Concordance for The Blakes and Flanagans : a tale, illustrative of Irish in the United States / By Mrs. J. Sadlier.

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1.   gans: A TALE, J llustrative IN of Irish Life THE UNITED STATES. By MRS. J. SADLIER, 
2. . SADLIER, AUTHOR OP ll KEW LIGHTS; OR, LIFE IN GALWAY," " OLD ANT> NEW, ,r "THE CON
3. ILDREN'. THEY ARE WITH THE THEY REST IN PEACE PAST.: , THEY HAVE JOINED THEIR KINDRED
4. JOINED THEIR KINDRED DUST In BUT THEIR MEMORY Holy Ireland. IS GREEN AND FRESH IN MY
5. is story, there is a moral contained in will not read far till and you out. you find
6. fairs, it make a salutary impresis, The world and I believe has the children ever bee
7. ses, believers and unbelievers : of the one true Church, and the children of the wo
8. ne true Church, and the children of the world. It is needless to say that all ; my wr
9. icated The drama of is is to the faith, one grand object the illustration of our ho
10. stories. these in general, and of this one in particular, taken from every day ful
11. s. these in general, and of this one in particular, taken from every day full life. The wo
12. n particular, taken from every day full life. The world around us I have of Blokes a
13. ar, taken from every day full life. The world around us I have of Blokes and Flanagcm
14. y Vl PREFACE. to grouped them so as for form a little sphere of action I could the c
15. to write novels cannot afford to waste time pandering merely to the imagination, or
16. d to waste time pandering merely to the imagination, or fostering that maudlin sentimentali
17. est depends on the workings of passion. One who has Eternity ever in view, cannot w
18. on the workings of passion. One who has Eternity ever in view, cannot write mere love-ta
19. ternity ever in view, cannot write mere love-tales but simple, practical stories emb
20. actical stories embodying grave truths, will be read by many, who would not read pio
21. embodying grave truths, will be read by many, who would not read pious books. Such,
22. e in general well pleased with it. Such being the case, I can confidently send it for
23. t it may he made an instrument — ; of good. Montreal, August, 1855 CONTENTS. Ch«p
24. L — UNCLE . TIM'S PRACTICAL JOKES AND OTHER MATTERS IX. .124 142 THE SOIREE — THE
25. . XII. ..... . — FILIAL ADMONITIONS A FAMILY PARTY AT TIM FLANAGAN'S .... . . . . 16
26. IAGE AND THE PROSPECT OF ANOTHER FILIAL LOVE AMONGST THE DILLONS Xm —AN IRISH FUNE
27. NTS. THE SCHOOL QUESTION TURNS UP AGAIN JUSTICE —RETRIBUTIVE 249 T. XVI THE BROKEN BA
28. HIS POINT OP A DELICATE — REVELATIONS NATURE— EI IZA'S AND HOW SHE SURMOUNTED THEM
29. 00 THE DOUBLE ORDINATION —A . HAPPY . DEATH . — AN .317 UNSEASONABLE VISIT xx. mr
30. 17 UNSEASONABLE VISIT xx. mr. Pearson's idea of conscience —tom reilly's SECRET
31. 'S MARRIAGE XXI. XXII. . EFFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE— MATTERS OF GENERAL IMPORT CONCLUSION
32. l to was simply a thriving comdo in the world," and of its not much ahead sister citi
33. imes are changed since then; the age of progress is hurrying all things onward with a ra
34. hings onward with a rapidity that makes one's head dizzy. It is unfashionable now t
35. eak of the past with regret, is and any one who has the hardihood to do so '* set d
36. years ago, am, making comparisons which many of my a story of New younger readers ma
37. ay deem invidious. if it And yet the be one, is very natural, and perhaps are preci
38. of Flanagan, a real homespun Tipperary man, hot-blooded, blustering, and loud A sp
39. unmistakeable Milesian, real reminding one of friend Wolfe's description of his "
40. the young bride, who then for the first time quitted her father's home by the silver
41. and two daughters all " natives " every one ay Timothy or as he was more generally
42. re Christian —an hb Irishwoman of the good ^ld times. Neither Tim nor THE DRAMATIS
43. the various new-fangled systems of were good, old fashioned Catholics, as theii reli
44. good, old fashioned Catholics, as theii religion; they fathers were before them, and the
45. n was to bring up their children in the same faith. children themselves, they were j
46. tle girls, and two Ellen and Su*an, the one between five and six, and the other fou
47. , the one between five and six, and the other four. Susy was, as might be expected, t
48. s, as might be expected, the pet of the family; and as there seemed no likelihood of a
49. here was not in New York city a happier family, or one more free from guile. Religion
50. t in New York city a happier family, or one more free from guile. Religion was the
51. er family, or one more free from guile. Religion was the sun of their solar system, givi
52. s the sun of their solar system, giving life and warmth tn which the themselves and
53. of a sister who kept a provision Galway man, named Miles Blake, store in the next b
54. next block. The Blakes in their were a good sort of people way, but not by any Both
55. g else; and though they professed to be good Catholics, and were neans so good as th
56. to be good Catholics, and were neans so good as the Flanagans. go considered by many
57. good as the Flanagans. go considered by many people, yet religion was, with them, on
58. gans. go considered by many people, yet religion was, with them, only a secondary object
59. siness !" that it did " Business ! much time or attention was the grand said, a affa
60. , a affair with the Otherstrictlj Biake family — at least the elders of the house. w
