says you're holding out against your mother and me, and wnd
2570." Now for it, Mike I" said Tim, laughing. or do you not, consent to marry Alice
2571.e." " I consent *' !" said Mike, sitting down by his father, all and, I suppose,
2572.ve done for me this night." Next morning early, Dan Sheridan sent Annie to tell
2573.h together. " I suppose you're wondering at my going with you, side. Tim " ?." o
2574." I suppose you're wondering at my going with you, side. Tim " ?." observed Dan,
2575.y To tell you the truth, I was up seeing Father Power this morning, and he got a
2576. was up seeing Father Power this morning, and he got a talking to all me about c
2577.Power this morning, and he got a talking to all me about charity, and forgiving
2578.g to all me about charity, and forgiving our enemies, and felt such things, unti
2579.s know it very well," said Tim, laughing, " and when this I got your message I j
2580.when this I got your message I j morning I guessed he had been talking to you. w
2581. j morning I guessed he had been talking to you. was well pleased with you I las
2582.e on Neddy's invitation ; Alice blushing like a new-blown rose, and her mother s
2583.a new-blown rose, and her mother smiling most graciously. On the following eveni
2584.miling most graciously. On the following evening the all Flanagans, the Sheridan
2585.ost graciously. On the following evening the all Flanagans, the Sheridans, and t
2586. could ever suspect him of any lingering regret for what he was about to lose fo
2587.himself to such a saw, to her great ting with his relief, trial ; but, after a w
2588.after a while, she that Tom was laughing and chat- partner as gaily as though no
2589.chat- partner as gaily as though nothing lay beneath the sparkling surface. Edwa
2590.though nothing lay beneath the sparkling surface. Edward Flanagan and 354 BLARES
2591.'Callagan was there, was a happy meeting. week from that day, Mike Sheridan and
2592.er pair never received priestly blessing. A numerous party of their friends assi
2593. prayer went up to heaven for a blessing on the anion thus auspiciously formed.
2594.on thus auspiciously formed. The wedding was held at Dan Sheridan's by a special
2595.CAUSE MATTERS OF GENERAL IMPORT. Passing over an interval of ten years, we will
2596. curtain, and give our readers a parting look at the different personages who ha
2597.erent personages who have been " playing parts" before them. First in our affect
2598.st in our affections are the for nothing if Flanagan family, and we have written
2599.line of ;" his occasions. But, run- ning our eye along the " old familiar face o
2600.ued expression on every face, underlying the Christian resignation of those " wh
2601. inflammation of the lungs, such a thing. said, to It was their pride and their
2602. gratitude and respect to the father ing-place of who had done so much for them.
2603.a handsome fortune. There was a blessing on all that they possessed, and everyth
2604. all that they possessed, and everything they undertook seemed to prosper. John
2605. when our was just such another blooming story re-opens as her mother-in-law was
2606. and in her home her mother was spending the evening of her days calmly and happ
2607.home her mother was spending the evening of her days calmly and happily. Once in
2608. days, soon began to jar on the pleasing melancholy which had become habitual to
2609.ar, all the children came in the morning early to ask their grand mother's bless
2610.rly to ask their grand mother's blessing. Mrs. Flanagan's life was wearing away
2611.essing. Mrs. Flanagan's life was wearing away calmly and peacefully, in the mids
2612.e her beloved husband awaited her coming lie instantly checked herself, and said
2613.er for know my dear children ar« having me with them, and I am content to ! I r
2614.nto sunshine by city friends, the loving and beloved. Dr. Power himself went onc
2615.k ever after of certain events as having occurfirst or the time Dr. Power was it
2616.les Blake and his wife were still living, in but it would thin, be no easy matte
2617.ary the tall, who seemed already bending beneath ; and as for Miles, though he s
2618.seem to ? understand your way of talking. If you would only try to get over thos
2619.on you and company, too. but I'm getting old now, Eliza, and I hope wiser If I h
2620.ve saved you this and given up troubling you at trouble, but it's all, I'd never
2621.late to mend. till If there's any- thing wrong, you can send for me, but then yo
2622.le yourself, there's no necessity paying so much respect to old people like us.
