Concordance for Ethelred Preston, or, The adventures of a newcomer / By Francis J. Finn ...

Use the features on this page to analyze and evaluate the text.

View: catalog record
Display words beginning with
Display most frequently used words
Display most frequent word phrases
Search: Show map
Display letters around search term
Sort results by the word on the

Specialized searches: colors; adverbs; gerunds; "big names"; "great ideas"

1.   of the Snows The Best Foot Forward; and Other Mostly Boys. Short Stories His First an
2. , XII. In which . . 129 Ethelred " Gets Religion" over a new Leaf, ..... .... . and turn
3. In which the Darling Runs away Earnest, Good 201 XVIII. A Memorable Morning, . . * .
4. red failed to Reach Henryton in 223 Due Time which Mothers, Ethelred * Finds the Bes
5. the right and a great larger pile thus many to his left. The letters formed was mad
6. ce. terity With the a dex- born of long experience, president could ascertain, in most cas
7. secretary, entered the room. " For the vice-president/' said Father Ed- munds, poin
8. careful letters, narrowed his field of labor, Edmunds addressed himself to a more ex
9. d from see their mid-winter at must the vice-president once/' " Father Howard," he e
10. oward," he exclaimed, as he entered the vice-president's room a moment later, " have
11. It is after reflection and thought and many tears that I address myself to your kin
12. to face a I trial, which, as alas, but one week ago could not so little much I hav
13. er, if you but knew what that meant. No one but a mother can appreciate The dear ch
14. n away from my Whatever he not even for one day. side knows and he has gone quite f
15. r in spelling and botany, including the language of flowers I have taught him myself, an
16. the head. of He all is not at all like other boys, whom is it may be said that they
17. alk, accompanied with a little coaxing, will never fail to bring him to his senses.
18. He has never been subjected to corporal punishment the dear child is high-strung, and so n
19. nd so nervous, and would be injured for life by such barbarous Under no circumstance
20. means bring a cow along," muttered the vice-president. If possible, he should have
21. iscoa palian in theory, and my dear boy will probably I the same church. am bigoted
22. ry, and my dear boy will probably I the same church. am bigoted woman, and good Cath
23. the same church. am bigoted woman, and good Catholics, many of whom will doubtless
24. . am bigoted woman, and good Catholics, many of whom will doubtless go to heaven. My
25. woman, and good Catholics, many of whom will doubtless go to heaven. My boy is natur
26. arl, whose reputation stands very high, will be a suitable companion for my boy as f
27. any boy can be a suitable companion for one who has had such home train- — ing as
28. Ethelred has enjoyed. If there are any good Catholic boys attending your College, 5
29. uld have explained to you my reason for being obliged to separate myself from my swee
30. his precious health— may- hap is his life —by taking him along. but it The part
31. mother s prayer and a mother's blessing will accompany you through difficult, moist
32. company you through difficult, moist be life. Thanking you in advance for your kindn
33. HELRED PRESTON. P.S. 1 — Enclosed you will find a check or a draught or a bank not
34. g London I shall forward more. My child will reach you on Thursday morning. I have b
35. parent. Meantime ences. If it would be good to write for refer- you have no objecti
36. ion, I shall attend to that part of the matter myself." And there was no objection. On
37. On the next morning, at about card. the same hour, the college porter brought Father
38. le Lord Edmunds as he en- countered the vice-president in the hall. Father Edmunds w
39. ident in the hall. Father Edmunds was a man whom long ex- perience as a disciplinar
40. lf from his lips. And he had reason for being astonished. 1 ETHELRED PRESTON. CHAPTER
41. ining the sequence fortieth or fiftieth time, be it of tenses (for the said), in and
42. ung gentleman ner seats. pupil's eye If one of the cor- he counted upon catching th
43. nous frown deepened his forehead. Every one in the class with the exception of the
44. explain, I you must devote yourself to other work. have been very much disappointed
45. him, dreaded his displeasure above all punishment. fallen a strained silence upon the roo
46. on the room as the professor spoke, and one could see the students' by the expressi
47. oyed. Something has gone wrong with the same boy at He doesn't seem to be that he us
48. very negligent in his studies, and from being the leader he to the foot. I is now get
49. ng down don't think he has last given a good recitation for the two or three weeks,
50. ecting Mr. this long Gade to him down I time." " feel very bad about the whole affai
51. d- ' 22 ETHELRED PRESTON, have having a good talk ing-room, and doesn't do anything
52. lt like with him a dozen times, but the chance has never offered itself, and I have be
53. o." do it, though I'm afraid that he 11 will hardly be in any I humor just now for a
54. then he understood. was quivering with emotion, and there was a suspicious moisture in
55. deserve " Do you think asked EarL every time." I deserved that scolding ?" " Since y
56. " I must do. All the fellows think the same/' Earl's Again features were convulsed,
57. g a retired spot, gave full vent to his emotion. This was Earl's third year at College,
58. r seen him shed a tear. The few minutes life. of the present recess prom- ised to be
59. me- what serious turn in everything, of mind, remarkably earnest for his piety. and
60. was in a a Lutheran, and practised his religion edified his fellow manner that surprise
61. the chapel and at prayers was such that many of his com- panions had been as long as
62. efore learning that he was not of their religion. He won the name first of being a deepl
63. heir religion. He won the name first of being a deeply religious lad early in his yea
64. the Mass, at which, according to the of custom Henryton College, all the students assi
65. . " Ed Devereux, honest question, and " Will you give it ? I'm going to ask you an I
66. f the Altar ' ? were able, I'd lick the man who said I didn't," returned tiny Ed, w
67. ce. " Well, then, I can't for the stand life of me under- how you can do, if carry o
68. tholic myself, and I 25 certainly never will be one in but I try to show reverence c
69. yself, and I 25 certainly never will be one in but I try to show reverence chapel o
70. When Ed learned then and there for the time that the boy who sat beside him at serv
71. everence ence; from that hour dated his love and respect for Earl Meriwether, which
72. you said things that Catholic. 11 among other become a " you never intended Did you I
73. e," said Earl. " Well, perhaps been the cause. my conduct along with the conduct of s
74. t along with the conduct of some of the other fellows may have Now you know, Earl, we
75. t he wouldn't do anything wrong for the world. Yet, if you watch him at services, you
76. ise that would be true to little my own religion when was a boy of seven, nearly eight y
77. ." Devereux's face flushed with genuine pleasure at these words. this He had come to loo
78. inspired. was made up friendship is and love. Such a It supposes on the part of him
79. nd a manliness that are seldom found in one person. " Nothing would hear it," said
80. wouldn't think even of telling interest will it to you, only I in know and value the
81. his story. Now what is as Earl's early life has much to to do w ith r to come, I sh
82. I shall tell the reader Meriit wether's history as he related Ed, with cer- tain detail
83. r and a Protestant mother: was what the world said. As a matter of fact, his father w
84. t mother: was what the world said. As a matter of fact, his father was hardly a Cathol
85. , even in the loosest and most strained sense of the word. Mr. Meriwether had been ba
86. chool parents were of that faith. of no religion. Three years he married an accomplished
87. stood no bar of Earl's in the shape of religion. To mother Mr. Meriwether was the embod
88. he was shocked by his ETHELRED PRESTON. evil courses, 29 and attributed them to the
89. courses, 29 and attributed them to the religion attempted to practise. which he had nev
90. ng day after day over the wreckage of a life to which, for better or for worse, she
91. the last moned to the bedside of his 30 time. after ETHELRED PRESTON. She held him l
92. coherent passionate, almost greeting of love, she recovered herself, and, in terms t
93. said finally, " that I ask you to give will me your solemn word you be true to your
94. me your solemn word you be true to your religion —true till we meet again in a brighte
95. true till we meet again in a brighter world.' With his arms about his mother's neck
96. nd the mild, sweet eyes that had beamed love were closed forever, while upon the gen
97. while upon the gentle features lay the peace of God. In accordance with his mother's
98. on the gentle features lay the peace of God. In accordance with his mother's desire
99. of God. In accordance with his mother's desire, Earl was placed His her father, in the
100. within the year of Mrs. Meri- wether's death-— became a convert to the Cath- ETFTE
101. owever, she made no endeavors to Earl's religion, interfere with but encouraged him in t
102. he proved himself to be a thor- oughly good boy. leader in the yard, A up leader in
103. ard, A up leader in the class, a to the time of the open- ing of the present story,
104. roubles had begun. was evident to every one that he was no longer the close and con
105. word, a decided and most disappointing change had come to Mr. Gade was much concerned
106. d reserve which could be preted in only one light. inter- Mr. Gade, although of a h
107. f a highly nervous position, dis- was a man of more than ordinary prutact. dence an
108. s young charges he rarely made mistakes judgment, and in the present case, accordingly,
109. students had made, as was their yearly custom, a retreat of three days. exercises wer
110. nown missioncould thrill, ary priest, a man who by his elo- quence in the pulpit, e
111. riends who in the common intercourse of life recog- nized in him as his salient trai
112. ing for 53 of the light and consolation religion, partly through the desire of hearing a
113. onsolation religion, partly through the desire of hearing a burning eloquence, attende
114. f hearing a burning eloquence, attended man famed the various for his instructions;
115. he lips, first words that fell from the good father's was had rapt and fascinated, E
116. arise in all their strength. the sweet life and untainted its stream of his innocen
117. ilous ways. Earl ened yet, ; he dreaded sin as few boys dread daily, and do what he
118. ass-room itself, that face of poisonous beauty hovered about him his resistance still
119. hovered about him his resistance still sin with its and before him, and despite ho
120. at preceded the beginning of the of his life. retreat was the most troubled It was a
121. out of which he came free from serious sin, but bruised and bleeding, nevertheless