61. hools, or convents, or the were, in his opinion, by no means necessary : people could g
62. idn't deny but they did a great deal of good," and as for Catholic schools, he did n
63. ic schools, he did not see what the the State had provided people wanted with them, w
64. provided people wanted with them, when good schooling still, for their children, fr
65. expense. Yet Miles was always on pretty good terms with his priest, and complied, on
66. who had been born but two remaining the other a girl, ; to them, Miles Blake and latt
67. to them, Miles Blake and latter had and one a boy, of fourteen or of twelve. it The
68. aps it were better she had, but such an idea never occurred to her doting parents, w
69. ourse, as THE DRAMATIS PERSONiE. clouds will overshadow dispelled, all 13 things hum
70. e dextrous manoeuvre on or, the part of good Mrs. contrition from Flanagan, perhaps,
71. rs of my story, and given the reader an idea of their distinctive features, I will l
72. n idea of their distinctive features, I will leave them to speak and act for themsel
73. his Tim brought out pretty together, as one might say, and were almost like brother
74. d alike sisters all round. Eliza Blake, being, from her infancy, of a frail and delic
75. om her infancy, of a frail and delicate constitution, was regarded by brothers and cousins,
76. cases, anticipated her faults were not many, and, such as they were, might be chief
77. iefly ascribed to the over- She was, by nature, mild, gentle and affectionate, but sic
78. her over-exacting; still she was a very good little girl, and as for prudence and di
79. was a very good little girl, and as for prudence and discretion, they seemed indulgence
80. ," and was, moreover, the oracle of the family, as a petted child Harry, the brother,
81. amongst his in companions. Harry was a particular favorite with his uncle Flanagan, proba
82. for he's a — ; Sue likely boy, and a good-hearted fellow, with wildness." all his
83. with his school- mates on the score of religion. that There was scarcely a day Harry Bl
84. et iuto some " scrape," defend- ing his religion. these His father was well pleased to h
85. hat he would sooner or later " cram the truth down their throats that he would; he'd
86. ould; he'd — teach them to vilify his religion, and blacken poor old Ireland!" And why
87. hey were, and brought up by a mother so good pious, ? were never seen or heard fight
88. r heard fighting calumniated. for their religion Simply because they were not exposed to
89. st Tim Flanagan never school. it," sent one of his : children to a Ward His motto w
90. t, to the as inflexible as her husband. Many and many hot upon it, a time did Miles
91. as inflexible as her husband. Many and many hot upon it, a time did Miles and Tim d
92. r husband. Many and many hot upon it, a time did Miles and Tim discuss thb question;
93. t. Peter's Church. had two departments, one the for boys, the other for skirls —t
94. two departments, one the for boys, the other for skirls —the former taught by a ce
95. certain Mr. Lanigan, a fine specimen of good old it. Catholic teacher; the latter un
96. o or largest. three, and St. And a very good school many a valued citizen did it bri
97. . three, and St. And a very good school many a valued citizen did it bring up for a
98. t. And a very good school many a valued citizen did it bring up for a tew of the boys w
99. the feet" their industry was about the Many and was. the State, and not of worthy M
100. ndustry was about the Many and was. the State, and not of worthy Mr. in society Lanig
101. n society Lanigan have since attained a good position business education there recei
102. since attained a good position business education there received. by and good conduct, no
103. siness education there received. by and good conduct, not to speak of the sound The
104. neither could succeed in convincing the other, although Miles had been known to admit
105. they seemed to pay but attention to the matter, gradually sank into their Eliza Blake
106. of her age could adopt them, but first time, to tell her father that she would iuac
107. s not to is The school you're at a very good one, Eliza, are pleased with have been
108. to is The school you're at a very good one, Eliza, are pleased with have been as f
109. s squab- bling and fighting ?" she said one after laying day to her husband, eye-br
110. what it is, and I wonder at a sensible man like in these wild pranks." Why, man to
111. le man like in these wild pranks." Why, man to run alive, woman, what would you hav
112. ld likfl Isn't it all on account of his religion that they're down on him, and I'm sure
113. :hem, when they get a-running down his religion ?" THE DRAMATIS PERSONJB ** 11 Well, no
114. re ? They haven't to stand up for their religion, like poor Harry.*' 11 And maybe they'r
115. they it all their saves their mother 11 many Ay, but then, Home trouble to have Harr
116. earn to defend his faith. The Flanagans will grow up regular nincompoops not a word
117. eads, and no more spunk in them than so many kittens. I like to see a fellow ready w
118. dy with a word or a blow to keep up his religion, and I tell you once for all that there
119. u once for all that there's no place so good as a Protestant school, my lad gives me
120. ht proper to affect a grave demeanor. " Good luck to the work," said he, " for I see
121. eat brag of how they gave Harry Blake a good he'll trouncing this morning, and one,
122. good he'll trouncing this morning, and one, they think, that get over for a while.
