Concordance for An adventure with the Apaches / by Gabriel Ferry [pseud.]

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1.    Internet Arcliive in 2007 witli funding from IVIicrosoft Corporation http://www
2. . CHAPTER Discovered! 31 CHAPTER Running the Gauntlet IV. 51 V. CHAPTER The Stra
3. he Prairie. river in the midst of rising from the to which was the island retrea
4. us growth of osiers or other interlacing shoots. But nearly opposite the large i
5. inst still this obstacle, some retaining their branches and foliage, others long
6. g since withered, and the interlock- ing of their roots had at length formed a s
7. a sort of solid ground on this floating island.. all Marine plants had sprung u
8. he Prairie. " Look,"' he added, pointing at the sleeping Fabian, " how the poor
9. ok,"' he added, pointing at the sleeping Fabian, " how the poor fellow has chang
10. ake to make him life. prefer a wandering to a sedentary it Was not to bestir him
11. ll peopled." "Do not Jest; I am speaking seriously," returned the Canadian. " I
12. shall make him love this en- A chanting Scene on the Prairie. fatigues 13 life
13. ! silent and solemn here," is everything around us Look and he pointed to the sl
14. d us Look and he pointed to the sleeping youth, " how the child slumbers, softly
15. the murmur isle, of the stream caressing this little stirring the branches of an
16. he stream caressing this little stirring the branches of and the breeze the will
17. enough, and habit had rendered a roving secret charm. life to him also full of
18. river bank a troop of wild horses coming to drink before returning for the night
19. horses coming to drink before returning for the night to their distant feeding-
20. g for the night to their distant feeding-grounds. See how they come up God in al
21. animals, with wide pink I their glowing eye», their nostrils, their floating m
22. ng eye», their nostrils, their floating manes. Ah ! have a notion to waken Fabi
23. e dreams one has at his ago, are showing him more graceful apparitions than dese
24. ind," continued the Canadian, struggling against his judgment. still " Now the b
25. Look at those streams of water escaping from his mouth; does not the sun make t
26. this fine animal, his dreams are showing him crowded edifices." streets and stat
27. greater in one of our royal parks. thing in its own time. Redwood; maturity love
28. eality. illusion It was still struggling gall was the drop of which God ness; di
29. ly and fell into a sad reverie, glancing from time to time at the sleeping Fabia
30. ancing from time to time at the sleeping Fabian, while Pepe was putting on again
31. sleeping Fabian, while Pepe was putting on again his buffalo-skin boots. Sudden
32. I tell you? Do you not hear that howling, I ought that barking, in the distance,
33. hear that howling, I ought that barking, in the distance, to say for wolves lik
34. wolves like when dogs? they are hunting give tongue as Poor stag! you say, he i
35. Spaniard, " he will seldom see anything like that." " The fact like it is he wi
36. ct like it is he will never see anything in any city," exclaimed the enchanted 1
37. ently shook the young man, after warning him by too suddenly. voice, so as not t
38. neck inflated, to inhale air head lying back in order through its more freely n
39. lack, galloped like bullets ricochetting him on a plain. The stag had an immense
40. endand there on the savanna and piercing eye of a ing with the horizon, the acti
41. on the savanna and piercing eye of a ing with the horizon, the acting as hunter
42. ye of a ing with the horizon, the acting as hunter could discover other wolves s
43. iscover other wolves sentinels, watching the to efforts of their com- panions dr
44. to run in their direction. On ar- riving at a certain distance from the sentinel
45. circle of enemies constantly contracting around him, and he stopped to recover a
46. urned upon the wolves who were driv- ing him toward the ambush, and made a last
47. group of across But he could not spring mass into the compact which fell they i
48. a wolf Pursuers and Pursued. 21 clawing on his legs, his flanks bleeding, his t
49. clawing on his legs, his flanks bleeding, his tongue hanging out of his mouth, t
50. his flanks bleeding, his tongue hanging out of his mouth, the poor animal advan
51. is magnificent!" cried Fabian, clapping his hands, and beside himself with that
52. ed. enemy/' interrupted Fabian to spring into the river." ; " he is going The wa
53. spring into the river." ; " he is going The water leaped and boiled under the i
54. er leaped and boiled under the it spring of the stag; after him, boiled leaped a
55. wolves in furious pursuit, eyes bleeding, howling with hunger and desire, while
56. furious pursuit, eyes bleeding, howling with hunger and desire, while others, l
57. ran madly along the river bank, yelping dolefully as they went. The stag- was w
58. ! behind the bushes," said lie, setting the example ; also." " the Indians are
59. epe had watched while they were drinking, were galloping madly on the plain. Som
60. while they were drinking, were galloping madly on the plain. Some Indian horseme
61. greater freedom of action, were bounding after the frightened animals. first At
62. armed \fith spears, others were whirling their lassos of braided leather, and al
63. of braided leather, and all were yelling in the fashion by which they express ei
64. joy or anger. Pepe turned a questioning glance on the Canadian, as if to inquir
65. this world. as There is Eedwood growing weak as a woman." Pursuers and Pursued.