122. eemed to sound in his heart a voice, It will n You cannot keep be the same fight it
123. voice, It will n You cannot keep be the same fight it up! Think of it! day after day
124. the voice of the tempter which perverts truth It —the lying voice in every possible
125. who, when he cannot conquer the strong soul by direct attack, strives to weaken it
126. to weaken it by discouragement. Next to virtue, the devil hates cheerfulness. And . Ea
127. s regarded as full of ETHELRED PRESTON. beauty and sovereign merit; and, angel could i
128. ESTON. beauty and sovereign merit; and, angel could if 35 his guardian have but commu
129. eloquent missioner, the hideousness of sin, and describe the methods it; of fighti
130. dently; troubled, for he bound, on the one hand, to keep true to the promise which
131. uire discipline his mother, and, on the other, bound closely into the doctrine more o
132. of and the Catholic Church, which apas being the proved true itself to his mind and
133. pas being the proved true itself to his mind and heart Church of Christ. Thus the re
134. TON. from the slippery brink of for the time being, sin, had plunged him into a phas
135. from the slippery brink of for the time being, sin, had plunged him into a phase of d
136. e slippery brink of for the time being, sin, had plunged him into a phase of doubt
137. g himself to consult or advise with any one. Absorbed, then, found it in these ment
138. he had exceedingly difficult to fix his life, attention upon the daily affairs of an
139. ost impossihis ble to give his studies. mind for any length of time to In consequenc
140. ive his studies. mind for any length of time to In consequence, his position in ; cl
141. class changed rapidly and he who had in other years been the promptest to answer, the
142. ame the day when he received, for first time since his coming to college, a public r
143. nd, as The rebuke was left Earl saw the matter, so un- deserved, that he the room with
144. eserved, that he the room with a bitter sense of outraged justice. Boys are tify like
145. he room with a bitter sense of outraged justice. Boys are tify like men. They its are p
146. like men. They its are prone to iden- a principle with exponent; to judge of the truth or
147. rinciple with exponent; to judge of the truth or falsity of a religion by their likes
148. ; to judge of the truth or falsity of a religion by their likes or dislikes for those re
149. it wounded vanity and remembered, was a good boy; but even good boys have the passio
150. nd remembered, was a good boy; but even good boys have the passions of their kind. E
151. RESTON'. not to Eddie Devereux. He gave many of the facts set down in this chapter,
152. s position better, was by no means able state of the question. to understand the exac
153. She seemed and she did nothing but the time. isn't I ah suppose he's a sort of a wa
154. gers, while at the smile, already broad same time his beyond the average, wid- ened
155. while at the smile, already broad same time his beyond the average, wid- ened a tri
156. ould make out, was to hands, and at the same time continue to hold the hat unchanged
157. make out, was to hands, and at the same time continue to hold the hat unchanged upon
158. were a " I'm fourteen just." " Indeed! One would take you to be teen, at the very
159. n," continued youth, " talks about I me same I've as she used to right smart was ver
160. t of Henryton College. Sir: This letter will introduce to Ethelred Preston, a boy of
161. ou Master a most estimable and cultured family. He is a God-fearing lad, of a very ple
162. estimable and cultured family. He is a God-fearing lad, of a very pleasing address
163. y college in the land. It is against my will and my advice that he is sent to a Cath
164. weet qualities of heart and his talents will excellent be duly recognized and apprec
165. s — budding character. Hoping that he will receive the care and attention to which
166. , and trusting that his religious views will not be unduly influenced as he is a mos
167. emember; sixty cents, for I believe." " Will you take a quarter " I don't want to se
168. do you ? " No; but you might forget, or change you* Well, mind. People often do. So, i
169. you might forget, or change you* Well, mind. People often do. So, if Tve been foole
170. been fooled that way now li — lots of time?. you can give me them Wait just till d
171. can give me them Wait just till dinner-time. We go to the washI room before dinner,
172. " Haven't you been " studying all your life ? " I guess not. } What kind of a schoo
173. e was wounded felt chafing It under the sense of justice. was the first time that he
174. nded felt chafing It under the sense of justice. was the first time that he had ever be
175. der the sense of justice. was the first time that he had ever been disloyal to his c
176. ntre-table. on " Yes: a boy hasn't much liberty here." " Well; you'll see they won't ho
177. n In a word, he was not himself. " What will your mother do, away ? " he asked, weak
178. - She won't know the ence. " Where €$ will you go, then ? M have friends lots of '
179. get the rest of money from some of the other fellers/ for a " You're pretty cool new
180. I ;, nothing like business. I want to a chance know where to am. Say, you'll get me ge
181. ; and I'll introduce you all around." " Many boys here, Meriwether ? " " There are a
182. about sixty in our division, and nearly one hundred and fifty in the senior divisio
183. ll come from?" " Pretty much from every State even from California. in the Union, Bes
184. wcomer to which, luckily for Ethelred's peace of the did mind, not hear. Before dinne
185. luckily for Ethelred's peace of the did mind, not hear. Before dinner-time Ethelred'
186. f the did mind, not hear. Before dinner-time Ethelred's artless speech had been rehe
187. was a sight to win enthusiasm from any one ETHEL RED PRESTON. whose eyes were aliv
188. RESTON. whose eyes were alive to the 55 beauty of scenery. Before them stretched the c
189. everal village church-steeples; further many a dainty cottage among the as far as vi
190. impling and changing the noble curve of one of America's most beautiful rivers. Bac
191. tting of as exquisite scenery as boy or man Earl. could desire, " Isn't that beauti
192. isite scenery as boy or man Earl. could desire, " Isn't that beautiful ! " ejaculated
193. you won't " that I'm going to run away, will you ? It's if " that none of my busines
194. k, though, you wait long enough you may change your mind. place. I Most of the boys he
195. ou wait long enough you may change your mind. place. I Most of the boys here till li
196. you not a Catholic, and I No, I'm never will be one." said " That's right," enthusia
197. a Catholic, and I No, I'm never will be one." said " That's right," enthusiasm; " I
198. he starry flag for 57 which our fathers Liberty sir," bled and suffered, and under whic
199. nd under which smiles upon a rejoonated world. No he added, dropping quotation to his
200. anada and the Catholics take field. The idea of your talking about not going with Ca
201. ty high, you see," explained " It's the same at the lower end of the Earl. yard: the
202. rang for the end Ethelred had obtained life, some few to ideas on college little, o
203. Eddie had already formed new-comer. his opinion of the otj Ethelred with his hat perche
204. ion which, to the who has been for some time at board- ing school, invites teasing o
205. nvites teasing on sight. 11 It's a real pleasure to me to meet you/ 3 said Ed, with a sm
206. il." " What did he do that 11 for ? " ? Sign the declaration " asked Ed, suavely whi
207. ETHELRED PRESTON. Do you mean Hereat a life insurance company >t ? Roger are explod
208. tilted nose. " You mean in the Catholic sense, I suppose. Catholics honor the bones a
209. he Catholic sense, I suppose. Catholics honor the bones and garments, and the things
210. ir dead who were very fine particularly good and holy; but some are not people who C
211. lred, heartily. " But Protestants don't mind honoring the remains of dead people, pr
212. people eyes. were great and famous the world's For instance, they'll travel far to s
213. e, they'll travel far to see ; and they honor a sword worn by Washington and if owned
214. not even if the bishop were the holiest man that ever lived." "I guess that's about
215. f Eddie's remarks, and so, resolving to change the subject, stone ?" and return to the
216. f the three laughers, Ear! was the only one who preserved any semblance of self-con
217. d. ing trio did not hear them. the only one it who was watching for And was good th
218. nly one it who was watching for And was good that he was, with a last oath, Ethelred
219. raised to strike his friend. With more language turned upon Earl. 11 of the street, Eth
220. u up," he shouted. rescue, But here the other two came to the and oner. the belligere
221. self to Devereux, " and I'll thrash the life out of you." " Do you '* really want to
222. you." " Do you '* really want to fight life ? " asked Ed. I You can just bet your d
223. ching, but Haines and if must be boxing will through. Meriwether be referees tion; a
224. rough. Meriwether be referees tion; and time-keepers, we'll I you have no objec- and
225. ntest. If you call it a fight, the boys will laugh at you." " I say, " said Ethelred
226. der that Master Ethelred's carriage and language before the students were quite differen
227. his inter- view with the president and vice-president of Henryton. In the company o
228. e nerves. i This ' smile was Ethelred's idea of company' manners. In recording the v
229. ers. In recording the various pearls of wisdom fall which, in the course of this narra
230. s of putting lips, the writer takes the liberty of down most Ethelred's words, not as t
231. sture, in carriage, in The case The boy language was a far as externals boor. There was
232. mother's care, nothing which would lead one to suppose that he had ever before ente
233. ad ever before entered a parlor. In the vice-president's room, as Father Howarjd to
234. y ; Ethelred had gone on smiling in the same way. When again ; he had no answer, he
235. our charge. have to say, he I feel a is good boy, will appreciate kind treatment, an
236. . have to say, he I feel a is good boy, will appreciate kind treatment, and of excel
237. eye on him. Once he feels at homep you will find him a good, docile boy. Yours trul
238. e he feels at homep you will find him a good, docile boy. Yours truly, James Hickson
239. rom pure Coming here in such a frame of mind, it is but natural that he should show
240. natural that he should show the Well* I will rough corners of his character. judge h
241. t And room In to he at once went to the vice-president's hand him the mayor's small
242. tened " Darl- ing." Blessed with a very good appetite, Ethelred was rather it. origi
243. t the bell's tinkle, and this upon over one owners of hundred and twenty merry ears
244. ne nothing to secure the respect of any one. On finishing his meal, which, consider
245. to his mouth and employed the remaining time spent in the dining-hall in ex- amining
246. elred Preston, wanted to fight me, told will and I him I'd do it with boxing-gloves.