123. h his roguish smile. of these days that same's a comfort, anyhow," put in Tim, " He'
124. in Tim, " He'll be a first-rate buffer one — ay, faith ! neither Dan Donelly if
125. " but so long as the boy fights for his religion and the honor of old Ireland, he may fi
126. the boy fights for his religion and the honor of old Ireland, he may fight away and w
127. s all very well while he fights for his religion, but, just keep him at the same school
128. his religion, but, just keep him at the same school you'll see he'll for three or fo
129. im Flanagan, but you're enough to set a man crazy. It's well come up with you to ta
130. nt did you ever know a turn-coat in the family tell me that now ?" by that, — — "
131. now ?" by that, — — " "I What tell matter whether I did or not," retorted Tim, pl
132. and that's what I it's they are, don't God knows into the very it, jaws of perditi
133. home-thrust " why, they're not for any religion for all religions, in particular — th
134. for any religion for all religions, in particular — they're and you both kuow that as w
135. t as well as I do." 11 " they're for no religion " Why, what do you Begging your pardon,
136. gions, as you say, is, in fact, for no religion, because no particular religion can be
137. s, in fact, for no religion, because no particular religion can be taught without giving o
138. for no religion, because no particular religion can be taught without giving offence to
139. aid Miles, exul- not the place to learn religion, let the parents teach that at home, an
140. eir father in like manner, to make them good Catholics." All right, Mary, all right,
141. ut ? do the all Catholic parents do the same do you think all Catholic children atte
142. ay ? to catechism or do they all get as good teachings at home, and see as good exam
143. t as good teachings at home, and see as good example befcre thein as yours do ? and"
144. far advanc- ed in their learning as any other boy and girl we know of the same age, a
145. s any other boy and girl we know of the same age, and as for religion, they're not a
146. irl we know of the same age, and as for religion, they're not a whit be- hind anybody el
147. in the city readier to stand up for his religion than my Harry, and he'd never have been
148. "Then how well if did you and I get. to love our religion so I'm sure we didn't eith
149. well if did you and I get. to love our religion so I'm sure we didn't either of us go t
150. as any in the it's parish, and, for the matter of that, in the few Protestants we same
151. tter of that, in the few Protestants we same parish " hadn't one And we — not one,
152. few Protestants we same parish " hadn't one And we — not one," said Miles, " ther
153. same parish " hadn't one And we — not one," said Miles, " there wasn't one within
154. not one," said Miles, " there wasn't one within miles of us." " Very good, and y
155. wasn't one within miles of us." " Very good, and yet you see you're not a bit colde
156. bit colder or more careless about your religion than fighting for it every day of your
157. than fighting for it every day of your life." different here, as 1 often told if yo
158. the children getting on well with their education, and still remaining good Catholics, I'
159. th their education, and still remaining good Catholics, I'm willing to send them to
160. ol, because I'd be very ungrateful if I good and so kind as to educate our children
161. ur children without meddling with their religion. What do you say, Mary V But Mary was b
162. bother herself" ^rith such debates. the State is so THE DRAMATIS it P T6 R S N A . 21
163. sank into nothing in her eyes. * Well, good-bye," said Tim, rising and taking his h
164. and taking his hat, " I wish you both a good appetite for your dinner, and a better
165. appetite for your dinner, and a better knowledge of what is good for your children. I ho
166. nner, and a better knowledge of what is good for your children. I hope you'll never
167. m, isn't it provoking to see a sensible man, like acting so foolishly ? By my too.
168. if Miles's hands, just as she hadn't as good a right to the children as he has to !
169. ! They're a temptation to me — I vow God u they are ! !" ! for Miles, will be th
170. I vow God u they are ! !" ! for Miles, will be their own as you often say yourself
171. l Tim, the worst ; you're not the •k, man to blame a wife for being submissive, T
172. e not the •k, man to blame a wife for being submissive, Tim ? Sit over, now, and ta
173. to go a-fight- ing as you do ?" " Why, religion, mother, to be sure —don't that, ever
174. mother, to be sure —don't that, every one know his *' and Harry laughed mother di
175. ike. that ?" in a way somehow, and Oh ! religion !" said she, " that's the old story, it
176. r head that you'd show more respect for religion by keeping out of brawls, and trying ?"
177. ouble- some.' which, eh, you know, " is one of the eight beatitudes— Harry what h
178. her, — TH1 TWO SCHOOLS. talking about time, as * 23 the dirty Irish/ and looking a
179. " me all I'll the much if say —you're one of them. be hanged •' I stand Why, Ha
180. stand Why, Harry," ! said the mother, u one would almost think you were ashamed of
181. ept now !" she's spending so much late. time at her prayers that she's sure to be sh
182. other, sharply, you spent a little more time at your prayers if you — did, you wou
183. with your school- mates." " Oh ! never mind, mother, never mind. I'll get reli- gio
184. ates." " Oh ! never mind, mother, never mind. I'll get reli- gion some of these days
185. retty an hour, and it so it near school-time " I guess you'll catch this morning." A
186. le. I'm well pleased to see that you're particular about saying your prayers. to him. Harr
187. ere's no fear of me another of those me being sick while I can cat so heartily," and
188. e hei Miles kind parents as to the real state of her health. exchanged glances, and t
189. TWO SCHOOLS. enocgh to bother 25 child one's brains to hear the poor There she has
190. books. lesson, and her geometry and her philosophy lesson, —whatever was and her rhetori
191. losophy lesson, —whatever was and her rhetoric lesson lessons they are, I'm sure I don