66. riders con- tinued to pursue the flying horses. The numberless obstacles encoun
67. s, could not stop them. Without deigning to slacken their speed or go around the
68. atched with en- thusiasm the astonishing agility of these intrepid horsemen; but
69. uers and Pursued. a part of the imposing and terrible spectacle of a chase of wh
70. n. The stag, at bay and forced to flying like the go ashore again, was still win
71. ed by their efforts, pursued him howling. The wild horses galloped ahead of the
72. those of the ravenous beasts, describing wide circles in order to er-cape the la
73. aches. At sight of Fabian, whose glowing eyes all were following these tumultuou
74. n, whose glowing eyes all were following these tumultuous man- oeuvers witliout
75. tumultuous man- oeuvers witliout seeming to dn!ad the dangers which ho wns bravi
76. o dn!ad the dangers which ho wns braving for the first time, Pursuers and Pursue
77. and sound out of perils more threatening than the unlikely one of being discover
78. reatening than the unlikely one of being discovered. "Ah !" he began, " these ar
79. in spite of him, and he ceased speaking; for he felt that he his life if would
80. increased his anguish. Without changing its aspect the scene be- came more sole
81. g, had vanished in the tant fog. Nothing remained but the score of Indian hunter
82. quickly turned horse toward the opening bordered by trees, which was opposite t
83. ry." Fabian yielded this final reasoning. fleeing Meanwhile the white horseman w
84. an yielded this final reasoning. fleeing Meanwhile the white horseman was like a
85. of his steed. He came toward the opening in the trees opposite the floating isla
86. ening in the trees opposite the floating island. The hiding men could see the ag
87. opposite the floating island. The hiding men could see the agonized expression o
88. ry one of them he is considerinflict ing what sort of torture will upon him. whi
89. oop of the wild horses they were chasing." The Indians, remaining on their horse
90. ey were chasing." The Indians, remaining on their horses, surrounded the prisone
91. s, surrounded the prisoner, who, casting a desperate glance around him, saw noth
92. desperate glance around him, saw nothing but bronze faces and muscles in repose.
93. matter demanded attention. Throwre- ing the bridle to one of the band, who Disc
94. e straight islet. toward the On reaching the bank he seemed to be looking for tr
95. eaching the bank he seemed to be looking for traces on the sand. Eedwood's heart
96. ch in his country answers for everything. But the sand, trodden a thousand times
97. the wild horses which had been drinking at the river, betrayed no traces to the
98. went farther up stream, still searching. " The demon has some suspicion," said
99. en we entered this islet. I kept telling you, Pepe," con- tinued the Canadian, w
100. ther but neither you Fabian were willing, and, like a fool, I way to your advice
101. omach in any ordinary human body. During this time the deliberation over the fat
102. dians, and made a brief reply, motioning his warriors to wait for him; then, wit
103. advanced to the bank of the after having given a short order to riders, it. of h
104. apparent calm. The chief made a speaking-trumpet of his hand, and shouted in a l
105. m the eye of an Apache, the salmon going up the cataracts may not leave a fur- r
106. y a goose would betray himself by trying to sing." The Indian listened once more
107. e would betray himself by trying to sing." The Indian listened once more; but th
108. edis- sumed Black Bird, without becoming couraged, " are only three/'' and he em
109. Bird they will come out of their hiding-place," continued the chief, Apache " a
110. d the chief, Apache " and they are going to learn them the white men of the Nort
111. on, also understood that they were being offered an alliance which their conscie
112. ightnings of the scornful eyes, swelling of their trio nostrils proved that the
113. o the Redwood, carried away by and using a metaphor proper tongue; Indian "he mi
114. ge, its it an Indian its plumpness going to or its meagerness, the place it is a
115. slet Behind is the reeds of the floating there a man as strong as a bison, talle
116. elf-love seemed wounded. "I am " waiting for the answer of the whites," went on
117. Bird, tened. I and he lis- hear nothing," he resumed, " but the river which say
118. is at last!" said Pepe; "the is speaking his real language; he not very squeamis
119. nguage; he not very squeamish in seeking allies like us." " Ah !" " if exclaimed
120. es a terrible enemy." " We say something like that at home," added Pepe, in an u
121. a bullet into the space tall separating those two plants yonder?" But the priso
122. a reconciled friend." Discovered! 43 ing but the little Spanish mingled with the
123. n dialect, and he remained and trembling. Thereupon Black Bird said a few words
124. , priso- and then he succeeded in making the ner understand by means of gestures
125. an has no other speak, means I of making us until to- not a word will say morrow
126. om the badly handled into sank whistling the water a few inches away from the 44
127. ssos of your warriors." As he was ending the five riders this consoling reflecti
128. as ending the five riders this consoling reflection, who had been sent away by t
129. n by the wind," said the Indian, lifting the rifle and islet, holding its barrel
130. an, lifting the rifle and islet, holding its barrel turned toward the motionless
131. his vigorous hands. " But before firing," he went on, " the Indian will await a
132. let a double chance." Without disturbing a single green fringe islet, osier of t
133. ou." The Indian chief, the rifle resting on his hand, listened while counting; b
134. ing on his hand, listened while counting; but, with the exception of the water,
135. th the exception of the water, murmuring as it bent the reeds at his feet and th
136. owheads flew into the air; but, kneeling one behind the other, the three hunters
137. an ever he was. let The tempter is going to us alone for a while, until he has g
138. t in favor of make some who is expecting a frightful death?" Redwood in his turn
139. hatever you say I will without blenching; it whatever you may do, I will do is a
140. do, I will do is also without trembling." " Fabian speaking truth, Pepe/' cried
141. so without trembling." " Fabian speaking truth, Pepe/' cried the Canadian. " See
142. asped Fabian in his arms; sumed speaking with " Three position a certain solemni
143. irst see what those red devils are going to do with their prisoner." CHAPTEE IV.