247. two fellows to see we don't clinch, It will it there'll be no harm done. be an that
248. 75 in dressing Roger took the muscles. liberty of feeling Ethelred's He gasped with af
249. t. " Oh, what a biceps! ,: he cried. by one, and in perfect order, the Then one you
250. by one, and in perfect order, the Then one young gentle- men who had formed ling's
251. what looked very like a jig, and at the same time warding off the blows with an ease
252. looked very like a jig, and at the same time warding off the blows with an ease whic
253. ot out again, and the glove touched the same spot for the second time. On this occas
254. ve touched the same spot for the second time. On this occasion it hurt just the leas
255. sion it hurt just the least little bit. Time was called, finding Ed smiling radiantl
256. You'll know who you're talking to next time." u To Mamma's Darling," sang out Peter
257. ound, with unusual vivacity. M ends all Time— blood! it," " called out Haines. " T
258. , it was deserted. He shivered; for the change from the warm, comfortable gymnasium to
259. ithout is likely to be appreci- ated by one ing-contest. who has just come forth fr
260. who has just come forth from a boxUnder other circumstances, he a little might have b
261. hty-five cents," he I'll said. " That's good dollars for a beginning. have ten by to
262. e turned towards a serious- faced young man with a slight mustache, " per- haps you
263. the dignity of Professor Salvini was of Philosophy. He a a professor with student's love o
264. osophy. He a a professor with student's love of fun. Stroking his mustache, sternly,
265. division " The both." president and the vice-president " There," exclaimed the profe
266. now appioached a tall, cadaverous young man who could not have group, there been mo
267. es, " till the president places. and is vice-president " ? learn their Where is, the
268. Stamp- " It's Preston, sir," suggested one of the group. " That," returned Profess
269. s the boy has no record, and as, on the other hand, the difference between ' pressed
270. " I was sent there by the president and vice- president." when you address me," comm
271. the pro* &4 fessor to E2HELRED PRESTON. one of the last of the group, M Fil hear yo
272. the last of the group, M Fil hear your one hundred have done with lines of memory
273. our one hundred have done with lines of memory lesson after I this young man. Smoking
274. nes of memory lesson after I this young man. Smoking on the sly must stop in this c
275. since his entrance at whereas the young man v/ho, for the time being, was addressed
276. at whereas the young man v/ho, for the time being, was addressed as Probeen called
277. hereas the young man v/ho, for the time being, was addressed as Probeen called away f
278. ty, he might have perceived that he was being made the victim of a new €i practical
279. But think of Third Commercial! Who your being put in the examined you ?" ETHELRED PRE
280. the president must go too." M How much time did he spend in examining you ? " resum
281. minutes." " Monstrous! Why doesn't the vice-president attend to his own business, w
282. t boy upon the grounds, there was not a one whose face, single so long, at least, a
283. sentence of which our i giddier pupils love to sing to the air of Home, hun- sweet
284. o the air of Home, hun- sweet home/ You will now take the first dred lines of this c
285. tion and rize it memo- within an hour's time." I M But Ethelred. don't know no Latin
286. better. Before you begin, instructions. desire to give all, you a few First of you are
287. When the recess begins after the second will slip hour of studies, you over quietly
288. ion to the place where you had the high honor of first making my acquaintance. Do you
289. ED PRESTON. After you have learned your memory and you will return to the small boys,
290. er you have learned your memory and you will return to the small boys, play with the
291. y to in their hall. Now go work at your memory lesson, and don't you till dare to rais
292. raise your head from your book give the sign." I And down then Professor Petersol pa
293. ation to laugh aloud ; and occasionally one or another hall to give would rush inco
294. ou into this Slip out division to-night will be spoiled. this door,, by and be sure
295. sure not to breathe a syllable I to any one. lesson." excuse you from your memory E
296. any one. lesson." excuse you from your memory Ethelred, nothing loath, took his leave
297. professor followed his tall him by the same door; and form had hardly disappeared w
298. owed his tall him by the same door; and form had hardly disappeared when there enter
299. ce the prefect of the division. To find one hundred and twenty boys out of a possib
300. ndred and twenty boys out of a possible one silence hundred and fifty in perfect an
301. the prefect that the boy had defied any one to take him in, that Mr. Evans relished
302. tudy so But somehow, since then, all my mind goes wool-gathering the time. I wish yo
303. en, all my mind goes wool-gathering the time. I wish you'd pray 92 for in ETHELRED m
304. th Mr. a couple of days and Gade you'll will blow over be the same as ever." afraid
305. s and Gade you'll will blow over be the same as ever." afraid not. " I'm thing that
306. ll here, and have had a pretty cheerful time of it; and now the very first time a ne
307. rful time of it; and now the very first time a new- comer " is put in my charge, I b
308. , I begin by running the place down." A good many fellows say things like that ; abo
309. egin by running the place down." A good many fellows say things like that ; about th
310. othering you " That's not I it. I had a chance to take back said, but was too mulish o
311. ents. Presently he broke into a grin. " Good gracious! It's just the thing! Look her
312. be that he stays here for a week If he will be dismissed or expelled. tell you and
313. or expelled. tell you and I were to the vice-president what we know about him, Ethel
314. service. we Now, look; we've got to do one thing or the other report Ethelred as b
315. look; we've got to do one thing or the other report Ethelred as being unfit to go wi
316. e thing or the other report Ethelred as being unfit to go with the boys here, or help
317. hat we'll do. We'll find out whether he will go back to people who have will, a righ
318. ther he will go back to people who have will, a right to care for him. And if he the
319. or him. And if he then we'll be doing a good act to help him off." " It will be a go
320. doing a good act to help him off." " It will be a good thing for the boys here, cert
321. od act to help him off." " It will be a good thing for the boys here, certainly," sa
322. e, certainly," said Earl. " Yes, and it will in do no harm to any one our yard, as f
323. " Yes, and it will in do no harm to any one our yard, as far as I else. There's not
324. as I else. There's not a boy know, who will has the least temptation to run away; s
325. the case. They like the look upon it as being about the sort of thing which they migh
326. RED PRESTON. left 95 the play-room some time ago, and he ceris tainly not in the yar
327. refectory reader in the big boy's had a chance to give the reader refectory a few poin
328. ad rightly guessed the fact, though the cause he assigned was defective. It is true t
329. e some- what forward, or plumed himself life, upon his superior knowledge of or gave
330. plumed himself life, upon his superior knowledge of or gave evidences of being annoyingl
331. erior knowledge of or gave evidences of being annoyingly conceited, they were not slo
332. not slow 96 ETHELRED PRESTON. him to a sense of his in devising plans to bring posit
333. r, they imposed upon a new-comer than a love of harmless fun. Earl and Eddie were ar
334. n. Earl and Eddie were arrival still no other reason talking of the new when that wor
335. his cheek, so as to give the two boys a good view of that organ, " Do you see any gr
336. whether they had shown tree next to the one which George Washington cut with his li
337. , and this college unless you have some one is to take care of you." "What as busin
338. to it my business. It it was into it my will fault, for all I know, that you got ; y
339. 'll stop me ? " roared the Darling. " I will," answered Earl quietly. as they stood
340. Earl quietly. as they stood facing each other The two boys formed a striking contrast
341. mined. Earl's eyes, as he said latter I will," fell full upon for Ethelred's; the bo
342. fellows meddle so confoundedly, 1 don't mind telling you that the old - — my didn'
343. go the president of the college, like a man, and to tell him you have permission fr
344. here letter she told him to I me go any time wanted to." Eddie Devereux grinned. " Y
345. " said Eddie. he continued, " you, for one am willing to help you'll give your sol
346. 11 him All we want Like is your word of honor." in five or six Ethelred gave his word
347. n five or six Ethelred gave his word of honor varieties. many people who set little v
348. elred gave his word of honor varieties. many people who set little value on their wo
349. e in promising, and in attesting to the truth statements. seventy-five it of his own
350. now fawning. Money seemed of to be the one thing upon which he set value. Earl and
351. lgarity, he saw great promise of future other hand, had a keen sense of fun. all frol
352. romise of future other hand, had a keen sense of fun. all frolic. " Have you made up
353. un. all frolic. " Have you made up your mind as to which way you'll get out ? " he a
354. ere, and Earl and and Haiaes won't tell will hold besides. Of it, course, we the oth
355. ill hold besides. Of it, course, we the other fellows about but we must have a third
356. ird person to hold the rope, and Haines will * * be the very best." Where are you go
357. that; coil asked Ethelred. will we've got a tremendous of rope in the g
358. ght, so as to catch the train." 11 Very good. After second hour's studies there are
359. spare, and we I'll can do it easily. It will be dark then and all have the rope here
360. side-look, and as he did so there was a world of merriment in his eyef for he divined
361. dents too had the hapless in hand. " No matter," he said, turning with a perEthelred;
362. to "you tie can slip over here just the same. a jiffy, We'll the rope in and over yo
363. ou ?" M money." " How much money " Only one dollar and fifty cents, so help " That'
364. on some of the boys here, and have got one or two them. silent. dollars out of We
365. tter known as Peter to Edward Land, the other pseudo-professor, " I think so; he has
366. eudo-professor, " I think so; he has no idea of a college nor of college boys; far,
367. ; far, and if he has been quiet thus no one will be likely to enlighten him." stand
368. r, and if he has been quiet thus no one will be likely to enlighten him." standing a
369. retty quick, I'll clear out. A joke's a good thing, but I don't propose to freeze to
370. thing, but I don't propose to freeze to death for the sake of a laugh." ETHELRED PRES
371. ETHELRED PRESTON, " But Hale §i IC$ it will be rich. it I hope our friend Mr, will
372. will be rich. it I hope our friend Mr, will not take amiss." I don't see If why he
373. , he's mis- And I haven't forgotten the time when he sent me a box of cigars, upper
374. t of it " a collection of tracts on the evil of using fermented wine." " There's har
375. tinued Land, " that he hasn't worked in one way or other. That bottle came to Fatty
376. , " that he hasn't worked in one way or other. That bottle came to Fatty Archibald on
377. hich his last birthday Is that so? Last time he played a practical told joke on chan
378. time he played a practical told joke on chance, me he I me that, if I ever got the mig
379. ly, Ethelred at this point " What's the matter? You are out of breath, my " son," said
380. hickest, and then, catching the all his man, pro- ceeded to shake him with strength
381. eter disappeared from view: " Ethelred, idea of picking on the If you're a coward. s
382. there's not a boy here to do with you/' will have anything ETHELRED PRESTON. " . to)
383. ON. " . to) I don't care: let go of me, will you; let go — I won't touch him — Q
384. a grip that was extraordinary. " Well, good-night," ing on his heel. said Earl shor
385. of the young gentlemen here you, unless will become jealous of for we prepare the wa
386. quiet,'* whispered Sullivan, We want no one to know that you are here the ladder in
387. upon the centre-table was alight at the time that they entered, and threw a ened spl
388. oon as 109 are to touch nothing in this will room except the lamp, which you bed, an
389. eem danger. be much shall The door, you will observe, is locked. I When Professor Sa
390. do by means window, so as to keep your being here a secret from the boys, many to of
391. your being here a secret from the boys, many to of whom quite I regret to say are fr
392. ought Still, be from intruders. in, any one should come don't let him impose upon y
393. t I won't. "They're not going to fool " Good-night, boy. Go to bed." And the two pro
394. two professors departed by the window. One hour later, Mr. Hale, who had been down
395. all, willowy, young exquisite of twenty-one, with a light mustache, a delicate —
396. appearances, he to was a sensible young man, who gave pleasure many by his kindly w
397. e to was a sensible young man, who gave pleasure many by his kindly ways, and, with the
398. a sensible young man, who gave pleasure many by his kindly ways, and, with the trifl
399. ys, and, with the trifling exception of one or two upon whom he had played practica
400. a cigar in his mouth. while It was his custom before retiring to away an hour over a
401. clear out of this room right smart, or will be the worse for you." " You impudent f
402. d Mr. Hale, his if anger growing as his courage rose, " you don't get out of that bed a
403. oared Ethelreaching down and recovering one of his just I'll " You red, shoes, " an
404. be dealing with an escaped resolved to change his tactics. He " But, my dear sir," he
405. nd armed with shoes, pokers, little and one baseball bat, pattered six barefoot boy
406. ," retorted Ethel- red; " I've got more sense than your whole family." " Why," exclai
407. ; " I've got more sense than your whole family." " Why," exclaimed one of the young ge
408. n your whole family." " Why," exclaimed one of the young gentleit's men in white, "
409. broke into a it laugh, so hearty, that one would find hard to believe that they we
410. , who recognized Ethelred. all The five other boys, having been sick that day, had no
411. ing been sick that day, had not had the pleasure thus far of meeting the Darling. But Ha
412. D PRESTON. ported you to tl$ me you for being absent, and Fve been looking for since
413. t that it was not tally recorded by the angel against disciplinarians. who keeps coun
414. o it, and forgave the perpetrators. was one month before Professors Petersol and Sa