192. son why made is to study too hard. What good, I want to know, of with the hard in th
193. es ?" Why, Mary, we want Eliza to get a good educa- we must let her learn such thing
194. " JSonsense, Miles, I'd rather have of religion them taught more whatever I'm sure and
195. r usual cheerfulness reflected from her mind. " Why, Mary, what maggot has bit you t
196. know, woman if dear, that most of those same the call oranches that you're talking C
197. priests wouldn't have them taught four mind easy about that." make 2 26 tJLAKES AND
198. FLANAGANS. But Mary could not make her mind easy further remonstrance, ; her mater-
199. about to make when a cus- tomer coming time, in put an end to the conversation for
200. st to see how it fared with him on that particular morning. The teacher, Mr. Simpson, was
201. Simpson, was a very smooth, sleek-faced man, fair hair, carefully with long, brushe
202. at were continually glancing round from one object to little vain. He another, in a
203. long years of " watching the boys." No one hr-d ever seen Mr. Simpson seen, like t
204. mooth-spoken gentleman had no particlar love for Harry who was, as his mother expres
205. hat personage more trouble than all the other boy§ put together. But Mr. Simpson kne
206. even smoother and more oily than to any one THE TWO SCHOOLS. 27 Accordingly, Mr. Si
207. e ground that Irish-like," fighting for religion was "too and only for Harry Blake!" Thi
208. want, fighting for the Irish and their religion, "Paddies like ti you a'n't Irish a'n't
209. elf?" " Well, now, if you a'n't a queer one! as well as is your father and mother I
210. ave as much right to choose If I any of one else. were you I wouldn't fight for the
211. ame a country you never saw, or for any religion just "tfait till in particular; you cho
212. or for any religion just "tfait till in particular; you choose one for yourself, as a free
213. t "tfait till in particular; you choose one for yourself, as a free-born American o
214. , that brought the blood to Harry'a His sense of humiliation was nowise lessened by c
215. of "Have eaid patience, Mr. Simpson. my good boy, let " Go on, Master me some us hea
216. mean people, the meanest set in all the world ?" And Harry unconsciously imitated Her
217. I said ? And what it, if I did — aVt will." it true what —you the full it. tan'
218. angry passion could have withstood " My good boys," said he, " your are both wrong b
219. ng both wrong" (the boys looked at each other) gion a forbidden theme; in fact, —
220. ywhere wrong, for boys to quarrel about religion, as religion is is only for religion
221. for boys to quarrel about religion, as religion is is only for religion —fall-grown w
222. ut religion, as religion is is only for religion —fall-grown wholly unnecessary — me
223. nnecessary — men it men. At your age, will be time enough for each of you to take
224. ry — men it men. At your age, will be time enough for each of you to take your sta
225. all things left The Great Creator free will, in order that is man to his own he mig
226. eat Creator free will, in order that is man to his own he might choose a religion f
227. hat is man to his own he might choose a religion for himself, but he not in a condition
228. a condition to choose until he reaches man's estate. Behold about is. now, my dear
229. before how silly a thing it is to fight religion, you can know what religion really Samu
230. is to fight religion, you can know what religion really Samuel Herrick, go to your seat,
231. gain hear of you inveighing against any form of worship; even the Roman Church, thou
232. t still professes to wor- ship the true God. Those who belong to her communion, the
233. on, therefore, that, for the future, my will dear Master Herrick, are rather to be p
234. frain from saying, " Sir, don't care my religion is the best it ; I long as I'm able." w
235. best it ; I long as I'm able." what any one says, and I'll stand up for Another tit
236. ys. at 50 14 BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. Your religion, Master Blake ?" said Mr ; Simpson, ; m
237. . if " I don't understand your having a religion it but is you have, you must keep 11 to
238. any? But, sir, you spoke against it my religion," persisted Harry, "and a'n't fair —y
239. an And do you not see the reason, in my good boy said nothing V Simpson his blandest
240. d nothing V Simpson his blandest voice; religion, "I about Master Herrick's have any." "
241. resumed the master, almost the only boy religion, in are the school who makes a fuss abo
242. at the offence. Here you are all on the same footing at home with your parents, you
243. be; but here, mark me, you have only to mind your lessons leave the letter of our re
244. he letter of our regulations, I — — religion out of ; doors. his See, there is your
245. ver hear him brawling or fighting about religion. I tell !' In the words of the ' you, m
246. Trimble (to his assistant), up the for mathematics." So Harry had to take his place in " t
247. e his place in " the first class foi in mathematics," and Soon forgot his honest indignatio
248. gle to keep his place, and get a higher one, if possible. his parallelograms Leavin
249. han his own personal adornment, and, if truth must be told, he was more akin to Domin
250. GANS. all nothing that I have beon that time teaching ' the young idea how to shoot.
251. ave beon that time teaching ' the young idea how to shoot.' Believe : truth in the s
252. the young idea how to shoot.' Believe : truth in the simple old lines * — me there
253. he simple old lines * — me there is a world of 'Tis education forms the is common m
254. lines * — me there is a world of 'Tis education forms the is common mind, Just as the t
255. d of 'Tis education forms the is common mind, Just as the twig bent, the tree's incl
256. y bring it ! even the omnipotent arm of God, to into subjection !" Such were the op
257. ountry of ours ; but they were based on good, sound Catholic doctrine, and will neve
258. d on good, sound Catholic doctrine, and will never go out of fashion while there are
259. the earth true believers, who regard " man's fallen state w as something mofe than
260. ue believers, who regard " man's fallen state w as something mofe than a speculation.