144. ith their prisoner." CHAPTEE IV. RUNNING THE GAUNTLET. While him this dialogue w
145. NTLET. While him this dialogue was going on, the In- dians had led the captive,
146. ians had led the captive, though leaving free use of his limbs. They had formed
147. f tormentors. "I see what they are going as if I to do," said Eedwood, "as well
148. e, and, at a given signal, 51 52 Running the Gauntlet. he will make his spring f
149. ng the Gauntlet. he will make his spring forward. Then the Indians will run afte
150. e newcomers joined these While clutching his with violence, Fabian looked with p
151. tunate white man, who, with hag- Running the Gauntlet. gard eyes and features co
152. nvulsed with 53 terror, sig- was waiting in horrible anguish for the nal to be g
153. s well as on the plain all were watching for this moment with deep anxiety, when
154. o dethis frightto an instant the opening of It ful chase. was a gesture easy com
155. mouth. laid his hand upon the 54 Running the Ckiuntlet. " Be quiet," said he ; "
156. quiet," said he ; " do not, by betraying yourself too soon, deprive life that po
157. this signal could be compared to nothing but the roaring of a pack of jaguars fo
158. d be compared to nothing but the roaring of a pack of jaguars following a herd o
159. e roaring of a pack of jaguars following a herd of deer. The unhappy captive see
160. ssed safely a part of the distance lying between him and the river. But tb< Runn
161. tween him and the river. But tb< Running the Gauntlet. stones, 55 which wounded
162. rm of the victim, and the Indian, losing balance by the force of his misthrust,
163. ck- the white man seemed to hesitate ing up the lance dropped by the Indian in h
164. red over the head of the vie- 56 Running the Gauntlet. tim, who, in his turn, fe
165. The Canadian was on the point of firing; nothing but the fear of killing him wh
166. dian was on the point of firing; nothing but the fear of killing him whom he wis
167. firing; nothing but the fear of killing him whom he wished to defend arrested h
168. the hunter's bullet his was brandishing in hand the bloody scalp of the wretche
169. is corpse v/as seen to rise all bleeding, his skull laid bare, move a step Runni
170. his skull laid bare, move a step Running or the Gauntlet. 57 two forward, and th
171. is ear. " Is not the poor fellow calling for assist- ance?" said he. And for the
172. of their formidable Northern 58 Running the Gaxmtiet. all fell enemies, and the
173. sistance in a feeble voice his trembling hands. and stretched out The Indian who
174. igantic figure to its full " File firing now, against those hounds," said he, "
175. y must not take you alive." While saying these words Redwood lutely reso- entere
176. fle held the enemies respectful. Running the Gauntlet. 59 "Don't fire until I ha
177. leave to me to prevent him from annoying you." The Spaniard kept their his brill
178. who maintained their tance, threatening each of the Apaches in ready to turn wi
179. till Meanwhile the Canadian was mov- ing forward, the water gradually growing sh
180. ing forward, the water gradually growing shallower around hira, when an Indian r
181. d fell himself upon his face. 60 Running the Oauntlet. " Your turn, Fabian/' sai
182. Your turn, Fabian/' said Pepe, throwing himself down on his back, American fash
183. n at whom he had fired, it did not bring him down. Sev- eral arrows flew circlin
184. him down. Sev- eral arrows flew circling around the Canacoolness, dian, but Redw
185. leave his de- The poor wretch, clinging had the presence of mind liverer's arms
186. ms at liberty, and the Canadian, Running the Gauntlet. 61 laden with his burden,
187. he sand of the islet the almost fainting man. " There are three of them out of t
188. ere are three of them out of the running," said the giant. truce of several minu
189. ile shall have a Well, Fabian, do firing? you see the advantage of The rascals h
190. This is hour. not bad for your beginning, and I can assure you that when you hav
191. rget his gloomy thoughts, and addressing himself 62 Running the Gauntlet. to the
192. ughts, and addressing himself 62 Running the Gauntlet. to the scalped fully, man
193. the scalped fully, man, who was groaning dole- he said: arrived too late to save