2623.ays, that the children can learn nothing good from Eliza followed her mother to
2624.followed her mother to the door, begging her not and expressing her sorrow for t
2625.the door, begging her not and expressing her sorrow for the misunderstanding tha
2626.sing her sorrow for the misunderstanding that had arisen. "Nonsense, girl, nonse
2627.l, nonsense," said the old woman, losing " go and mind your business, if patienc
2628.e the way of it," Thomson, left; walking with a dignified " if air into the parl
2629.he way, mother, of course I have nothing say. more to Good morning." Mrs. Blake
2630.I have nothing say. more to Good morning." Mrs. Blake called at Mrs. Fitzgerald'
2631.her sister-in-law, sooth- " don't crying sometimes eases one's heart. "Oh! the o
2632.was possible. Eliza's just after telling me her. not to go into her parlor when
2633.r Mrs. Flanagan nor her daughter knowing well what to say at the moment. Suddenl
2634. would ever eh, think of Eliza's turning out so girl Nelly — did you ever hear
2635."Weill know," said Mrs. Flanagan, taking ; ner spectacles to wipe them Reen miic
2636.u the truth, when she was a g\rl growing up, I thought her a good, obedient daug
2637.ates soot. And so she's the time harping, harping at the chilcalls the true reli
2638.. And so she's the time harping, harping at the chilcalls the true religion, so
2639. then, that he It's mean3 queer to bring his children up Catholics. the Catholic
2640.d a sorrowful heart But 1 was forgetting to ask you, won't you Miles told me it'
2641.d me it's to come over to-morrow evening 1 ask you, and you know we're so lone I
2642.is that a real charity to come. breaking down He's that's it far from being the
2643.aking down He's that's it far from being the man ! he used to be. And, sure no w
2644.or him. too late. Conscience is stinging 9 him now when it's " But won't you com
2645." But won't you come V to-morrow evening, Mary," said Mrs. Flanagan, Not struggl
2646.ary," said Mrs. Flanagan, Not struggling with who seemed some strong emotion. Sh
2647.You must not expect us to-morrow evening, my dear aunt," said she ; " I'm sure y
2648.," said her aunt Ellie, with a faltering voice. it Oh! then sure enough it ? " ;
2649.isturb you any more I with my clattering for know the you'll be better pleased l
2650.ree wept some time it you was the loving and then go to church in the was settle
2651.s settled that Mrs. Blake should morning with the Flanagan family, mass said by
2652. Henry would go to mass the next morning, he only knew what it if was for. " As
2653. to let him know." So she went something out of her way in order to leave word f
2654.it." for except you do not hear anything of "Oh! " but I entirely never fear, ma
2655.ch." " How is your mistress this morning, and the chil- dren r well, " All ma'am
2656.y ; 8 " I have no time for like visiting. Just ratch your opportunity, master a
2657. Henry Blake went out stairs, the dining-room for something she wanted up leavin
2658.ut stairs, the dining-room for something she wanted up leaving Henry Toby, in th
2659.room for something she wanted up leaving Henry Toby, in the venerable what is vu
2660.en she came back, she found him laughing." " " What are you laughing conceit for
2661.him laughing." " " What are you laughing conceit for at, Henry ?" inquired Jane
2662.bright your next address to the laughing " I gentlemen of the jury." Not exactly
2663.e," said Henry, girl still ; am laughing at that Irish you have in the kitchen-
2664.r called this " Well, and then " morning at the door and told Kitty to tell me t
2665.ell me to be in Church to-morrow morning, bright and early, to hear Father Flana
2666.anagan sayHa ha ha ain't that rich ? ing mass for his father. then, ! ! ! And my
2667.the greatest set of to humbugs belonging dear, me !" Jane laughed you expect it
2668. a Not I, indeed I have no idea of going: to church week morning, and spending a
2669.no idea of going: to church week morning, and spending an hour or two there ! wh
2670.ng: to church week morning, and spending an hour or two there ! which I might tu
2671.s on your uncle's soul perhaps suffering in you know the poor dear man purgatory
2672.now the poor dear man purgatory, waiting for the mass. How would you like to be
2673.tory, *.dd I never want to hear anything about it, for such fwolish reli- doctri
2674.lish reli- doctrines are just what bring odium and disgrace on gion. If it were
2675.purgatory and penance, and like, praying to saints, and such sneered at as they
2676.ll rational Are we for Park this rvening ?" bill ?" Oh ! of course — what's on
2677.step into Zach's office as they're going." 866 B L A K E S AND FLANAGANS. ; " El
2678. that will hardly prevent bet from going. It would be a very bad cold indeed tha
2679.e fellow, so delighted the other evening when we took him King Lear. He just beg
2680. the other evening when we took him King Lear. He just begins to take proper not
2681.Samuel will be old enough to go, Evening came, and Henry and Jane zer for the th
2682.ry and Jane zer for the theatre, calling on the set off with Ebene- way to take