261. nigan dropped his paper, for he was the life and soul of pune totality. THE TWO SCHO
262. pped his paper, for he was the life and soul of pune totality. THE TWO SCHOOLS 11 33
263. . Well, Ned, my fine fellow, what's the matter with yon ?" " My father wants you, sir,
264. Irish paper with you ; he heard you got one yesterday." ; " Yes, Ned, 1 did all. te
265. tisfaction this forenoon, tell you, and one that I know be glad to hear." all The b
266. l work twice as hard after, if it's any good seniors ventured to say, in a coaxing t
267. ssons it — you'll have it before you. Mind, all depends on how you acquit yourselv
268. " Boys, do you know what day to morrow will be ?" Several voices answered, " No, si
269. answered, " No, sir 1" but the greater will number called out : "Oh, 1" yes, sir
270. sir !" " Well, as you have all been if good boys this forenoon, you continue as goo
271. ood boys this forenoon, you continue as good during the afternoon, I purpose giving
272. pose giving you a holiday to-morrow, in honor of our illustrious patron. That is, on
273. . That is, on condition that you in St. will go to mass. o'clock 9 There will be hig
274. in St. will go to mass. o'clock 9 There will be high mass Peter's, at ten and then y
275. chool when you go on the out street Act good Christian boys, remembering that you ar
276. did seem disposed to forget some older one would call him to order with, " Hold "
277. has since written THE TWO SCHOOLS. " I love to look 35 on a scene like Of wild and
278. . For it old, stirs the blood in an old man's veins, And makes To catch his pulses
279. ike them ? What a strange thing is this life of ours, and how imperceptible the tran
280. re still thanks to our divine we on the same level. Here am I, an old man of sixty,
281. we on the same level. Here am I, an old man of sixty, looking forward to the celebr
282. to evening came, the old own domicile.. man paid his promised of Tim Flanagan, whom
283. the room of the Household, " where the family was wont to assemble at meal-times, and
284. n to "climb his knee," claiming, at the same time, the performance of a ?ertain prom
285. "climb his knee," claiming, at the same time, the performance of a ?ertain promise m
286. formance of a ?ertain promise made some time before. "Well, Susan, I really forgot a
287. k, but you'll see I'll have it the next time I oome." 36 BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. Susan
288. r behind " If he was after giving Susan one of dresa- whispered Edward to his broth
289. en he never givea 1 a dressing ' to a#y one that don't deserve it. None of us has e
290. n't deserve it. None of us has ever had one yet." " And I hope we'll be so," respon
291. he young ones. For my part, I think the man's bewitched." " Bewitched !" said Mr. L
292. s bewitched by the in spirit of worldly wisdom. He thinks, common with is many others,
293. rldly wisdom. He thinks, common with is many others, that the temporal interest of h
294. Pro- testant or mixed schools. his own opinion. The poor man Time will show him its is
295. ixed schools. his own opinion. The poor man Time will show him its is welcome to fa
296. schools. his own opinion. The poor man Time will show him its is welcome to fallacy
297. ols. his own opinion. The poor man Time will show him its is welcome to fallacy, bet
298. lcome to fallacy, better than any human reasoning." " late God !" grant that the knowledg
299. etter than any human reasoning." " late God !" grant that the knowledge may not com
300. easoning." " late God !" grant that the knowledge may not come too " said Mrs. Flanagan,
301. protect them I" may the holy Mother of God THE TWO SCHOOLS " 31 V* Can Father Powe
302. Tim hesita- " I have heard Father Power reasoning cased with him, and he'd always manage
303. r. Flanagan ?" " Oh, then, to be sure 1 will It would be a bad day ! if I didn't. Yo
304. . Lanigan, — may !" ! you live to see many 11 returns of the great anniversary Man
305. any 11 returns of the great anniversary Many 1 thanks to you, Mr. Flanagan I wish :
306. s to you, Mr. Flanagan I wish : you the same and allow me to add another good wish m
307. ou the same and allow me to add another good wish may you never have a son a worse C
308. e. than tea or Children, I think ' it's time for you to go Bid Mr. Lanigan good-nigh
309. it's time for you to go Bid Mr. Lanigan good-night.' " The children obeyed, and afte
310. e Irish population of the city was in a state of joyseen hurry- ous, hilarious commot
311. owds towards the place of meeting, each one dressed "in his best," and wearing on h
312. igure of a shamrock and handsome badges many of them were, but poor substitutes, the
313. wild enthusiasm height ; of the Celtic nature was at its every eye flashed, and every
314. atrick's day — the premium. 39 joyous emotion, when suddenly one of the bands struck
315. emium. 39 joyous emotion, when suddenly one of the bands struck up "The Exile of Er
316. ailing music, no sound was to be heard. Memory was busy with most of those present; th
317. , for the moment, gave place to tke and many a sigh was heaved past. sisters Many an
318. nd many a sigh was heaved past. sisters Many and an eye was moistened with tears for
319. es returned, and every foot was beating time tc " Garry Owen na Glora." Such is the
320. ength the procession was formed, and in good order towards St. Patrick's Cathedral,
321. a sermon preached by Dr. Levins, on the life and virtues of St. Patrick. After mass
322. day to the care of his thrifty out " in honor of St. Patrick. but hardly in spirit, f
323. school-classes. of the of There was his mathematics —the pride BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. his
324. ad devoted more study than to ; all his other lessons put together well, yesterday he
325. ay he was at the head, and to-morrow he will have to take his place at the foot of t
326. at the foot of the class, on account of being a day absent, is and, worse than all !