415. ri- ences that in entering upon college life he was brought into relations with othe
416. life he was brought into relations with other boys which were quite different from wh
417. is intention to borrow money from every one who was willing to lend, but Devereux a
418. remarks on to afternoon, had caused him change mind. His fellow-students, satisfied wi
419. on to afternoon, had caused him change mind. His fellow-students, satisfied with th
420. ceding day's fun, were content, for the time being, at least, to let him alone. So t
421. g day's fun, were content, for the time being, at least, to let him alone. So the mor
422. out a break in the calm flow of college life. During the recesses and recreations, E
423. de to feel that he should be put on the same footing with Preston. course, that Pres
424. ther a hatred of Catholics than any set form of worship. And yet this in remark of E
425. ed Ethel- " Oh, of course. In all I the time that I've been attending school here, f
426. ing jealousy or there are don't believe many hypocrites among boys, — at least, li
427. d him out pretty soon. But day when you will never are thrown in with a boy day in o
428. round here. They don't seem to show any religion at all. Now there's that Devereux, —
429. not a better He was here not remarkably good when he but came from Philadelphia; cha
430. d they talk that way, and they are just death on smoking and dancing and amoosements
431. person can be pious and cheerful at the same time." " Not much." " And," Earl contin
432. n can be pious and cheerful at the same time." " Not much." " And," Earl continued,
433. ed, " must not expect fun at all." if a man wants it, to be pious, according to you
434. on, according to them, his really pious sin when he does duty and avoid jolly duty
435. them, his really pious sin when he does duty and avoid jolly duty and avoids through
436. s sin when he does duty and avoid jolly duty and avoids through supernatural motives
437. nd avoids through supernatural motives. sin, Now, at the a boy can do his and same
438. . sin, Now, at the a boy can do his and same time have a good time." Ethelred snorte
439. , Now, at the a boy can do his and same time have a good time." Ethelred snorted. "
440. e a boy can do his and same time have a good time." Ethelred snorted. " If there's o
441. oy can do his and same time have a good time." Ethelred snorted. " If there's one th
442. d time." Ethelred snorted. " If there's one thing Earl, I envy the Catholic talking
443. t sets them or they need it, gives them good advice in encouragement when they are t
444. red. " " I don't want to read it." It's good — it's full of lively things. Them id
445. od — it's full of lively things. Them idea of \ priests ought all to be hanged. Th
446. ge light Earl, with a his eyes. " there one I thing that has disgusted me with some
447. e boys go of to Communion for the first time, some them look like angels; and I'm su
448. ho call themselves Protestants knew the good that confession and little Communion do
449. in But Ethelred was not the question of religion. easily to be silenced on course of the
450. sily to be silenced on course of the of being a As he admitted in the conversation, h
451. nce at the " professing Christian"; all same of time, he had read and re-read manner
452. he " professing Christian"; all same of time, he had read and re-read manner books c
453. imself he kept turning them over in his mind. Yet, turn them as he might, no satisfa
454. is hand was drumming idly upon the desk mind gave of itself to these difficulties. T
455. noyance passed over his face. The there punishment was nothing extraordinary; were several
456. . Gade had his used his severest tones, matter-of-fact voice. It instead of usual appe
457. ng no pains to give satisfaction. first time during the year that desk; teacher drum
458. ht, and all the pride and vanity of his nature were again in up arms. Once these passi
459. s face set and hardened. All thought of religion, of goodness, sweet retired and holy se
460. ELRED PRESTON. " Mr. Gade, you wouldn't mind something, sir all, my saying " ? " Not
461. that Earl think that he did more for a good boy. me than any boy here when I first
462. with Ed's loyalty to his friend. At the same time he was decidedly of the opinion th
463. Ed's loyalty to his friend. At the same time he was decidedly of the opinion that in
464. t the same time he was decidedly of the opinion that in Ed was mistaken his estimate of
465. ut the appearance of things. Ed, on the other hand, story, having heard Earl's was su
466. ubles to be thoroughly convinced of his good faith. Yet, knowing them in confi- denc
467. hem in confi- dence, he did not feel at liberty to reveal to Mr. Gade any to him. of th
468. ds him able. the meeting was inevitin a state of irres- At first Mr. Gade was olution
469. N, open to a ent exasperated and sullen state of mind would lay the teacher slight. B
470. o a ent exasperated and sullen state of mind would lay the teacher slight. Besides,
471. sent course deserved rebuke. On was the other hand, perhaps Eddie Devereux ; right or
472. er right, perin his haps there was some truth friend. defence of his Moreover —and
473. cost him a struggle, to try kindness. " Good afternoon, Earl," he said with a smile,
474. id with a smile, and in gentle tones. " Good afternoon, 95 said Earl touching Earl's
475. ave gone for ; nothing according to the world's meas- urement but according to a high
476. his was only when he had turned fuller sense of back upon his teacher that a conduct
477. and as that kind face fastened upon his imagination, the clouds of passion thinned and scat
478. s. The tears came him to Earl's eyes. A chance had been given to return to the former
479. he had let he could but apologize. his chance escape. The same pride which had led hi
480. d but apologize. his chance escape. The same pride which had led him to act thus dis
481. n his heart there 123 ETHELRED PRESTON. God for grace arose a short, earnest prayer
482. every act of kindness performed in this world of ours there is one sin the less. ETHE
483. erformed in this world of ours there is one sin the less. ETHELRED PRESTON. ttq CHA
484. rmed in this world of ours there is one sin the less. ETHELRED PRESTON. ttq CHAPTER
485. ur chattering. " Are you sure that rope will reach all the way down spare. ? " asked
486. ON. You had it's better go," urged Earh will ring in a " The few min- bell for the e
487. no use standing here and freezing M to death Ethelred gazed down again. it Despite t
488. , just to see Eddie Devereux, would you mind climbing down " how it goes ? "Next you
489. ou. If thing you'll want me to run away will for you don't hurry, your hands be so n
490. e made I'll for the tree. " No, no; go. Good-bye everybody." The three took a strong
491. oy/' commented of decency/* " He has no sense Roger Haines was chuckling. " It's one
492. ense Roger Haines was chuckling. " It's one on you, Eddie," he M said at length. of
493. 'll have to pay the damages." " I don't mind the expense," Eddie, 4< said the rueful
494. that bothers privileges for me. I'll my good conduct, consider myself although my co
495. nefactor to the college." 4 * Yes, Ws a good riddance," said Roger, 132 El'HELRED PR
496. RED PRESTON. bell. " But there goes the Good-night, boys f ears Fm going to take a r
497. " Yes, sir." " Where is he?" M By this time, sir, he ought the cars for home. to be
498. by a tremen- dous "comforter." A bright idea struck Ethelred. will " See here, Johnn
499. forter." A bright idea struck Ethelred. will " See here, Johnnie, how many papers yo
500. Ethelred. will " See here, Johnnie, how many papers you give me for this rope ? It's
501. don't want a rope." " You could hang a man with this/ urged Ethelred, M and the ro
502. ed Ethelred, M and the rope would be as good as new. Hold on, don't go away. ? What
503. ou throw €i an extra Star!** You said one." in •'* Come, throw one more copy,"
504. !** You said one." in •'* Come, throw one more copy," he pleaded. Eventually Ethe
505. 5 CHAPTER XII. m " WHICH ETHELRED "GETS RELIGION," AND TURNS OVER A NEW LEAF. AA/^^L, si
506. d to be as ugly as I made up my But let mind could. If got religion down at the depo
507. I made up my But let mind could. If got religion down at the depot. you back, I'll turn
508. view of Ethelred's confession, that the good ones were now felt to come into eviat d
509. aracter before him. " Well, Ethelred, I will give you one I more chance to redeem yo
510. him. " Well, Ethelred, I will give you one I more chance to redeem yourself. now r
511. l, Ethelred, I will give you one I more chance to redeem yourself. now receive you, ET
512. I used to go with our coachman all the time/' said Ethelred, looking gratified. " I
513. d receive * # in the * * * " I say, how world did you get back ?" asked Eddie Devereu
514. " st What— all Certainly/' of it ?" " Will you cents ?" let me off if I pay you tw
515. going — to spoil the I joke; it's too good. I'd like to pay you, but can't." " You
516. quite vexed. leav- But the little lad's sense of humor soon came to his rescue. Aside
517. d he didn't come to the dormitory up to time. The first I saw of him was this mornin
518. e too," assented Haines. " In the mean- time, we can wait till we learn more." in th
519. meantime, it wouldn't be bad to suspend judgment." just That's what doing," returned Dev
520. ux. as I can. feet ask " I'm suspending judgment as hard By in the way, Earl, what did t
521. is as hard to get information out of as sense out of a clothes-line. I the; you somet
522. oo, "added Roger. " Oh, you had nothing particular to do with it, Roger. You played a quie
523. s for all! me, Earl wouldn't If let any one is to blame it " Not the I." at all," s
524. all," said Earl; " I started him with I idea, and it seems to me that am the respons
525. it seems to me that am the responsible one. as And it even supposing you had I muc
526. didn't say that said that was alone the matter; simply had helped. I'm on the black-li
527. ad helped. I'm on the black-list anyhow other." just at present, and a little thing l
528. ent, and a little thing like that won't change my position one way or the At the begin
529. hing like that won't change my position one way or the At the beginning of morning
530. t the beginning of morning studies, the vice- president entered the junior students'
531. - cluded thus: " I am sorry to say that one of the leading boys of the junior divis
532. new-comer in his foolish notion. As the one I who assisted him has confessed on ; h
533. three within forty-eight hours of each other. concerned. Eddie Devereux was hardly l
534. ault. my Earl had a scruple because the time he met Ethelred he had made a remark ag
535. thought this remark run said if was the cause away; but that it Ethelred's wanting to
536. settled the scruple for him. would be a good thing for the college Ethelred were to
537. ring yourself to help a boy run serious matter/* away ? You know that is a Devereux th
538. n, set his reasons for tak- much in the same Earl. way as he had them forth before W
539. ion. Whatever he might think all of the reasoning, he felt sure, at events, that Eai{ and
540. ect and disregard for consciences which one naturally expects in such things. I no
541. longer look upon Earl's action in I the same way; and so. wish you would I tell Earl
542. reston. From what you have and Earl and many upon him day. as a fit said I gather th
543. Ethelred came here away. night, ft in a state of rebellion; he was not he ran last hi
544. he was not he ran last himself from the time of his entrance till On his reaching th
545. entered into himself. Then, of own free will, he came back here, and after apologizi
546. es to the dent of the college. in turn, will ask Earl Now I ask you, and you, of the
547. o and others give the new-comer another chance. Don't cona little demn him ness if pre
548. swered Eddie- " We'll wish little him a chance." I "And, Eddie, kindly send Earl here;
549. purpose of amendment, put himself, with will, the best of to carrying out the behest
550. g new-comer another the junior students chance. Thus appealed to, made no and at least
551. . Among themselves, however, there were many jokes passed about Ethelred's manner of
552. you ought to care. You see, in with the other fellows, and we're going to give you a
553. ows, and we're going to give you a fair chance." 150 ETHELRED PRESTON. Do you I " that
554. dine, care a snap whether you give me a chance or not ?" " You ought to, Darling/' " B
555. ently, 44 so green," said Peter and not one whit abashed. Say/' —here Peter broke
556. t your running away, just be- you know. cause Some say you ran away you got too much
557. broke into another ringing laugh. u And one of the fellows says that you took 1 ETH
558. oiling the rope." " Get away from here, will you, or I'll kick you all over the yard
559. ns, as you're a behind the class Jn the matter they saw before you came, or give It's
560. you came, or give It's you a few hints one way or the other. little a hard on a ne
561. ive It's you a few hints one way or the other. little a hard on a new-comer here is i
562. , it is not likely All or that the boys will try to bother you again. you've got to
563. t know you, and you are more home, They good fellows here, but some of them like to
564. us was such a trunk as the most baggage man would instinctively " hai^ die with car
565. l$3 his to rummaging in pockets. Out of one he took a handful of buttons, a spool o
566. " Halloa! " he exclaimed. " What's the matter, Ethelred " I " ? — I've lost I my tr
567. pale Ethelred had become. I think there will be some difficulty w 1 54 this is ETHEL
568. thes-keeper; " the lock not an ordinary one," Ethelred drew a deep breath. " You ne
569. eling sentiment which he was making for love of her. " Lend me a few and a tie colla
570. with a smile. " In fact, he's it. been good enough to call my me attention to He sa
571. r he stuck to the fellows. me the whole time, and abused everything Catholic. He's g
572. bused everything Catholic. He's got the idea into his head Oh, it was hard! 156 ETHE
573. s hard! 156 ETHELRED PRESTON. I that am being hoodwinked by the people here; to put t
574. y students, cants, number of the junior many near of whom were weekly communi- repai
575. started on perceiving Earl Meriwether. One by one, in regular order, the boys ente
576. d on perceiving Earl Meriwether. One by one, in regular order, the boys entered the
577. ned Catholic youths, they renewed their good resolutions, and begged for strength to
578. for strength to observe them. Eddie was one and on finish- of the first to make his
579. ttle; that is, I gave him a general ing idea of the things that were botherthat I me
580. ould go to his room, and talk the whole matter over with him at greater length. I'm go
581. s some- thing serious about the present state of affairs that I is, — I think that