2683. better, Eliza said, but worse, anything. ! Why did she venture out, then, Jane
2684. nervous sit that she did hate to moping at home when Zachary girl of nine or te
2685.her large, bright eyes were ever roaming around, canvassing for admiration, and
2686.yes were ever roaming around, canvassing for admiration, and no matter how grave
2687.Selina was never at a loss for something to say. that she was for there It was h
2688.races put on by little 361 very charming, notwithstanding the load of frippery a
2689.ittle 361 very charming, notwithstanding the load of frippery airs art. On their
2690.- formed. Her tone was quite patronizing, as she initiated her attentive listene
2691.as a horrid old nun," said she, speaking of one "and you know, Ebenczer, nuns ar
2692. ! like the ; nun your ma -was reading about the other evening but only think,
2693. ma -was reading about the other evening but only think, Ebby, the part wasn't w
2694., the part wasn't well Ebenezer, opening his done I" " Whai did you say ?" asked
2695. keep her pany. Nurse consented, nothing loath, and away Kitty with her prize to
2696.s always well when he went of an evening to the kitchen, for he was Kitty's prim
2697. you me ?" The answer was slow in coming, for Sam's mouth was full at the moment
2698.l- and turned his attention to something This, however, was a fair specimen of h
2699.t this time, there came a decent looking " the emigrant into Flanagan's store, a
2700.e emigrant into Flanagan's store, asking to see " mas- Oh ! you mean the boss,"
2701.ean the boss," said the shopman, smiling bosses here ; " we have two I'll tell b
2702. I do for you ?" 1" said the man, taking off his hat. 1 was directed here to get
2703. it true, sir, that you know it anything about It is, my my power my poor sister
2704.o tell " I only wish was in you anything satisfactory Youf lister is dead —
2705.ghters, who are, I believe, still living." " Ah This was a ray of hope. then, th
2706.e. give wife, — And where are anything them, and — be ever glad to see sir,
2707. is, I am told, a lazy, good-for-nothing fellow, to say the least of him, and th
2708.an's wife you must excuse me from saying anything you might, possibly, do someth
2709. you must excuse me from saying anything you might, possibly, do something ; to
2710.ything you might, possibly, do something ; to reclaim, at some future time but,
2711.ort sketch of the family history, ending as follows " : Poor Mrs. Dillon was a v
2712.rrors they had committed in the bringing up of their children. Your sister ended
2713.RAL IMPORT you her will 371 last resting-place, and that of her husband. You hav
2714. husband. You have no trouble in finding it out," he added, with a smile, which
2715.an. in high spirits to his wife, telling her he was sure in he had got with a re
2716.enth street, where, after some searching, In your ckarity, pray for Dillon. they
2717.ad-board iu the form of a cross, bearing the simple inscription the souls : of J
2718.now, didn't I tell we had God's blessing to get in with See what a fine haudsome
2719.er poor John and Betsy. prayer, kneeling by the tou, Nancy, that God for all his
2720.ho gave it. His whole fortune, amounting to thirty thousand dollars, came into t
2721.ON. Daniel Sheridan and Jenny were going, still 873 the same easy to assist good
2722.st good-hearted couple, able and willing the needy, never beloved by of all maki
2723.he needy, never beloved by of all making any show, yet respected and who knew th
2724.st glimpse we had them they were jogging merrily along, on the road of in a comf
2725.by and Joan sort of way, the one helping and supporting the other through the va
2726.t of way, the one helping and supporting the other through the various sloughs a
2727.s, but more often by themselves, leaving some of the others to take charge of th
2728.olitary they lived together, surchilling rounded by cold and splendor, which had
2729.to confession, but, somehow, its healing balm gave little peace to her mind. She
2730.o fits of querulous impatience, ; during which she made every one around her i m
2731. truth was, that conscience was. lashing both husband ; and wife tion, the fttio
2732.ons, Miles returned home with a lowering brow and a feverish flush his cheek. We
2733.ou get on ? " and if " his wife, meeting him at the door, " how at Was Henry hom
2734.y, with my consent. where they are going head- Why, what has happened to make yo
2735.ou so angry ?" ''It's not worth speaking of," said Miles, still "for it's only w
2736. unnatural young cubs one of them saying If it's my old Irish grandpa that's you
2737.t as red as a coal, but she said nothing, and neither did I. Out I walked, and i
2738.eshold again. Those children are growing up in a bad way, mind I tell ; : ' —
2739.or Eliza has any religion worth speaking of, nor Henry either, and as for Jane,
2740.ane, Iver religion isn't worth as having, though she has enough of it to make he
2741. could wish. they always fathers getting Good all obedient children were, and no