327. m Herrick, And then Hugh Dillon and the other Catholic boys who went to school regard
328. ed to this 1 guess I'd rather be at the mathematics just now, or even hammering Sam Herrick
329. street* we a little muddy, but we don't mind that st. Doesn't it tatrick's day — t
330. s day — the premium. 41 do your heart good, Harry, to see such a turn I'm sure out
331. m sure St. Patrick is worthy of all the honor we can pay him don't you know what he d
332. place again. There, you see, was head I mathematics, second in rhetoric, and third ; in nat
333. see, was head I mathematics, second in rhetoric, and third ; in natural philosophy I'll
334. ond in rhetoric, and third ; in natural philosophy I'll be foot in every one of ; them. wi
335. atural philosophy I'll be foot in every one of ; them. wish they wouldn't keep Patr
336. smiled, while his mother told him to " mind could do poor his own it business, and
337. didn't concern him. you right Harry any good, would be Ned dear, you can't do him an
338. would be Ned dear, you can't do him any good so long as matters stand as they are. B
339. ar ?" said his wife anx- iously, at the same time dropping her own knife and fork it
340. said his wife anx- iously, at the same time dropping her own knife and fork it isn'
341. ean I'm sure if it's my best to make it good." his wife did. It's — ; bad, my "I T
342. Miles Blake say to the stew only what's good. ; you see it's just coming to pass as
343. Now, finest that boy — Harry would be One of the if boys in the city of mean New
344. ! — he'll be a disgrace to us, Nelly, God hasn't said !" " Hut, tut, Tim, what do
345. to say very bad of him yet, and always time enough meet him. to Don't fret morrow w
346. e about him, for you have bid the devil good dene you could to bring Miles to reason
347. ll, Tim, it's him that's accountable to God for him not you. all — If we could ge
348. with our boys he's too much among them other sort that's what's doing the — — mi
349. ant teach—may the Lord save him Never mind, it is, ! 111 Father Power at Miles aga
350. give it up so Having thus relieved his mind by talking over matter, Tim recovered h
351. thus relieved his mind by talking over matter, Tim recovered his natural gaiety and s
352. t up before the children, contained the cause of was pretty evident her joy. Running
353. untie the precious parcel while all the other children gathered eagerly round to see
354. d up before her aunt, whispering at the same time " There's some beautiful picto the
355. before her aunt, whispering at the same time " There's some beautiful picto the chil
356. Miss I Davison, as a reward to find for good conduct. knew you would be pleased you
357. 11 dear, yes, aunty — it has ever so many beautiful pictures." Yes, so I perceive
358. s." Yes, so I perceive. The Beauties of History. Let me see what's the name. That ought
359. see what's the name. That ought to be a good thing. or so.' Have you read any of it,
360. n long like it, it's ago, on account of religion. much so pitiful to read such things, b
361. om her teacher, eh ?" said Tim drily. " Will you me look at it V " There can't come
362. ook at it V " There can't come anything good from — that quarter," said he to hims
363. No. . 2?. T. t March 18—. So far, so good, "Eliza," said her uncle " now let as w
364. lence 46 for BLARES AND FLANAGANS. some time, then suddenly he stopped with an empha
365. ce on the the abominations of the human mind ; its determined hostility to education
366. uman mind ; its determined hostility to education, and, civilization ; consequently, to m
367. Miss Davison morrow. " I'm sure father will be very angry." that he may, I pray And
368. be very angry." that he may, I pray And God I" said Mrs. Flanagan, st. Patrick's da
369. . Patrick's day ; — the premium. this will 41 his with pious fervor eyes ?" " who
370. " " who knows but open " If it does, it will be the lucky book," said Tim; " that's
371. book," said Tim; " that's what neither man nor mortal could do these five years."
372. hese five years." " Well, Tim, you know God has his own good time for doing everyth
373. " " Well, Tim, you know God has his own good time for doing everything. Just go down
374. ell, Tim, you know God has his own good time for doing everything. Just go down your
375. a stay here till you come all back, and mind you don't be long away, for we'll till
376. ere with Eliza and your mother. till Be good children candy " I come back, and to I'
377. n. He I does " make such a Why, sure he time of never says anything to you, Eliza? k
378. ll, no more he don't, aunty to hear any one scolding, lc ; but then I never like fe
379. she gave me the book ; Catholics are so particular about books. She ga\e ^essy McPherson
380. ga\e ^essy McPherson •' ore just the same." " Yes, but Jessy McPherson is, is a P
381. he difference, you see. What 7* answers one, doesn't answer the other." "Why can't
382. What 7* answers one, doesn't answer the other." "Why can't we all be of the same reli
383. the other." "Why can't we all be of the same religion, aunty 48 said Eliza BLAKES AN
384. ther." "Why can't we all be of the same religion, aunty 48 said Eliza BLAKES AND FLANAGA
385. ll I know is, that we're not all of the same and it, as we have the true if religion
386. the same and it, as we have the true if religion, we must can't lose try and keep with G
387. n, we must can't lose try and keep with God's help." " Well, but easy, 1 guess. we
388. Edward, stoutly, before his mother had time to answer " it was eating the forbidden
389. id ; ; ; gran says that a Protestant is one who rebels against the lawful authority
390. that our parents are placed over us by God to guide and direct us." " Well, but ab
391. Flanagan sauntered into his brother-in-law'f — — the st. itore, Patrick's day
392. in," said he, " you'll find Mary gpare time for. inside." A Mrs. Blake was just set
393. table for supper, and Harry was sitting one side learning his lessons by the light
394. de learning his lessons by the light of one of those glass oil-lamps, so common in
395. his you're at now ?" " Bible and Gospel History, uncle." 11 Humph Bible and Gospel Hist
396. tory, uncle." 11 Humph Bible and Gospel History ' ! !' very good I suppose ; I don't li
397. ph Bible and Gospel History ' ! !' very good I suppose ; I don't like ; anything abo
398. father from the store 11 You're just in time, Miles," said his wife, " I was going t
399. 's not bad news, either, at the present time, for hungry as a hawk. Let us have some
400. t. Sit over, Tim, and try if they're as good as they look." " Well, I don't care if
401. r it all ?" No, neither of them had had time what sort of a book was it ? "Just wait
402. engage you'll teacher ?" "I'll not say one word against it, Miles, not a word. Let
403. right, but thought she would " bide her time " to put in a word. " Now for it," said
404. Miles began to read aloud, and for some time no other comment than an occasional Geo
405. gan to read aloud, and for some time no other comment than an occasional George 1" By
406. " said Miles, " that was surely a great time, and old Harry the Eighth was a great f
407. t 44 Ward says in his Cantos With every vice they stock'd the nation To fit it for a
408. I'll tell Miss Davison so with my own I will, by George !" " Yes," said Tim, " you'l
409. e ways of killing a dog than self. What good will it do for choking him with butter
410. s of killing a dog than self. What good will it do for choking him with butter ? Thi
411. er Mary Teresa for gave her a prize the other day good conduct, but you it ; may be s
412. resa for gave her a prize the other day good conduct, but you it ; may be sure there
413. mation Sales, and, ; no, no, it was the Life of St. it Francis de herself yet, thoug
414. d they're all was a story-book. got the life of St. Patrick some time ago, for a pre
415. -book. got the life of St. Patrick some time ago, for a premium, you remember, and h
416. so. If your children were going to the same schools as mine you'd have no need of g
417. word for it." "I wish anxiously. 11 to God, Miles, ; you'd take Tim's advice at la
418. t Tim always holding up his children as will an example, and I'm bound to show him t
419. d I'm bound to show him that mine as be good Catholics, the common school. As for th
420. ught up at unlucky book, I'll take pre* good care that Eliza never gets such another
421. im found out of a sudden, that " it was time to be moving home." it ; " Isn't a poor
422. speak you wish to it, to try hiic again will him 1" I will, if but I haven't much ho
423. to it, to try hiic again will him 1" I will, if but I haven't much hopes, for a rea
424. ve." " " And what is it, Tim ?" Oh it's one I don't care ! to tell you," said it."