582. that I've come to a point where have to change in one way or another, and that ETHELRE
583. come to a point where have to change in one way or another, and that ETHELRED chang
584. n one way or another, and that ETHELRED change is PRESTON-. It's 1 59 to be for better
585. has been dealing tell with boys all his life, and nothing you can him " will astonis
586. all his life, and nothing you can him " will astonish I him in the least." believe y
587. otioned him with "I hate to come to any man my troubles." The Father smiled. I "And
588. ieve understand your reason,'* "You are one of those characters that are called sel
589. so, Father." Earl, it " With you, is a good trait carried, ETHELRED PRESTON. perhap
590. true, in in his —a saying, of course, many cases— no man a is ' is good judge ow
591. a saying, of course, many cases— no man a is ' is good judge own I cause.' " "Y
592. course, many cases— no man a is ' is good judge own I cause.' " "Yes, Father; out
593. es— no man a is ' is good judge own I cause.' " "Yes, Father; out. I am I beginning
594. t of over, More- with the narrowness of judgment which years and experience alone can re
595. narrowness of judgment which years and experience alone can remove, Earl did not even ima
596. did not even imagine that there was any other side, any other stand-point than venera
597. gine that there was any other side, any other stand-point than venerable Father, his
598. upply the omissions of an honest though one-sided statement. "Well, Earl," he said,
599. hing far more serious I the question of religion. am a 1 62 ETHELRED PRESTON. I feel Lut
600. ch I made to my mother, to hold my con- religion. But then, on the other hand, worrying
601. hold my con- religion. But then, on the other hand, worrying my science is me a great
602. ut then, on the other hand, worrying my science is me a great deal, and insists Just th
603. must become a Catholic. ago, made up my mind for good — at least, so I thought the
604. me a Catholic. ago, made up my mind for good — at least, so I thought then —neve
605. joining the I Catholic Church. to that time, had been I doubting, and didn't know m
606. been I doubting, and didn't know my own mind. it did not feel quite sure at that tim
607. ind. it did not feel quite sure at that time that was my But duty to become a Cathol
608. quite sure at that time that was my But duty to become a Catholic since then every j
609. ; I only doubted. doubt I had as to my duty to ; Church has been removed and the no
610. Church has been removed and the now the one thing that holds I me back is promise w
611. h made to my mother when she was on her death-bed/' " Just a moment ago, Earl, you sa
612. arl, you said that you had made up your mind never again to consider the claims of t
613. atholic. me so himself in very emphatic language." is "He not a Catholic, Father; call h
614. no more a Protestant, I as I understand religion, than real am a Jew. A Protestant is en
615. a fool." "But how a the name of common sense did boy whom you consider a fool conver
616. ather, Ever since Fve been to Fve had a chance go with the nicest and best I boys one
617. ance go with the nicest and best I boys one would want to meet with. don't mean boy
618. ETHELRED PRESTON. At where there are so many good fellows of that kind have either c
619. RED PRESTON. At where there are so many good fellows of that kind have either change
620. , it was easy ; for me in I a way to be good here company. and it is until lately an
621. something else was necessary besides I good have to fight against myself, too; ! a
622. now and it find harder and harder to be good, that if I seems to I me were to begin
623. your coming going to turn out, bad, my opinion that you are in all probability, either
624. ll probability, either a very or a very good man. Yes, Earl is ; I firmly believe th
625. obability, either a very or a very good man. Yes, Earl is ; I firmly believe that f
626. Father Noland laughed When an everyday man brings a watch to the is watchmaker, an
627. ometimes a great deal more. allegory ?" man You can tell f take the "Yes, Father; b
628. he "Yes, Father; but I didn't think any one knew what you said about me except God.
629. one knew what you said about me except God. In Now fact, I didn't know it myself t
630. d rough and uncouth for himself, is any one here can see oi it, without being told
631. is any one here can see oi it, without being told that Ethelred to get such is not a
632. e for his mother a lady. is But besides being rude and boorish, he vile things. a bad
633. a bad boy. He says wicked and He has no sense of honesty. He 1 66 ETHELRED PRESTO^ An
634. t think that I so low, with my mother's memory and my I if college training upon me, i
635. ege training upon me, it as to lose all sense of decency. that that trol But, then, d
636. e surface of things where people of the world generally stay, and you are trying to l
637. re trying to look at your position from God's standpoint. does not look at the mann
638. ok at the manners of a as at his heart. man so God much He judges boors and gentlem
639. he manners of a as at his heart. man so God much He judges boors and gentlemen disp
640. were once to go wrong, should be in the same class as Ethelred, no matter how us^ di
641. ld be in the same class as Ethelred, no matter how us^ different we should appear to p
642. 6j My mothet I me it. a great horror of sin, and everything have heard here has hel
643. has seemed impossi- ble for me to do my duty, to do right. till day it has grown har
644. imes, too, has seemed to I quered, that time there is am conhave fallen into sin. An
645. at time there is am conhave fallen into sin. And all the Ethelred, poor fellow, bef
646. nt of self-control and with ugliness of sin to scare all the me at the prospect c:
647. the fact that he a bad is boy " ? "That one of the reasons, Father; but the is othe
648. one of the reasons, Father; but the is other reason, and perhaps the principal reaso
649. c? " "Yes, sir." "And " No, there is no one in authority over you to object to your
650. other heaven." think she was a saint of God." " Father, " So do I. my dear boy. Did
651. lf. light. it What you need your heart, God you, I is If you prepare I will give to
652. r heart, God you, I is If you prepare I will give to you. can help Earl, believe, to
653. ur " I'd rather not, sir." it "Exactly; will be a humiliation for you; and God gives
654. tly; will be a humiliation for you; and God gives light to those who humble themsel
655. ves. But you must do at it ; it is your duty. a Look the circumstances for moment. b
656. did not know the troubled and restless state it you were his in. He was quite right
657. his in. He was quite right in thinking duty to call you to account." sir." " Perhap
658. tion in bad part." " But he was wrong, sin" "That God can is, Earl, he was not hea
659. d part." " But he was wrong, sin" "That God can is, Earl, he was not heart. infalli
660. rranted. He acted according to his best judgment, whereas your conduct was dictated by p
661. ashamed of myself." "And There is your duty is to apologize and explain. no doubt i
662. apologize and explain. no doubt in the matter. Think, Earl, of your mother in I heave
663. eart in you can fancy her answering but one way. will I And your to your mother als
664. ou can fancy her answering but one way. will I And your to your mother also, you go
665. hat does she wish you to do her present knowledge to — how does she wish you keep the p
666. mised be true to your ETHELRED PRESTON. religion. 171 What '* is your take religion it ?
667. TON. religion. 171 What '* is your take religion it ? By the way, Earl, you have, I for
668. n; however, on a question so important, one should be contented with nothing less t
669. so it would be go and well to look the matter up. pray. Now, Earl, And remember, my i
670. her €t heaven is praying with you." I will Thank you very much, Father; I follow y
671. e as well as that I can. It seems to me Good-bye, now begin to see my way. Father."
672. efore a painting of the After a little, Good Shep- herd. he deliberately arose, and
673. of the Immaculate Mother. For the first time in his life Earl love found himself rai
674. ulate Mother. For the first time in his life Earl love found himself raising his tro
675. er. For the first time in his life Earl love found himself raising his troubled hear
676. egged and he him not to speak about the matter at I like all, has promised. him better
677. uct, felt that I had laid myin- open to being misunderstood, and that stead of being
678. being misunderstood, and that stead of being too hard he had been too easy on me." "
679. . "I haven't done much and it apolo- my life, doesn't seem to I come talk Last eveni
680. d prayed, and got it prayed Blessed for courage. And ; I I I from the Virgin. And now a
681. in. And now and have to go and pray for one more thing to her again." 'm going to p
682. is, "said Eddie. can guess There's only one thing I'd like to suggest." "What is th
683. ll but for their laughing and giggling, one could see that in the hearts of each we
684. ch were a great happi- ness and a great love. "Maybe I'll need you, Eddie. it I don'
685. room and come suddenly upon two boys. ; One was Ethelred Willie the other a very sm
686. two boys. ; One was Ethelred Willie the other a very small boy, Willie Reardon by nam
687. t my pocket-money. bought the chain the same way, — for twenty cents; but on Tuesd
688. store, and the way the pies went ? And being a Sun- day — five days since the fell
689. see him of at once, and him a piece my mind." said Eddie, "No you don't, Earl," cat
690. ked over. think see a way of fixing the matter without any trouble. will There's no us
691. fixing the matter without any trouble. will There's no use well. in fighting when i
692. ides, you'll lose money. Just leave the matter to find me and Earl and Roger, and you'
693. Roger, and you'll turn that everything will out all right. Now, you'll keep quiet,
694. and even after door had closed them any one passing along the corridor could hear n
695. rer of Henryton College, was a hale old man with a clear eye and a venerable face.
696. h a clear eye and a venerable face. his life long with boys; He self, had been deali
697. he could sympathize with wild boys, and being a man of tender heart and generous sent
698. sympathize with wild boys, and being a man of tender heart and generous senti- men
699. t with v/hom he came into contact. Only one charge had ever been lodged against the
700. l old Father; he was too lenient in his judgment. If God could err, it would be on the s
701. he was too lenient in his judgment. If God could err, it would be on the side of l
702. d stealthily from Farwell's hand to the other's, and he felt almost sure that some- t
703. two chums. " There Earl. ( would be no sense first running away after that attempt o
704. nd now why should in he want to run the matter." 14 again There's no sense If you go t
705. to run the matter." 14 again There's no sense If you go to reasoning about " But all
706. 14 again There's no sense If you go to reasoning about " But all it, you have me," answe
707. have me," answered Ed. going to go, the same, he's —and soon too. He has been getr
708. e house-tops." it," " is If there's any one knows added Earl, f< it Farwell. He's a
709. to much longer, I should lose my class- Good-night, boys. Just try to keep to-morrow
710. yard took part in that scampering, each one endeavoring to get a position nearest t
711. ll And what do day?" It's you boys want time of the Tuesday morning, Father," exclai
712. ces, none of you extrava- gant boys get one cent of pocket-money this morning." And
713. his coat. tense excitement. He was in a state of in- "Hey there! other small You fell
714. t. He was in a state of in- "Hey there! other small You fellows don't get out this fi
715. leven of the foot-ball association to a man? " ETHELRED PRESTON. " Yes; and These I
716. STON. " Yes; and These I I S3 catch the idea, too. — Darling," much snarled if he
717. were eleven pairs of eyes sparkling as one. " Line up," with clenched yelled Peter
718. rless tackier ; and fear- the secret of good tackling. In an instant the two were le
719. furious Darling. cried "Are you hurt?" one of Ethelred's arms. let Devereux, catch
720. me dust you,*' said Roger, catching the other. "We'll all dust you," put in a third;
721. xt moment It's every boy had somehow or other got back into the yard. 11 too bad, Dar
722. ing his arm with Ethelred 's, while the other left students, in obedience to a wink f
723. fty cents." " Do you know how much each one owes you? " You just bet I do. Here." E
724. st I can't arrange take this along, and will do the best I can for you." "Midgets ah
725. e midg- 1 86 ETHELRED PRESTON. to a ets man came will flocking about Devereux. They
726. 86 ETHELRED PRESTON. to a ets man came will flocking about Devereux. They * scented
727. Preston right now in the play-room. All other boys will keep out." At i a run the mid
728. ht now in the play-room. All other boys will keep out." At i a run the midgets is ma
729. RESTON*. is 187 —Vincent Meade a soft one. He has money, and it's easy to get it
730. 's so," "Well, said Peter. there's only one course serious. left for you." The midg
731. and then going around, gathered " Boys, will in the small change from those who had
732. und, gathered " Boys, will in the small change from those who had any. in all," said "
733. who owe the Darling cents, fifty cents will satisfy by paying four and those who ow
734. li At that rate I find that your debts will be paid off for thirty-six cents." "And
735. ." "And cents ? what'll you do with the other four " asked Johnnie Martin, a serious
736. more let " Not exactly; only don't joke will on to him or the should pay his be spoi
737. e delighted, too that now saw now, if a good joke was on foot. " I shall you have no
738. at. take it; it's But you've got to the law." "Get out!" squawked Ethelred. " You w
739. w." "Get out!" squawked Ethelred. " You will notice that we are the money." out. Her
740. the money." out. Here's "I'll not take one cent," howled Ethelred; and to the asto
741. ed Ethelred; and to the astonishment of many, his face began After to twitch as thou
742. lowed in full. There was no net gain of one dollar and thirty cents. He ; received
743. lad insincerity, the its "you deserve a good trouncing, every one of you." "That's l
744. ts "you deserve a good trouncing, every one of you." "That's ly, so, Father," said
745. ather," said Peter Lane sweet- catching one end of Father Harter's cincture, while
746. ncture, while Johnny Martin fondled the other end. Father Harter's face twitched. It
747. ay get along the best way you can " for one week." O I Father!" There were eleven v
748. what I say. You boys have got to learn sense. There now, you can go." the full-back
749. ou tried. " Get out hear of here, every one of you. Do you me ? Get out in at once.