2742. what Mary, don't you be his are ringing casting up to me ! — don't now,, or y
2743.ry, don't you be his are ringing casting up to me ! — don't now,, or you'll no
2744.Those hateful prophecies of from morning night, my ears like a death-bell, and y
2745.ike a death-bell, and you must be coming over them to make matters worse." This
2746. in by the follower, servant, who, being an old was anxiouh to restore peace. As
2747.wer, He was unable t£en rapidly nearing the fatal bourn. to leave his own house
2748.have Miles and Mary go there one morning under divers became more frequent Flana
2749.317 energy that remained to him to bring both parties to a more Christian frame
2750.nd. He at length succeeded in convincing them that it was now more than ever the
2751.the hardships of of as a means expiating their sins. Their reconciliation acquir
2752. will of God, and died as he to awaiting without lived in close fear, the final
2753. soothed the sorrows of their struggling state with Thank his mild eloquence and
2754.where the School ques- — — was being agitated, and through his thrice blesse
2755. the Christian education of youth, doing for boys what the Ladies of the Sacred
2756.ster, these Catholic institutions rising and flourishing around them, but no chi
2757.olic institutions rising and flourishing around them, but no child of theirs eve
2758. it without religion of any kind, saving a sort of predilec- tion in favor of th
2759.ity, and a great contempt for everything Irish it is, ; therefore, quite probabl
2760.front ranks of the Know-Nothings, urging on the godless fanaticism of the age, r
2761. A intellect, a noble nature, were going rapidly to want of the pruning hand, an
2762.ere going rapidly to want of the pruning hand, and the salutary The mocking demo
2763.uning hand, and the salutary The mocking demon of doubt and restraint of religio
2764.ligion. incredulity was gradually taking possession of that soul whence faith ha
2765.pelled. Henry T. Blake was fast becoming a scoffer a declaimer against all relir
2766.ten to any suggestions lis- recommending a change. Mauy a time he was besieged w
2767.e he was besieged with all the reasoning and vituperative powers of Tomkins, Pea
2768.mpany, but he had still a way of getting out, and generally contrived to to evad
2769.omkins, Milmore and Jane were belaboring Catholicity with to all their might, an
2770.with to all their might, and endeavoring to persuade Henry "come forth from Baby
2771.€ 880 SLAKES AND FLANAGANS. me ? going to make a Protestant of If you do, I ce
2772.y the hypocrite, so the notion of making As for me, I you may give up I give me
2773. spare yourselves the trouble of angling for me. Believe me, you have no bait th
2774.; hope that your excellent understanding was awakis ened to the saving knowledge
2775.erstanding was awakis ened to the saving knowledge of the truth which in" " Don'
2776.pray you," hope so. said Henrv, laughing ; " you and I understand each other, Mr
2777.ad Catholic, a Protestant." I am willing to own, but, I shall never be The two m
2778.say the truth, each had been calculating on Henry as a convert for some time pas
2779. the inner reverend propagandist. Having paid tbeir respects to the excellent lu
2780.ous belief. cious host of their pressing desire, they said, to secure his eterna
2781.thanks, gentlemen," said Henry, laughing, "for your kind anxiety about to tell y
2782.fare ; but, allow now that I am speaking plainly, that, when my salvation in dan
2783.ay so. To him religion wore the lowering aspect of a stern monitor, a severe mis
2784.er nay, st r l worse. Although believing in her heart, like Henry, that all othe
2785. in her married life, she left off going to confession, simply because Zachary t
2786.she would cut her short with ase talking, : " there's ik ma ! I cannot, and will
2787.KES AND FLANAGANS. the Thomsons laughing at me it such fun of me about confessio
2788.el for the downright miserable. of going must only wait chance unknown to any of
2789. me so vv?ry short." " There's no saying, Eliza," said her mother, gravely " I ;
2790.I ; was too long of your way of thinking myself, but, thanks to God and Father P
2791.h. There'? — : ! no use in your taking on is so, for I have already told you,
2792." Why, of course, ma ! 1 intend to bring the girls up Catholics, but Zachary ins
2793.Catholics, but Zachary insists on having the boys himself. go with Indeed, I'm a
2794. there N. satisfied 883 ; far from being but, as Eliza give in for no use in tal
2795., as Eliza give in for no use in talking, so she had to that time, though the da
2796.to that time, though the dark foreboding still lay really was heavy on her heart
2797.parations for the grand eveut were going on rapidly, and no hopes cloud seemed t
2798. darkened all at once, and the lightning flashed, and the thunderbolt fell with
2799.er was found to be danger, and the thing the mother did was to send off for the
2800.The two were out on sick-calls in saying it opposite directions. bo, After the l
2801.efore the entrance of the nay, shrieking, for " a priest priest, crying out, —