425. u," said it." Tim, ''it would do you no good to hear night, So he bid them goodstore
426. onvince a lie's of tie fool against his will, same opinion still." lo the various qu
427. e a lie's of tie fool against his will, same opinion still." lo the various question
428. ie's of tie fool against his will, same opinion still." lo the various questions which
429. else let me keep the book I What in the world shall I do, aunty " God direct you for
430. I What in the world shall I do, aunty " God direct you for the best V ! I wish I co
431. t you, but you see I can't. Pray for to God and the Blessed Virgin to keep you out
432. eep you out of harm's way. I think it's time will you were going home now, look-out.
433. ou out of harm's way. I think it's time will you were going home now, look-out. your
434. s staff gone; " Poor Mary it's the hard fate that he's prcpaiv ; ing for you with hi
435. nd him to reap what for ; he's when the time comes for sowing now, nobody can be sor
436. ake, as my poor old mother used to say, God be good and merciful to her soul. ,, "
437. my poor old mother used to say, God be good and merciful to her soul. ,, " Amen !"
438. to say, God be good and merciful to her soul. ,, " Amen !" responded Nelly, with pio
439. ious fervor, and then the night prayers being read aloud by Tim, the family went " to
440. ht prayers being read aloud by Tim, the family went " to prepare for bed," not without
441. ful St. Patrick's day in Tim Flanagan's peace- household. Next morning Miles Blake we
442. r bigotry. lady, " they ; have eyes and will not see ears and will not hear enlighte
443. y ; have eyes and will not see ears and will not hear enlighten them, but they will
444. will not hear enlighten them, but they will not be enlightened we would how ! sad a
445. thus ' in darkness and the shadow ! of death,' in the full glare of gospel truth And
446. of death,' in the full glare of gospel truth And in she gave an extra twist to her g
447. on to pass in froirt of : ' about Every time I had any of the !' ' benches, they'd b
448. ' tell Did Don't you wish you ever V or one would ask another guess not!' the other
449. r one would ask another guess not!' the other would answer, you were a papist?' I 'fo
450. real mean of father to return the book. opinion." !" my Your opinion for said his in mo
451. o return the book. opinion." !" my Your opinion for said his in mother, lajnng Bmoothin
452. hand, down the "and who asked you, your opinion ? How dare you speak so of what jrour f
453. AKES AND FLANAGANS. guess I've about as good a right to give an opinion as any one e
454. s I've about as good a right to give an opinion as any one else. A'n't I a native-born
455. good a right to give an opinion as any one else. A'n't I a native-born citizen "
456. as any one else. A'n't I a native-born citizen " • ' of these United States V " Get
457. to keep ; my hands off you I You a I'll citizen, indeed if ever I hear you say the like
458. is foi " Come ! along, Eliza, it's most time school, I reckon." " For shame, Harry m
459. aid Harry, turning short round, her the truth ?" " didn't I " Well, but suppose like
460. be boy always " Well, 14 shan't 1 he a man one of these days ?" ] suppose so." thi
461. boy always " Well, 14 shan't 1 he a man one of these days ?" ] suppose so." think I
462. act or speak like a Then, if how do you man, I don't begin in time ?" Bight of the
463. en, if how do you man, I don't begin in time ?" Bight of the school-house, They were
464. is mother to such ; perfection that any one else could not help laughing but Eliza
465. BEGINS TO BEAR FRUIT. mium. hope "It's good for her," said one and another. 51 "I s
466. T. mium. hope "It's good for her," said one and another. 51 "I she'll never have th
467. nd another. 51 "I she'll never have the chance of acting so again." Now, Eliza Blake w
468. er, and nally resolved ever she did get one again, she at home, but just put it it.
469. s out to tell Miss Davison of Eliza's a good resolution," and when Eliza came next m
470. came next morning, she found friend." " particular This girl, herself, to her great surpri
471. lp her a little with her lessons." This change was wholly incomprehensible to Eliza, b
472. our I told her how you had made up your mind like the rest of us for the time to com
473. p your mind like the rest of us for the time to come. for premiums Never mind thanki
474. or the time to come. for premiums Never mind thanking me, you'll do as much hard, no
475. much hard, now, and win bacK me another time. lost." Try what you've And leave Eliza
476. ide was hurt by the and she made up her mind to them no room to laugh at her for the
477. to them no room to laugh at her for the time to come ; 3* ho BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. f
478. KES AND FLANAGANS. first ihe was always one of the in every class, and she would ke
479. r or mother, for ever then I'd lose the chance, low and — at least for a good " ivan
480. the chance, low and — at least for a good " ivant while. I'll I cm raise the mone
481. 't you ask the governor *' say you some other purpose." Eliza," said he, " here's Zac
482. come along home Harry, keeps us." " In one minute, Eliza. he, in a they'll wonder
483. ary. the corner of Canal street. ! " At Mind, at half-past seven precisely of Well,
484. , at half-past seven precisely of Well, good bye, Miss ; what I told you you shall s
485. d you you shall see Think Blake. what a good time we'll have." Eliza only shook her
486. you shall see Think Blake. what a good time we'll have." Eliza only shook her head,
487. ed with faster emphasis. " Father takes good care of that !" " Dear me, but you're i
488. o now and then. As it him sometimes for being so stingy about his money, for they wou
489. consented to keep the secret " for that one time," on condition that the like was n
490. ented to keep the secret " for that one time," on condition that the like was never
491. ," said hi* father, " I thought you had one." THE TREE BEGINS TO BEAK FRUIT. " Oh,
492. l, " it 01 strikes me that I bought you one myself thai time that I bought the book
493. es me that I bought you one myself thai time that I bought the book of maps." The At
494. you mean, father ; oh, no, it was a new rhetoric." " Well, well ; here's the half dollar
495. don't be bothering me any more ; anyhow Mind and take care of it, though." In half a
496. re too smart for the old better. little man," observed Silas Green, a or thirteen.