750. . Do you me ? Get out in at once." This time there was a twinkle Father Harter's eye
751. t's have our twenty-five cents just the same as though nothing had happened," pursue
752. gets departed smiling and radiant, each one short just five cents of his regular we
753. rs may consider Father Harter as a weak man in dealing with the stu- In this they w
754. n in dealing with the stu- In this they will agree with Peter Lane. "We can do what
755. ther's so-called weakness. for this his good For weakness In mat- was the weakness w
756. ich ters of is strength. conduct and of duty, Father Harter could as he pleased. ben
757. ss calls lips were moulded earnest upon God. What others did with punishment and lo
758. earnest upon God. What others did with punishment and long labor, he did without effort.
759. hat others did with punishment and long labor, he did without effort. What others utt
760. raying almost certain that It it was my duty to do so. But thought would not hurt Fa
761. oned while I was a baby to see to my It being baptized by a after Lutheran clergyman.
762. est later on, it but for some reason or other appears that he I I neglected doing so.
763. h a clean record. have tried to be a it good boy, but I have missed sometimes ; and
764. een since. on her conscience ever says, being a Catholic, My father, she wanted me to
765. er that he would see intended to at the time, but he kept it He on putting done. off
766. me to promise to be true to do, that my religion. She knows my religion is the religion.
767. e to do, that my religion. She knows my religion is the religion." have now, and I "You
768. religion. She knows my religion is the religion." have now, and I "You answered the tha
769. arl. Your mother's wish was to the true religion, you should be true and were she to app
770. e better to-day, I I were but want some time but I to get ready. am happy now; know
771. eady. am happy now; know that to-morrow life." will be the happiest day of my Father
772. m happy now; know that to-morrow life." will be the happiest day of my Father Noland
773. s point for several " Earl, next Friday will be the first Friday of the month, the d
774. ur Communion till then. To morrow for I will baptize you after Mass, and then get re
775. are your heart the day better." "And my life," that will be another red-letter said
776. rt the day better." "And my life," that will be another red-letter said Earl. in "Ye
777. "Yes; I like the plan. Fve always had a love for the Sacred Heart devotion, and besi
778. ETHELRED PRE S TON, 1 99 baptism, that will never be matter for absoluticm. Earl lo
779. S TON, 1 99 baptism, that will never be matter for absoluticm. Earl looked still it ha
780. . so easy for tell " That makes course, life; I me," he all said. (t Of was willing
781. n Very quickly the news iound, and went many warm and loving hearts rejoiced that th
782. ng more ? "Yes; well that a great deal. One of the little little boys heard the Dar
783. that he saw way clear to getting away. Other fellows saw Ethel- red steal out into M
784. Yes; there's scarcely a doubt about the matter. He'll not leave before recess after se
785. y go sure " ? "Yes," and all he'll this time, bet anything he'll not I come back. to
786. he'll not I come back. to have But the same think we'll manage some fun." " How, Ed
787. IN WHICH THE DARLING RUNS XVII. AWAY IN GOOD EARNEST; the "13 ECESS, " At announced
788. clear, the owner of the small eyes, no other than Ethelred Preston, awoke to sudden
789. he coat 202 ETHELRED PRESTON, He had no particular grudge against but Earl's coat was the
790. and he chose out malice. Earl it ; as a matter of business. Satisfied that under the l
791. Satisfied that under the limitations of time and place he had done his best, Ethelre
792. had done his best, Ethelred threw open one of the windows on the side opposite the
793. und and leaped out. Pausing for a short time to assure himself that there was no one
794. ime to assure himself that there was no one near, he made his way under the long sh
795. o come, upon low groan. Was odd, all it imagination ? He could hear his heart- beats now, a
796. No felt sure that it was his disturbed imagination. this one ever frequented road except t
797. it was his disturbed imagination. this one ever frequented road except the student
798. in his hands; was " Your money or your life ! " At the words uttered in a low, gutt
799. d pointed fell. like statues, each with one hand upon the pistol hip, at and the ot
800. ne hand upon the pistol hip, at and the other holding a the unhappy youth. No don t w
801. nder he "Get ;;p, and as vou value your life, ETHELRED PRESTON. 205 open your mouth/
802. PRESTON. 205 open your mouth/* came the same unnatural voice. Ethelred arose, and st
803. gures continued to bear themselves like one who had spoken came forward, valise, ca
804. rt that he breathed heavily, and wished one of those figures would move or cough th
805. or Ethelred's pockets well-stored. were many and of them were The collection made a
806. n his vest. Stepping he re- turned with other clothes upon his arm. These he handed t
807. derstood the leader's vest words, meant death. slipped from his clasp, while fresh dr
808. ers, and placing the vest and coat upon one of the nerveless arms, he slipped his h
809. nd Count twenty But ; then run for your life, don't dare open your mouth till you ha
810. ng explosion which winged speed. In the time that it him takes to nar- ETHELRED PRES
811. the knickerbocker 208 ETHELRED PRESTON, life. period of fact that They were radiantl
812. light which he had received was a very punishment. And then the romance of the thing! Pis
813. about and laughed over till examination time, and recalled and laughed over in matur
814. ed and laughed over in maturer years as one of the most interesting experiences of
815. nteresting experiences of their college life. " Wasn't that 'giant fire-cracker a su
816. ecstatically. " But wasn't us out, M it good of Father Howard to *' let continued Ed
817. ight prayers. I gave him all my word of honor that we this would behave right and not
818. into his room and placed upon his desk one large tightly-packed valise and any num
819. ay be Si Ethelred's, but we didn't have time to find out." " Ethelred's! " repeated
820. hink he's on the train by to bring this time, in an old overcoat, and with just abou
821. rcoat, and with just about money enough mind taking him home. We it didn't everythin
822. that," said the *io ETHELRED PRESTON. I vice-president at the end of the recital, "
823. sleep. You have who own all and done a good deed, too, out is To-morrow I shall try
824. hat night, boys; unclaimed to Ethelred. Good I am very much obliged to you indeed."
825. ccasion. He was mistaken. As the sequel will show, Father Howard was mistaken too. E
826. the Catholic Church. At his request, no one was present with the exception of Eddie
827. sacramental words, Earl, realizing the beauty of the garment his self invisible put u
828. the garment his self invisible put upon soul, and the sweet union between him- and t
829. restrain his tears. his was the second time since that entering college Devereux ha
830. eter Lane. The flowers sit are from the other fellows here, and just in." down and pi
831. ast. but finally settled They talked of many things, upon the departed left it. Darl
832. ince that applying for a burial permit. time everything has been on the go." "Very m
833. o lament her flight in vain, And wonder will she ever come again.' ' "And then, Earl
834. n, Mr. Gade's verses are well worthy of being treasured. Probably, the older you grow
835. bably, the older you grow, the more you will appreciate them." " I believe you, its
836. l sorry for; it's to. But first there's one thing the time since I've been in here
837. t's to. But first there's one thing the time since I've been in here that I was ever
838. ed, I hear," said Roger. " " I feel bad will for his poor mother," said Earl. The bo
839. have my I overcoat too ? I lent him the other things, and taking them. take But am no
840. came knife across said who fork. had no sense of gratitude Haines, putting at all," R
841. s and he went with him of him. when the other boys fought shy last The thing in retur
842. al of the selfishness and ingratiis the world," said Father Noland, " for to be accou
843. for money-getting. People who allow the love of money to grow ETHELRED upon them, so
844. thing else. PRESTON'. 21} to lose their love for Few boys have such a passion for ga
845. Is 219 listeners began to look at each other with puzzled faces. he to be arrested,
846. es ago, me between his laughs, that the man at the door brought the president of th
847. is secretary to telephone for a police- man." There was a sigh of relief from the a
848. s services." " O-o-o-oh! " This was but one of the many 220 ETHELRED PRESTON. of ex
849. " " O-o-o-oh! " This was but one of the many 220 ETHELRED PRESTON. of expressions as
850. ures as open-mouthed crowd of petrified one seldom comes on in this world of consta
851. f petrified one seldom comes on in this world of constant surprises. He was dress, a
852. e. I don't nicknames." I'll tell " Very good; now will do. If you what we boys you e
853. nicknames." I'll tell " Very good; now will do. If you what we boys you explain to
854. lred Preston, and how it comes that the other Ethelred Preston will agree to so, is n
855. t comes that the other Ethelred Preston will agree to so, is not you, we boys drop y
856. Ethelred. " I shall tell my story with pleasure, if Father Howard it has no objections.
857. ther Howard it has no objections." " It will be a pleasure to me to hear from your l
858. d it has no objections." " It will be a pleasure to me to hear from your lips, Ethelred.
859. e points, pieced into his in narrative, will be set down the following chapters* ETH
860. ELRED PRESTON* 22$ CHAPTER WHY ETHELRED TIME. XX. FAILED TO kEACH HENRYTON M DUE whe
861. ty but modest the boy's costume, on the other hand, was picturesque and much out of t
862. wards the He was clearly in a pet. From time quited so to time she gazed at him with
863. learly in a pet. From time quited so to time she gazed at him with that pathetic loo
864. look in which a often expresses mothers love unreitself- — but the boy gave her no
865. himself, soft- He looked up and saw the love shining other face. Mamma," he cried, "
866. - He looked up and saw the love shining other face. Mamma," he cried, "please take me
867. d ladies' waiting-room; " your delicate constitution could not endure the hardships of a tri
868. far know, my darling, that I shall miss will you more than you miss me. Try, dear, t
869. re, and from afar the sacred and heroic love which mothers have for their little one
870. ess of grief. bow our heads before this love- A moment I passed in silence. Then Eth
871. r. all Catholics." " Yes; but there are many good Catholics, I have known several my
872. l Catholics." " Yes; but there are many good Catholics, I have known several myself.