194. joys very good it health notwithstanding; saves a lot of is all. is time in comb
195. aves a lot of is all. is time in combing one's hair, and that Your life is safe
196. the moment, and that the essential thing, try to keep it and now we are going to
197. ing, try to keep it and now we are going to so." Some poor skull rags torn from
198. e poor skull rags torn from the clothing of the man a served to keep in position
199. M^ater. and This moistened with dressing concealed the hideous wound. Afterwards
200. ee," said the Canadian, who con- Running the Gauntlet. 63 stantly cherished the
201. 63 stantly cherished the idea of keeping Fabian with him, " it is necessary that
202. obility, the aspens murmured the evening breeze disturbed them, and beneath the
203. disturbed them, and beneath the sinking sun the waters of the river be- gan to
204. an immense sheet of sand, where nothing broke the silence and the solitude. ''W
205. in a tone of artless triumph. 64 Running the Gauntlet. "If Pepe, " it; there are
206. e bullet or arrow proof than this moving fringe of reeds and count how leaves. D
207. epe. I do not mistake," answered Running the Gauntlet. 65 " Then there are ten o
208. , neither to right or left, in following the current. All the we have to look ou
209. ed like by enorfrise mous roots standing up chevaux de ; or the stakes of an int
210. bably be renewed was defended by nothing but a thick screen of rushes and young
211. he current of the stream some 66 Running the Gauntlet. large dry branches and so
212. his hands with sat- isfaction at having erected a sufficient barrier between Fa
213. Pepe; "one would have from its was going to tear itself foundations to follow th
214. ger felt that the moment was approaching, and that the truce was about to be fol
215. ggle. The Canadian advised to be sparing of their his two companions ; ammunitio
216. ve Fabian some instructions about taking a 67 68 The Stratagem. he gave the Span
217. e Spaniard's hand a truer aim; trembling clasp, who silently returned to it, and
218. tribute once the three de- human feeling, fenders of the island returned each to
219. surpassed. Some minutes elapsed, during which the labored breathing of the woun
220. psed, during which the labored breathing of the wounded man and the rippling of
221. hing of the wounded man and the rippling of the water against the raft which blo
222. nks themselves and their rushes, nothing escaped the attentive scrutiny of the h
223. t when night was quickly bushes. falling with its train of am- The Stratagem. "T
224. thought ex- pressed aloud than a warning to watchful. them to be Meanwhile the s
225. pe by the uncertain glimtwilight. mering of The green dark tones ters, ; of the
226. d the Spaniard, eyes and the as piercing as those of the Indians, vigilance they
227. , vigilance they exerted allowed nothing to escape their trained senses. 70 The
228. ked the Canadian, " do you see something else?" " I perceive," said Fabian, " be
229. ians have employed their time in cutting those branches and of making portable s
230. in cutting those branches and of making portable shelters them ; but, to tell t
231. to Fabian," Pepe. went on the addressing " It will be an easy target for part, f
232. branches where the leaves are beginning to droop. The Indian at is be- hind the
233. d bush sank down, but not without giving the two hunters a glimpse of a red body
234. hunters a glimpse of a red body writhing behind the leaves, and the osiers added
235. Indians taken ears. by surprise reaching their " Unless I mistake, there are onl
236. see the leaves of it is an aspen shaking over yonder, and certainly not the wind
237. it is one of those rascals who climbing or has climbed to the top." Just then a
238. the of the branches. Fabian was watching him '' attentively. If I had a white so
239. t my vest, for the soldier that; dealing with an Indian I would put it, myself b
240. f the cap and vest, but without touching either the Ca- nadian or his companions
241. of wood the ground, Fabian, we are going to have an enemy the less." fired at Th
242. nal and the explosion was still rumbling when an Indian tumbled from like branch
243. d by the 76 The Stratagem. peated firing, momentarily emerged from his stupor to
244. from his stupor to mutter in a trembling voice: " Virgin of the Seven Sorrows !