2802.shrieking, for " a priest priest, crying out, —a priest I" —but no priest ca
2803.y myself I didn't I confess. do anything good can prayers do was able. I didn't
2804.air. and overshadowed with the dark wing Her features, hitherto so fair and so s
2805.a few months after her daughter, leaving Miles lonelier and sadder than ever. Be
2806.s lonelier and sadder than ever. Bending beneath the load of grief and remorse,
2807.ould never hear say, " of any such thing. " I Let them have him," she would to l
2808.Mrs. Henry was determined. father coming in contact with her children, fearing l
2809.ng in contact with her children, fearing lest they might begin to backslide unde
2810.l vague idea of Catholicity, and knowing nothing at about Jesuits, or what they
2811.idea of Catholicity, and knowing nothing at about Jesuits, or what they really w
2812.ey really were, she was habit of setting in the all good Catholics down as Jesui
2813.r life to keep her husband from becoming Jesuitical. As for her children, she wa
2814. actually went Mass four Sundays running, and was once in at the OW 886 fiteor R
2815. FLANAGANS. He even had an idea of going to confession, and go as far as the Oim
2816.moment, and asked him where he wag going was he going to Church ? The satirical
2817.sked him where he wag going was he going to Church ? The satirical smile did rea
2818.r poor friend. He said he was just going in to look at a certain painting lately
2819.t going in to look at a certain painting lately placed in that Church, and invit
2820.im to have a mint-julep at a neighboring saloon. turning-point in That was the h
2821.t-julep at a neighboring saloon. turning-point in That was the his guardian- Hen
2822.tion dreamy sort of way with the closing scene drama. Meanwhile, Henry Blake's s
2823.athies are in all with confession-hating people. He folly of will descant eloque
2824.eloquent terms on the antiquated praying for the dead, making use of holy water,
2825. antiquated praying for the dead, making use of holy water, venerating relics, a
2826.ad, making use of holy water, venerating relics, and other such Catholic practic
2827.mers were certainly right in endeavoring to prune the old tree from strous excre
2828.articularly severe on the Pope, " having or holding " any temporal sensible powe
2829. severe on the Pope, " having or holding " any temporal sensible power, and he w
2830.tholic. to make any man ashamed of being The States of the Church were always a
2831.counts we heard of Henry, he was holding a CONCLUSION. Brfcfidential 881 corresp
2832. 881 correspondence with Mazzini, taking care, at to publish a fact so honorable
2833.n short, the Pope was a tyrant belonging. of all tyrants, a religious tyrant —
2834.bad enough, Napoleon the Third something worse, the Russian Autocrat worse still
2835. Tom Reilly and his mother. The blessing of God was in them and on them, and yea
2836. gave to them he gave in secret, knowing that our heavenly Tom was in no way ost
2837.nder, then, that down as hard and saving. But there was no which institution of
2838.It w«u cheerful at times by his pitying kindness. BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. his pri
2839.y summer he first, insisted on her going for some weeks to Staten Island, or Roc
2840.and, or Rockaway, or some other watering-place. her compliance, to At Mrs. Reill
2841.ce, to At Mrs. Reilly was very unwilling to go without her son, but in order to
2842.h Mrs. Flanagan, and to the housekeeping department, she would go down that gene
2843.o marry again, and his second wife being a Protestant, of some advanced sect, po
2844.rianism. mother professed, though, being rather a strong-minded woman, she consi
2845. their supposed delinquency, and cunning always went together. The Flanagans use
2846. however, he make a compromise, dividing one-half of his money between the child
2847.children of Henry and Eliza, and leaving the other half for distribution amongst
2848. will on any account, for fear of giving scandal to those who would be but too w
2849.oided all exaggeration or undue coloring in this simple tale. I have merely stru
2850.of such incidents as we it see occurring every day in the world around us, growi
2851.very day in the world around us, growing out of the effects of good or bad educa
2852. the Church in America, altogether owing to the unaccountable folly of the paren
2853.ly of the parents themselves in exposing their children to perish. parents Catho
2854.eeble, that it is no longer worth having. The faith of a young man or a if young
2855., brought up under un- Catholic training, c o n c i. LSioy, StI to file more the
2856.ost part, its development has been owing to the emigration of Catholics from for
2857.easures to imbue the minds of the rising generation of Catholics with sound reli
2858.nciples. This can only be done by giving them a good Catholic education. In our
2859. be returned at 8 A. M. the next morning. Failure to return a Reserve book on ti

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: https://concordances.library.nd.edu/app/