873. n I College so very well conducted. met one of their boys last summer when little I
874. I feel to the college sure, dear, that will like where he attending; and you only p
875. r, " can't bear to leave Forgetting the time and place, Mrs. Preston threw her arms
876. eck, and mother and son indulged in a " good cry." 226 ETHELRED PRESTON, first Ethel
877. ures of her boy, as though for the last time. There was a and to slight it, lump in
878. gh-drops, dear ?" " Yes, mamma." " Take one at once; the early is morning I air is
879. d not quite done. put a bottle of cough-medicine in your trunk; be sure and take it regu
880. ularly, my darling. Oh, dear! how shall time flies —only five minutes more, and we
881. and on the and be sure to keep your You will reach Henryton at nine o'clock this dea
882. on cakes and candies on the way, or you will make yourself sick." Mrs. Preston went
883. ond mother, fearing neglect some of her many the ear of the conductor. that Ethelred
884. her requests. baby" in the small boy's sense of the word, ind being a baby, course f
885. the small boy's sense of the word, ind being a baby, course far he resented his moth
886. all boy's burning ears. Ethelred was at one and Fifteen the same time furious and f
887. rs. Ethelred was at one and Fifteen the same time furious and frightened. minutes ha
888. thelred was at one and Fifteen the same time furious and frightened. minutes had pas
889. ! ['ve *em and every age. Here's a pair will galluses." you. Just look at them And w
890. u going to *' " ? Henryton all College. life," I've been going to school my continue
891. oarding college." " I wish I I had your chance," said the peddler. seventeen years old
892. all no schoolin'. and things of it." my life pretty near, and I'm tired " I'd much r
893. ELRED PRESTON. ance. 231 But that young man's sense of humor was not disturbed in t
894. PRESTON. ance. 231 But that young man's sense of humor was not disturbed in the least
895. t a boardis like. ing-school Suppose we change places/ 1 " Oh, no." " So you didn't me
896. . You were just a-blowing. But we can't change places Besides, without being found out
897. we can't change places Besides, without being found out. even if I it didn't care abo
898. o that you at a boarding-school in your life P " "Yes." " Then the people who teach
899. ETHELRED PRESTON. " No; I 233 heard of one boy, Earl Meriwether, But I never saw o
900. e boy, Earl Meriwether, But I never saw one of them yet." " Well, then, why couldn'
901. uldn't I go on place. Little in you* No one would know the difference/' Ethelred ha
902. w the difference/' Ethelred had not the courage to say that such an exchange would be w
903. ice of Ethelred's shoes, and of various other articles. to He offered incidentally bu
904. fine show to learn what a peddler's for life is. It will be lots of fun you; and I'l
905. learn what a peddler's for life is. It will be lots of fun you; and I'll is have a
906. be lots of fun you; and I'll is have a chance to see worked. I'll how a boarding-scho
907. red could not refrain from showing some pleasure at this last inducement. " And then," i
908. inued the enterprising Packy, " college will be such a joke. You come to on Saturday
909. m, they'll think you're awful smart. It will be a great joke." I " That's like so; b
910. and you are I afraid, and just dare you change places with me little for two days. Ah,
911. at I'm not afraid," cried Ethelred, " I will change places with you. There ! You pla
912. m not afraid," cried Ethelred, " I will change places with you. There ! You place: thi
913. ve the suspenders that are over and the other traps with the my uncle and sales, mone
914. go to school for two days ? There's no sense in that." " Yes, there is; I want to ge
915. hat." " Yes, there is; I want to get an idea it is of what like." his profit out of
916. He hung over Ethelred for rather a long time, tugging here, pulling there. Two hours
917. ee dollars' worth of his goods. By this time the village youth had discovered him. t
918. e complex attire. " We've just come out one. 4 < of a bandbox/' said Jest look at t
919. red but much stouter. " I'll do it with one hand tied behind my back," asserted thi
920. my " " I have been to school, ma'am, a good deal." thought so; your manners are not
921. o; your manners are not what calling. I one would expect of a person of your Where
922. nced that he did not wish to enter into life. it the question of his past " Yes, chi
923. little it before, but you are a boy, a good all little boy, and I can see behind a
924. e there I is something sad in your past life and won't ask you anything about it." "
925. . This road past your " it for full two Good-bye.'* The kind little lady, in motherl
926. write to your name and given all me and God but, to tell me about yourself. You hav
927. ht hour. ered his benefits upon me —a good husband, true friends, education, means
928. pon me —a good husband, true friends, education, means; my dear, the little boy of mine
929. the pack was heavy moreover, he was of life. unaccustomed to all, it this manner Wo
930. ing about not a sharp, but a dull, dead pain. He looked about him. There w as not a
931. ered him. Had he in but known what this change meant, he would have been frightened. d
932. been frightened. danger of freezing to death. The boy was At length after one of the
933. g to death. The boy was At length after one of the weariest, longest life, quarter
934. ngth after one of the weariest, longest life, quarter of an hour in his he came oppo
935. . in great fear of Ethelred stood dogs; many same who are not mammas' darlings share
936. great fear of Ethelred stood dogs; many same who are not mammas' darlings share the
937. ome their —ran his legs refused to do duty. The run promised to be disastrous in i
938. ther, but he did not cry. to act, was a time and act quickly. it Unfastening the pac
939. , and he congratulated himself that the pain had all gone. But how drowsy he was get
940. tremities had become, he exclaimed: "My God! Just in time. The boy is freez- ing to
941. become, he exclaimed: "My God! Just in time. The boy is freez- ing to death." Ethel
942. Just in time. The boy is freez- ing to death." Ethelred did into the man's not hear
943. z- ing to death." Ethelred did into the man's not hear this; he had fallen mass. ar
944. d care- conveying him to the buggy, the man some liquor down his throat, wrapped hi
945. rse with the whip. a blooded horse. The animal was forward with all He sprang speed, a
946. ough he realized he were racing against death. Go on, Prince, go on!" cried the " Go
947. Mrs. Rainey's. Even as they paused, the good woman threw open the door. M Did you fi
948. r presentiment in was correct. was just time to catch the boy before he was frozen."
949. r that followed; but to thanks care and love and sacrifice and prompt medical treatm
950. ry small boy undertook to be a peddler. will Probably he try some other occupation s
951. be a peddler. will Probably he try some other occupation started out bravely yes- whe
952. ost his road and was nearly Mr. Rainey, one of the leadfrozen to death. ing citizen
953. ly Mr. Rainey, one of the leadfrozen to death. ing citizens of Collinsville, picked h
954. RED PRESTON. lad, strangely dressed for will 249 one in his class of life, not be ab
955. ON. lad, strangely dressed for will 249 one in his class of life, not be able to ge
956. ressed for will 249 one in his class of life, not be able to get about for several d
957. eral days; it is and not likely that he will be quite so chip- per when next he take
958. tion risk. was great, but Packy did not mind taking a Before returning to the colleg
959. , affairs, without disclosing fully the state of he entreated him to send him a healt
960. he boy is getting round quite smart and will leave Ranies next wensday. They say he
961. ight, accordingly, after studies on the same evening, with what results the reader a
962. ircumstances of the case, to think that life pained me is you were again." up that w
963. . think awful left When mamma comes she will find me a different boy. sorry for my c
964. ince I've been with you, I've learned a One of the reasons I had going off as a ped
965. inst I believed everything heard/' " No one can blame you for that, Ethelred. ,t "Y
966. glad to see a crucithe Virgin, for they will a picture of make me remember your kind
967. , and for you'll do me; I know you tell will put sorry kindly: and don't forget to h
968. shall write to her this day, Ethelred, will tell her that you are now well, go to c
969. t settled you, ma'am. In a day or so, I will when I down at Henryton, write to I her
970. at Henryton, write to I her myself, and will tell tell her of your kindness; and I h
971. from her home, Mrs. Rainey, as was her custom, said some short prayers to the Blessed
972. exposure. I shall He It looks as may be imagination, but I not rest to* night unless know t
973. " cold. me go. " I'm not that kind of a man, Martha. Cold! Why, I feel as comfortab
974. with the poor first bye." And when boy, one of the things Mrs. Rainey did was to pu
975. city; and Ethelred had said: " Mamma is one and you are two and she" is holding up
976. produced a babel of welcome, while the good old Father stood smiling and undecided.
977. he head of the table; loveliness of his soul his seemed his to shine forth from nobl
978. There was some sort of providence whole matter," said Earl gravely. help thinking of i
979. morning ago, I after Com- munion. Just one week was determined I never to become a
980. d I really thought that should never if change. And do you know, as Ethelred, that you
981. nice fellow and you have a boy in the a good home-training. There isn't yard that ar
982. exterior, and outward is respectability religion often taken for morality and " it " And
983. Father Noland, " in what wondrous ways God brings about His holy will" " So Mamma'
984. wondrous ways God brings about His holy will" " So Mamma's Darling, by coming here,
985. Darling, by coming here, did a heap of good without knowing it," said Roger. M And
986. us!" chimed fact, Devereux. he has done good to almost every- one except himself," s
987. reux. he has done good to almost every- one except himself," said Earl. " What a pi
988. hat may be a lesson. for a Again, he in good company week —and no is one but God k
989. n, he in good company week —and no is one but God knows how much hidden good ETHE
990. good company week —and no is one but God knows how much hidden good ETHELRED PRE
991. no is one but God knows how much hidden good ETHELRED PRESTON. done by good example.
992. h hidden good ETHELRED PRESTON. done by good example. were very kind to him all ; 25
993. ut in* tending Earl. me a great deal of good," said " And you, Jor Ethelred, what ha
994. did wrong by going peddling, froze but God punished me. He nearly my ears off." "
995. shed me. He nearly my ears off." " When God is particularly good, He punishes us sw
996. y ears off." " When God is particularly good, He punishes us swiftly," observed Fath
997. ly," observed Father Harter. " When the punishment comes tripping upon the heels of the fa
998. if was freezing, I in earnest, it think God heard me. And then looks as 260 ETHELRE
999. left remembered, him to choose his own religion. And the within a year, all who were pr
1000.ming a whether had been a prediction or prophecy. [THE END.] PRINTED BV* BENZIGFR BROTHE
1001. W. Washington St. Books not marked net will be sent postpaid on receipt of the Wher
1002.ge. Thus a book advertised at net $1.00 will be sent postpaid on receipt of $1.10. E
1003. Pape* FINGER THE. flections. OF $0.35. GOD, net, $1.75. THE. With re- FOLLOWING SJ
1004. M.A. OF CHRIST, RESCHLEUTER, MANUAL OF THEOLOGY FOR THE LAITY. G'eiermann, C.SS.R. net,
1005.in edition. FUNDAMENTALS OF THE LIGIOUS LIFE. net, $0.50. MASS-SERVER'S net, CARD. P
1006.ASS-SERVER'S net, CARD. Per net, $0.50. MIND, THE. $2 00 Pyne, SJ. FUTURE LIFE, THE.
1007.0.50. MIND, THE. $2 00 Pyne, SJ. FUTURE LIFE, THE. Sasia, NARROW WAY, THE. Geiermann
1008., THE. By a Religious, net, $0.60. TIAN RELIGION. Wilmers, RELIGION HOUR: BOOK ONE. SJ.