245. not sound like a band of tigers roaring in the shadows? Holy Virgin! have pity
246. like succession, but not you by whooping in an old woodsman. Did you never hoar
247. never hoar jackals in the forest roaring and replying a to one another as if the
248. ckals in the forest roaring and replying a to one another as if there were hundr
249. own like this," said he " the only thing to keep your eyes it on the summit of t
250. r scalps, and they will decide on coming to us." This resolve of the hunter seem
251. en 78 7*716 Stratagem. earlier; standing a tiles, moment been but the projechori
252. been but the projechorizontally, having not launched them. his cap could reach
253. s " Is not that one of the dogs climbing up the willow again?" asked Pepe. "Yes;
254. let us stand his if fire without budging any more than It is a chance to run. te
255. ned anxiety all motionless, but watching with the manoeuvers of the Indian. hois
256. d a view of the interior of the floating island. There was still light enough to
257. hidden last the who was not comAttaining at by the foliage. height desired, the
258. eye, like that of a snake, seemed trying to fascinate his enemies ; suddenly he
259. a yell of triumph. is " The shark biting at the hook," said Redwood. " I shall r
260. t will be because the bullet he is going to send over here prevents me." "It is
261. s calmly as a marksman feast, contesting a prize at a village finally and conclu
262. ested, dead wood against which he saying and contented himself with " Scoundrell
263. one wounded ?" he asked, in a trembling voice. "It's nothing but a scratch," re
264. ked, in a trembling voice. "It's nothing but a scratch," responded Pepe. " God b
265. ve without life. the red warriors giving any sign of " Our scalps tempt them, bu
266. y are still rather doubtful about coming for them," said Pepe, repressing a yawn
267. coming for them," said Pepe, repressing a yawn. " Patience," replied the Canadi
268. nters did so with great caution, keeping one knee to the ground, and began anew
269. nd both approached the bank with growing confidence; in the end, the their war-
270. light. " The Indians, if I know anything about them, are going to cross the rive
271. if I know anything about them, are going to cross the river one be- hind the oth
272. a knife." As the Canadian was concluding vice, a tall this ad- warrior entered t
273. hem riors, ghostly warspirits, returning from the land of silently and marching
274. g from the land of silently and marching upon the waters. To the Indians death s
275. with him, Black Bird^ whether foreboding some danger or because a ray of moonlig
276. er or because a ray of moonlight falling upon the gun-barrel of one of the hunte
277. en agreed on, and now they were standing, knife in islet, hand, on the edge of t
278. he edge of the deadly struggle. awaiting the "There are still seven of the Apach
279. ce of thunder, anxious to have the thing done with, and feeling all his antipath
280. to have the thing done with, and feeling all his antipathy for the Indians " Dar
281. or the Indians " Dare they come reviving at sight of them. and take the scalps o
282. of the river, half washed by the shining waters. " Do not the red warriors know
283. red warriors know how to scalp anything but corpses?" added Pepe, with a burst
284. t courage yelled the Spaniard, at seeing his enemies ing back to the shore. now
285. the Spaniard, at seeing his enemies ing back to the shore. now hasten- Suddenly
286. y he caught a glimpse of a body floating its on its back at some distance away;
287. its back at some distance away; gleaming eyes, however, betrayed that it was not
288. 's sake There let- Black Bird pretending to be dead and ting himself be carried
289. lack Bird pretending to be dead and ting himself be carried along by the cur- 88
290. ffer me a better revenge." Pepe took ing body. his rifle, and aimed at the float
291. he gave me and the trick he was try- ing to play us. still If he were dead he wo
292. ill If he were dead he would be floating." " You would have done better to " kil
293. Redwood. Ah V he exclaimed, is stamping on the ground, " what to be done now? I
294. ne now? I had hoped to finish by ripping up those devils in a hand-to-hand fight
295. nd-to-hand fight, and now can everything must begin over again. not cross the is
296. " Nevertheless do/^ it is the best thing we can " With Fabian here I would never
297. stand that they are hun- are, for gering for blood there like starving wolves."
298. for gering for blood there like starving wolves." 90 The Enemy Reinforced. The S
299. the tenacity with which In- dians cling to the idea of revenge. *' Not a doubt
300. " Faith there were only us two, gaining the other side of the river would not t
301. e. The seven who to us, are still living would come up no doubt, but we could di
302. f starry " So be it," said Pepe, sitting down beside his companion. bits of "But
303. "But look here, these five wood sticking in the ; ground are five dead Apaches b
304. the river? make no mistake in supposing that Black Bird sent the two who are ab
305. cornmeal, the moon were already falling more obliquely on the light eddies of t
306. es bent his ear to listen with a feeling akin to anxiety. "Will that cursed moon
307. I am uneasy ; I seem to hear some- thing like water rippling under it is feet, a
308. to hear some- thing like water rippling under it is feet, and not the noise mad
309. either side the columns of mist, turning as they rose, spread an almost impenetr
310. almost impenetrable veil over everything not very near his eyes. The coolness of
311. s. The coolness of the nights succeeding the intense heat of the days condenses
312. thick clouds of fog. the- "I see nothing but mist," said Pepe, in vexation. By d
313. ng to interval sink, the moon continuing the moving constellations retiring from
314. val sink, the moon continuing the moving constellations retiring from mid-heaven
315. nuing the moving constellations retiring from mid-heaven, and 94 2'he Enemy Rein
316. Enemy Reinforced. nature was slumbering underneath her canopy of white vapors w
317. anks of the river, in sounds so piercing and if prolonged that, even the mouths
318. ll. either shore would have been yelling impossible, the In- Flight now was isle
319. on may set now," cried Pepe, " clenching his hands with rage. right in suspectin
320. his hands with rage. right in suspecting the two Ah ! I waa who were absciit and
321. there are a hundred Indians surrounding us?" " True, the number does not signif
322. will lose by it." " Don't go to singing your death-song like the Indians, who,
323. ved like a man." " Better to be thinking of dying like Christians,'" answered Re
324. a man." " Better to be thinking of dying like Christians,'" answered Redwood. Th
325. tians,'" answered Redwood. Then, drawing Fabian close to him, he said: "I cannot
326. eatness; at other times think of nothing for you but the splendors of the wilder
327. lies down to sleep and him at his waking ; but what I can say that the dominant
328. of my heart it was that of never leaving you. that Must be in we shall find ours
329. ad closed above all that I loved, living being and the only place was you. who c
330. sed above all that I loved, living being and the only place was you. who could t
331. ters of a lake." A powerful voice rising from the bank op- posite the hunters ca
332. ed. Two war- riors, in fact, were giving him the support of their arms. " What i
333. heir arms. " What is the good of opening our ears ?" he shouted in stentorian to
334. plied the chief. " The whites are acting like vanquislied Indians 98 The Enemy R
335. gle laughs at the insults of the mocking-bird which assumes all voices, and it i
336. all voices, and it is not to the mocking-bird that the eagle deigns to speak." "
337. ho did not find this comparison soothing. " the To the giant, to his brother the
338. he river alone 99 and unarmed, and bring you will my scalp fresh on my head. Tha
339. you mad, Eedwood ?" cried Pepe, bounding like a wounded tiger. The Indian had ma
340. and instead he asks for to : death. ing. They can not come This is an understan
341. eply to this offer, still more insulting than that of joining Black Bird against
342. till more insulting than that of joining Black Bird against the Mexicans. The In
343. proposition. At last he went on speaking: " From now to the hour of torture the
344. hour of torture the whites are listening for the last time to the voice of a chi
345. e warriors, but like hungry dogs yelping after a bone of dried buffalo, then the
346. red behind the trees and ceased speaking. But Pepe was unwilling that he should
347. ceased speaking. But Pepe was unwilling that he should believe that he had frig
348. them, and he cried out with the boiling rage within as much coolness as him wou
349. permit to bark, " Dog, who know nothing but how the whites despise your idle bo
350. ow the whites despise your idle boasting; the sight of their skeletons will trou
351. of their skeletons will trouble nothing but your dreams despise you ! ! Jackal,
352. nd made at Black Bird the most insulting one that he could think of. 102 The Ene
353. d a little, and who, content with having had the satisfied. last word, all now s
354. " said the generous old let man, sighing, you had all me alone I would have ar-
355. the opposite bank, even though carrying in their arms the mutilated' Mexican. i
356. ep stupor. "And so," said Pepe, breaking iirst the mournful silence which hung o
357. , " to employ usefully the few remaining hours before daybreak." " To do what ?"
358. urselves to the current through that ing. It is dark enough now for the Indians,
359. k enough now for the Indians, not seeing us jump into the river, to let us gain
360. distance from them. on, I Hold am going to experiment before trying the plan."
361. old am going to experiment before trying the plan." As he said these words the C
362. nd presently the black mass was floating gently in the current. friends watched
363. ed man, 106 The FiresMp. if his groaning on his bed of pain, as ian angel were w
364. s bed of pain, as ian angel were warning guard- him him that there was a to his
365. a to his enemies. question of abandoning " What does it matter ?" resumed Red" I
366. " It would not be right ; it would bring us bad luck, Redwood," went on the Span
367. tims of duty and with the joy of knowing that you are safe and sound." Fabian sh
368. where all human resources are unavailing; one of those desperate situations from
369. e night come darker under the thickening mist; the 108 The Fireship. firm resolu
370. ored the one would have thought, judging from the perfect quiet reigning on eith
371. judging from the perfect quiet reigning on either bank, that they were entirely
372. of the night. Meantime the vapors rising from the bosom and of the river began g
373. to fury, as they had done in the evening, by bringing some of them down with the
374. hey had done in the evening, by bringing some of them down with their bullets. M
375. y of the In- dians to hope that, growing weary of a long blockade, Black Bird wo
376. omy thoughts, the hunters ceased talking, but they resigned themselves to their
377. eir fate rather than think of abandoning the wounded man in order to make a desc
378. to the slow and ignominious one awaiting him at the stake of the Indians. He res
379. emies; but to Fabian seemed a reassuring symptom, a favor from heaven by which t
380. h they ought to profit. all " Everything sleeps around us," said he ; " not mere
381. ians on the bank, life in but everything that has deserts; the woods and even th
382. sh. the reflections of the us. are dying far away from Would 112 The fHreship. n
383. f the two banks?" " The Indians sleeping !" interrupted Pepe, bitterly ; " yes,