1009.us, net, $0.60. TIAN RELIGION. Wilmers, RELIGION HOUR: BOOK ONE. SJ. net, fl$2.50. Hanna
1010. RELIGION. Wilmers, RELIGION HOUR: BOOK ONE. SJ. net, fl$2.50. Hannan, D.D. List, $
1011.HOME VIRTUES, THE. SJ. net, $1.25. HOME WORLD, THE. SJ. Paper, $0.25; Henry, Litt.D.
1012.90. to schools, $0.21. Doyle, RELIGIOUS STATE, THE. Alpkonsus. Lambing. net, $0.47. S
1013.E, net, $0.85. INTRODUCTION TO A DEVOUT LIFE. St. Francis de SIMPLE COURSE OF RESION
1014.ON. Weigand. LAWS OF THE KING. By a SIX ONE-ACT PLAYS. Lord, Religious, net, $0.60.
1015.50. SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND LITTLE FLOWER'S LOVE FOR AGENCIES. Spalding, SJ. net, HER PA
1016.IS AND PRACTICAL $0.20. LITTLE FLOWER'S LOVE FOR APPLICATION. CathreinGettelman. net
1017.net, TEACHER TELLS A STORY: $2.90. BOOK ONE. Hannan, D.D. PEPPER AND SPIRITUAL TRUE
1018.$0.40. DIRECnet, Sloan, WAY OF INTERIOR PEACE. Lehen, SJ. net, $2.25. WHAT THE CHURCH
1019. BLESSED SACRAMENT BOOK. $0.30. *$0.12. LIFE, THE. BREAD OF Lepicier William, net, $
1020.PITOME OF THE PRIESTLY HOLY VIATICUM OF LIFE AS Dever. net, LIFE, AN. Arvisenet-O'Su
1021.LY HOLY VIATICUM OF LIFE AS Dever. net, LIFE, AN. Arvisenet-O'SulliOF DEATH. Krebs.
1022.ver. net, LIFE, AN. Arvisenet-O'SulliOF DEATH. Krebs. net, $0.85. round corners, red
1023.Y IN THE YEAR ON THE O.S.M. net, $1.50. LIFE OF OUR LORD. Vernet, KEEP THE GATE. Wil
1024.USE tail, $0.25. OF THE SECULAR CLERGY. LIFE'S SJ. LESSONS. Garesche, Chaignon, $7.0
1025.in, S.J. net, $0.50. MEDITATIONS ON THE LIFE, THE TEACHING AND THE LITTLE MANUAL OF
1026. net, TION. Paper. *$0.08. MANNA OF THE SOUL. Vest- $0.60. A little Book MORE SHORT
1027.2mo. $0.85. Ob- CHILDREN. Cecilia. net, SOUL. A MOST $0.85. MANNA MANNA Prayer for M
1028.0. BELOVED Garesche, WOMAN, SJ. net, MY GOD AND MY ALL. A OF $1.25. THE THE SOUL. F
1029. MY GOD AND MY ALL. A OF $1.25. THE THE SOUL. F'. Prayer-Book for Children. By Rev.
1030.n Morocco, gold side and edges, retail, Same, $1.25. white leather, retail, $1.50. C
1031.sance. leather. Rev. Edition, X. Im. OF SOUL. MANUAL net, Prayer-Book by Rev. F. X.
1032.TIANS. OF THE OF HOLY MY PRAYER-BOOK. # Happiness in MARY, HELP CHRIS net, Hammer, O.F.M.
1033. McGrath. Cloth, $0.35; imitaMYSTERY OF LOVE, THE. tion leather, $0.75. Lepicier, O.
1034.$1.50. NEW MISSAL FOR EVERY PRISONER OF LOVE. PrayerDAY, THE. in English for Edition
1035.v. John P. Clarke, net, $1.00. RULES OF LIFE FOR THE NEW TESTAMENT AND PASTORnet, SO
1036.$0.85. SACRED HEART BOOK. PrayNOVENA IN HONOR OF er-Book by Father Lasance. SAINT THE
1037.0.85. SPIRIT OF SACRIFICE, THE, AND THE LIFE OF SACRI- $0.35. SPIRITUAL TIONS. edges
1038.NS. edges, $1.90. FICE IN THE RELIGIOUS STATE. Giraud. net, $3.00. Buckler, O.P. CONS
1039. MOST HOLY $2.00. THOUGHTS ON THE GIOUS LIFE. limp, leather, Very RELIIm. net, Lasan
1040.SERIES net, KINGDOM II. COME. WITH S.J. GOD. Moffatt, Moffatt, Moffatt, Father Lasa
1041.ARNING S.J. limp, red edges, $2.00. FOR GOD. $1.50. Wil> La^ stiff THY net, $0.30.
1042.ERIES net, KINGDOM IV. COME. S.J. YOUNG MAN'S Prayer-Book Seal GUIDE, THE, Father c
1043.S.J. VISITS III. ALTAR PRAYERS. : CANON LAW GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF TH
1044.Wapelhorst, half leather, $8.00; Pocket SCIENCE, Edition Garesche, S.J. net, $0.90. TO
1045.esche, S.J. net, $0.90. TO JESUS IN THE THEOLOGY, LITURGY, HOLY SCRIPTURE, PHILOSOPHY, Y
1046. THE THEOLOGY, LITURGY, HOLY SCRIPTURE, PHILOSOPHY, YOUR SOUL'S SALVATION. S.J. net, $0.90
1047.TURGY, HOLY SCRIPTURE, PHILOSOPHY, YOUR SOUL'S SALVATION. S.J. net, $0.90. A: O.F.M.
1048.ping and edges, net, $17.50. Red finest quality morocco, red under gold edges, net, $22
1049.-Spalding, S.J. net, OUTLINES OF JEWISH HISTORY. Gigot, D.D. net, $2.75. OUTLINES OF NE
1050.F NEW TESTA- RITUALE COMPENDIOSUM. MENT HISTORY. Gigot. net, Cloth, net, $1.25; seal, n
1051.O fl$2 75 THE STUDY OF THE OLD PASTORAL THEOLOGY. Stang. net, ff$2.25. TESTAMENT. Gigot.
1052.UAL CONCORDANCE OF THE HOLY SCRIPTURES. LAW. Ayrinhac, S.S. net, $3.00. 14x10 inche
1053.nd Series. net, $2.75. HOMILIES. $2.00. HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC Mannix. net, $1.00. CHU
1054.OF PAnet, $5.50. TRON SAINTS FOR GIRLS. HISTORY OF THE PROTESMannix. net, $1.00. TANT R
1055.. net, $0.85. JOSEPH. Heuser, D.D. net, HISTORY OF THE MASS. $2.75. O'Brien, net, $2.00
1056.n, net, $2.00. IDEALS OF ST. FRANCIS OF LIFE OF ST. MARGARET ASSISI, THE. Felder, O.
1057.der, O.M. MARY ALACOQUE. IllusCap. net, HISTORY, BIOGRAPHY, HAGIOLOGY, TRAVEL CHILD'S L
1058.Y, BIOGRAPHY, HAGIOLOGY, TRAVEL CHILD'S LIFE OF ST. JOAN ILLUSTRATED LIVES OF PAOF A
1059. V. $4.00. trated. Bougaud. net, $1.84. LIFE OF CHRIST. Brennan. Businger- St. Cecil
1060.d bound in 1 volume, cloth, net, $1.00. LIFE OF CHRIST. Cochem. PICTORIAL LIVES OF T
1061.y 400 illustrations and over 600 pages, LIFE OF ST. IGNATIUS LOYnet, $5.00. OLA. Gen
1062., $5.00. OLA. Genelli, S.J. net, $0.56. LIFE OF MADEMOISELLE LE POPULAR LIFE OF ST.
1063. $0.56. LIFE OF MADEMOISELLE LE POPULAR LIFE OF ST. TERESA. L'abbe Josefh. net, GRAS
1064.. L'abbe Josefh. net, GRAS. net, $0.85. LIFE OF THE BLESSED VIR$0.85. GIN'. Rohner.
1065. Half marecco, gilt edges, net, $15.00. LIFE CHRIST. Illustrated. Businger-Mullett.
1066.BERCHMANS. ST. $0.85. S.J. Denet, SHORT LIFE OF CHRIST, A. McDonough. net, $0.15. O.
1067.$1.50. S.J. OLIC YOUTH. By M. nix. Each life E. Manseparately in at- STORY OF THE DI
1068.only in packages containing 5 copies of one title. Told net, $0.60. for Children. S
1069.ch and Polish Teresa; St. Rose of Lima; same prices. VI. JUVENILES FATHER FINN'S BOO
1070. BILL. Mulholland. net, SNOWS. "BUT THY LOVE AND THY THAT OFFICE BOY. GRACE." Finn,
1071.A NEW COMER. THE BEST FOOT FORWARD; AND OTHER STORIES. "BUT THY LOVE AND THY GRACE."
1072.OT FORWARD; AND OTHER STORIES. "BUT THY LOVE AND THY GRACE." CUPID OF CAMPION. THAT
1073.mare. net, FINDING OF TONY. Wagga$0.60. man. net, $1.25. FIVE BIRDS IN A NEST. Dela
1074.E. Finn, SJ. net, pus, S.J. net, $0.85. MAN FROM NOWHERE. Sad* $1.00. HARRY RUSSELX
1075. son. FREDDY $0.85. CARR AND HOSTAGE OF WAR, A. Bonesteel, net, $0.60. HOW THEY WOR
1076.IRLS AND ESPECarnot. net, $0.60. CIALLY ONE. Taggart. net, PLAYWATER PLOT, THE. $0.
1077.UDSON. LIBRARY. CHILDREN QF FALSE GODS. Will Scarlet. net, $2.00. FAUSTULA. Ayscough
1078.OUSE. GRAPES OF THORNS. WaggaONLY ANNE. man. net, $0.85. THE SECRET CITADEL. HEIRES
1079.NUGENT. Clarke, net, $2.00. BACK TQ THE WORLD. BALLADS Poems. HER JOURNEY'S END. Cook
1080.net, $0.85. $0.85. Champol. net, $2.00. GOOD TIME. Ross BOND AND FREE. Connor, net,
1081.$0.85. $0.85. Champol. net, $2.00. GOOD TIME. Ross BOND AND FREE. Connor, net, net,
1082.Clarke, net, $2.00. net, $2.00. BUT THY LOVE AND THY KELLY. Scott. S.J. net, $1.50 F
1083.Earls, SJ. net, $1.50. OF CHILDHOOD. IN GOD'S COUNTRY. Boyton IN GOD'S CIRCUS-RIDER
1084. CHILDHOOD. IN GOD'S COUNTRY. Boyton IN GOD'S CIRCUS-RIDER'S DAUGHTER. LOVE OF BROT
1085.oyton IN GOD'S CIRCUS-RIDER'S DAUGHTER. LOVE OF BROTHERS. HinkBrackel. net, $0.85. C
1086.REEN NO HANDICAP. Taggart. $2.00. NOT A JUDGMENT. Keon $1.65. ONLY ANNE. Clarke. $1.50.
1087.ansbowne. $0.85. Connor, net, net, net, OTHER MISS LISLE. Martin. net, $0.85. OUTLAW
1088., THE. Clarke, net, $2.0®. ROSE OF THE WORLD Martin. net, $0.85. VIOLA HUDSON. Clark
1089.Reid. net, $1.65. ROUND TABLE OF FRENCH WAR MOTHERS. Poems. Garesche, S.J. net, $0.
1090.OF THE HEART. Gray, net, $0.85. TEST OF COURAGE. Ross. $0.50. Clarke, net, $1.50. n o U

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: https://concordances.library.nd.edu/app/