384. in before you see the Indians springing in after you, you just now saw the wolv
385. olves do in pursuit Haven't you anything better of the deer. to suggest, Redwood
386. nadian, his while then. hand was seeking that of Fabian; Math the other he point
387. ted at the wounded man, who was writhing, even though asleep, still on his bed o
388. t least have The Fireship. that of dying with honor, as 113 and side by side, we
389. ore the life of the care Him with having sacrificed confided to our in the man H
390. dians probably more than tripled. Dying would be nothing. be But we would proba
391. ore than tripled. Dying would be nothing. be But we would probably and I made pr
392. or a few days my dis- happiness in being near you." Silence reigned once more ov
393. ayed group. cliild a This idea of living near his while longer was to the Canadi
394. on in his rage, so Redwood, anticipating in imagination the day of the denouemen
395. tree-trunks against which ho was leaning. the islet Under his powerful clasp tre
396. he river, and to advance, seemed growing larger as it came, like the reflection
397. flection of a fire which is increas- ing. And, strange as it may seem, the fire
398. d. 116 The Fireship. Instead of yielding to a transport of rage, as Pepe liad do
399. anwhile the globe of river fire floating was increasing with frightful rapidity,
400. be of river fire floating was increasing with frightful rapidity, of the Cana- a
401. pidity, of the Cana- and thus confirming the truth dian's words. Already, amidst
402. ncture of distinct. islet, were becoming The Fireship. " they '' 117 It is a fir
403. d offer no op- position to the devouring action of the flame, and would have no
404. me, and would have no chance of escaping the except by jumping into the water. i
405. chance of escaping the except by jumping into the water. it fire And then would
406. f branches stripped from a After setting it resinous pine. fire to this in- cend
407. islet. The raft advanced, the crackling of the resinous wood already began to b
408. 120 A Brilliant Idea. yell accompanying, as is usual, the death throes of a war
409. rior. The flame far away, of the burning fagots, a direct line now not islet, an
410. ry. " Demonio .'" he exclaimed, stamping his foot, " I shall die more easily now
411. redskinced devils." And still clasp- ing his rifle, his eye sought in every dire
412. , fire The Canadian, was coolly watching the mass of which, on going its aground
413. lly watching the mass of which, on going its aground on the branches. islet must
414. judgment, " is very fine to be studying that firebrand, but can you A. Brillian
415. said the Canadian, briefly, eoTitinuing his examination. his teeth Pepe began w
416. mination. his teeth Pepe began whistling through with an air of indifference, by
417. resumed Eedwood ; " I perceive something which convinces me that the is reasonin
418. which convinces me that the is reasoning of these sons of the forest fallible, n
419. arrows to and prevent us from I pushing away their torch, little would care as
420. h, little would care as for that flaming raft as for a firefly floating in the a
421. t flaming raft as for a firefly floating in the air." In constructing the sort o
422. ly floating in the air." In constructing the sort of flooring of dampened weeds
423. r." In constructing the sort of flooring of dampened weeds the Indians of which
424. with the branches of the tree supporting it, almost at the moment when the whole
425. he keen eye of the Canadian, who, taking a long pole in his hand, resolved to sc
426. the weeds and prevent them from igniting; but at the very to risk this moment wh
427. well, it is a risk to run." The burning mass was almost touching islet; the in
428. n." The burning mass was almost touching islet; the in a few it. moments more th
429. es when, with the swiftness of lightning, the Canadian slipped into the water an
430. aniard and Fabian, who remained floating tree alone, beheld the rock it beneath
431. ight; fireplace threw out a more glowing then presently the water hissed, and 12
432. nches, turned course, passed on, rubbing against islet, the rushes of the while
433. rushes of the while amidst the yell- ing of the stupefied Indians, Redwood rejoi
434. companions. The islet was still rocking under the effort it. made by the Canadi
435. your ease," said Redwood, on recovering his breath us yet ; ; " you have not go
436. sudden Pepe sprang to his feet, stifling a cry, and this time it was a cry of jo
437. ian, in a " Saved repeated the trembling tone. quickly." "Oh! speak, Pepe, speak
438. just now? Well, I had thought of making a raft of the trunks that are beneath o
439. Redwood. "To work! work! The freshening wind indicates the approach of morning;
440. g wind indicates the approach of morning; we have not too much time before us. I
441. with his two companions be- fore rising to his feet. "What Fabian. are you goin
442. to his feet. "What Fabian. are you going to do?" asked islet " Cannot we three r
443. dea. 127 run the rope risk of scattering like a fagot when its is broken, and ou
444. fety deislet just as pends on preserving the has ' nature made it. There is perh
445. inel who companions to is either warning his keep their eyes open, or like their
446. e, which is more wicked- ness, notifying us that tion. we are under inspec- It i
447. death-song with which they are regaling us." The Canadian had the same barely c
448. these voices were none the less alarming, since they revealed all the perils and
449. te too well already." this, While saying Eedwood entered It the water with the g
450. y from the surface, like a diver seeking along the sides of a vessel for the lea
451. ns to wreck to destruction. it and bring it " Well," asked Pepe quickly, when th
452. ed on several anchors ?" is " Everything plied going on well, I think," re- Redw
453. l anchors ?" is " Everything plied going on well, I think," re- Redwood; "I see
454. "A whale might get stuck on it a fishing boat which could send flying twenty fee
455. t a fishing boat which could send flying twenty feet into the air more easily th
456. n. A rather long time elapsed^ if during which, as Fabian's fears were about to
457. e islet, which presently be- gan rocking on its base like a vessel in the swell
458. lt that the giant effort. must be making and powerful Fabian's heart contracted
459. ught that Redwood was perhaps struggling against death, and then a heavy crack,
460. ke that of the timbers of a vessel going to pieces on a rock, made itself heard
461. again to the surface, his hair streaming with water and his face inflamed with t
462. In fact, afloat." while he was speaking, the islet advanced, urged by the curre
463. hunters kept silence. They were watching the movements of the floating islet too
464. e watching the movements of the floating islet too anxiously to exchange a singl
465. sed still more heavily the vapors rising from the river. The fires on the banks
466. he danger was and the chance of escaping the notice of the Indian sentinels almo
467. . but another peril menaced The floating island, no matter how gently 134 Betwee
468. wed it the course of the stream, turning as went, and it it was to be feared tha
469. ircled shook under a light breeze coming from one of the shores, it site seemed
470. cline toward the oppo- one by describing a large circle; some- times, also, when
471. od continues favor us, plenty of yelling will echo along these peaceful shores w
472. new risk exposes a I tell man to losing all his resources. you frankly, Redwood
473. d reverie took possession of him, during which, like a man whose body absent, he
474. no longer the movements of the floating island. was because to the hunter who f
475. life was equivalent to death; up seeing Fabian every of day, and the consolatio
476. very of day, and the consolation feeling his adopted son close his eyes in their
477. le. In the hunter's soul there was going on a struggle between the civilized man
478. ore Pepe interrupted For some minlooking the reverie of the Canadian. utes the f
479. rief above the river. " We are deviating from our course, Red- wood," said Pepe,
480. ose 138 Between Hope and Despair. waving mists which seem thicker yonder must be
481. is true," answered the Canadian, resting his mind from its meditations ; " it is
482. made for the last half hour by noticing the fires still burning to right and le
483. hour by noticing the fires still burning to right and left of us." At this point
484. left of us." At this point the floating islet seemed to receive a more rapid im
485. glance. The bank. raft was still moving toward the which but just now One of th
486. ist gradually increased of the trembling its luster before the eyes Redwood. Alr
487. Hope and Despair. 139 warriors standing erect and motionless in his frightful w
488. ovement of his finger to the warrior ing on his lance. Happily, the fog was too
489. the islet, dark as mass of the floating as softly a water-bird on the sarfaee o
490. e raised his head and shook the floating mane with it which was adorned. " Could
491. rned. " Could he have suspected anything ?" said the Canadian to Pepe. " Ah ! if
492. thrust the lance on which he was resting into the ground, lean forward, and arch
493. eyes as if to concentrate their piercing glances. A dart of anguish transfixed t
494. bent double, like a its wild beast lying in wait for prey, his face half covered
495. f a sudden the Apache, after remain- ing for some instants in the attitude of a
496. pointed out to Fabian the bank. burning on the The Indian had just returned to
497. ust returned to his post and was leaning on his lance in his for- mer attitude.
498. rtheless the islet was still approaching the river bank. ^' If this goes on," sa
499. 143 "And perhaps yet it it is the thing we ought run the to do; risk of would b
500. ood and flung it into the river. Leaning over the edge, Pepe and Redwood watched
501. h served cursor. it as pre- The floating islet seemed, in fact, to re- main moti
502. motionless for an instant ; but obeying, nevertheless, the impulsion of the fir
503. ur passed in this way between ; piercing alternatives of hope and fear then the
504. andoned to his own caprices, but feeling at last the hand and islet spur of a sk
505. et spur of a skilful rider, the floating ceased turning round, and followed the
506. ilful rider, the floating ceased turning round, and followed the current more ra
507. Dutch howker, which " Very well, saying a great deal." like. land where you Red
508. al our traces from the Indians, carrying, if necessary, the wounded man in our a
509. quely toward the and in about a reaching the quarter of an hour the islet, bank,
510. and we are in God be blessed for having permitted I hold me to save all most de
511. is hand to Pepe and Fabian. After giving the scalped man a few mo- ments to reco
512. e as fast as possible from a new meeting with the Indians, that he almost Saved!
513. orgot the atrocious pain he was enduring,. He declared that he could go as fast
514. s three themselves, and proposed setting off at once. " said We have some precau
515. . Already disjointed re- by the breaking of the root which had tained it in the
516. its contact with the bank, the floating did not offer a long resist- ance to th
517. cupied himself When Eedwood, in effacing their footprints by setting up again th
518. in effacing their footprints by setting up again the stems of the wild plants t
519. they were gation on the still continuing their navi- islet. The march was too fa
520. navi- islet. The march was too fatiguing to be rapid, and yet, after an hour, at

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: https://concordances.library.nd.edu/app/