497. , did I said it V of No, but !" all the same when you my father u Never mind, ; lads
498. all the same when you my father u Never mind, ; lads, never mind," said Zach, in a t
499. u my father u Never mind, ; lads, never mind," said Zach, in a tone is of authority
500. in a tone is of authority all " this no time for squabbling. in Are you re. ready no
501. llery, in the Bowery theatre, heart and soul intent on the wild exploits of Fra Diav
502. the brigand chief, and learning, under life. his auspices, to confound right It and
503. spices, to confound right It and wrong, vice and Harry's virtue. was a great epoch i
504. nd right It and wrong, vice and Harry's virtue. was a great epoch in had never before
505. , pervading the whole frame, heart, and mind. He forgot that there was any other wor
506. and mind. He forgot that there was any other world than the one before him, and wish
507. ind. He forgot that there was any other world than the one before him, and wished tha
508. that there was any other world than the one before him, and wished that the he coul
509. ry, " we're to have the afterpiece yet. Will you wait for It it ?" Harry knew nothin
510. ations with which the boys returnid his good night, and as Harry left the theatre wi
511. ting ; up but for him, whiling away the time darning stockings her pale face and hea
512. ther's first impulse was to say " thank God !" But checking herself, she put on as
513. hour — where you ought to What in the world kept you out so late ?" hesitated ; Har
514. itated ; Harry he had never been in the habit of tell excusing himself by falsehood,
515. was the sorrowful news for me to hear, God help me after all that Father Power sai
516. ours that are leading you astray and if God hasn't said it, they'll I see that plai
517. p it from father's ears again. for this time, and I'll never do the like Won't you,
518. you're well deserving of a beating." it will And get the beating, I promise you do m
519. get the beating, I promise you do me no good. don't ' You may look at me as hard as
520. d everywhere else as often as I get the chance. may lamp take your choice." to And so
521. u up his go to bed. " Well, but what ?" will you say when your father asks mother I
522. I can easily where you were " Oh, never mind ; that, ; manage that part of it good n
523. r mind ; that, ; manage that part of it good night !" " Good night, my son, may the
524. manage that part of it good night !" " Good night, my son, may the right road 1 Lor
525. lake, but you have ! much to answer for God forgive you this night, and bring ! a s
526. d forgive you this night, and bring ! a sense of your error I'm afraid nobody else no
527. are so rooted in you to can / them your mind — ! God help you, poor man, and !" me
528. ed in you to can / them your mind — ! God help you, poor man, and !" me along sev
529. them your mind — ! God help you, poor man, and !" me along severe with you, thcug
530. ne Next morning, Harry got a father for being; out so late " reprimand from yc u, at
531. Where " did you spend your evening, my good boy At Mr. I Thomson's, sir. Zach Thoms
532. nding in society up to Mr. Thomson as a man of good he kept a wholesale and retail
533. n society up to Mr. Thomson as a man of good he kept a wholesale and retail ; grocer
534. o him for some hundreds of dollars at a time ; he was, on the whole, a kind-hearted,
535. ; he was, on the whole, a kind-hearted, good sort of man, and Miles always found him
536. the whole, a kind-hearted, good sort of man, and Miles always found him an easy cre
537. e quite composed. that's the I way this time. was afraid of it, Harry, I forgive you
538. homson's. in They're such a respectable family, and it's so are the Greens too, that v
539. at very well for you to keep with them. religion, it I hope none of them does be at you
540. Why, you in wouldn't hear a word about religion with them twenty years. Neither Zach Th
541. Joe's just as nice, sir. ; a very nice man he is." As I was saying, you'd never he
542. is." As I was saying, you'd never hear one of them at all runuing down Papists lik
543. if Mark Edwards, a fellow is They don't mind pleases 11 a Catholic, so long as he th
544. 11 a Catholic, so long as he them every other way." and all," said his mother, " I'd
545. atholic boys. Let these lads be ever so good, they're hardly fit company for you. St
546. t below him I wonder at a woman of your sense to talk ! — so. The Sheridans and you
547. ckberries : but it is not so with these other boys there's some all credit in getting
548. 1 grow up in to manhood, they lift that will serve him well in business." Yes," said
549. save us, but you're getting high in the world yourself, when you turn up your nose at
550. l it becomes you, Miles Blake." shame's cause "Keep your temper, Mary," said Miles la
551. e seen as neighbors I'm sure they're as good father and mother's children as ever a
552. homsou or Green in the city ay and that matter, for we know they have good their foreb
553. and that matter, for we know they have good their forebearers and that's what none
554. f in the true faith ! respectability to love and serve God If you knew as much as I
555. aith ! respectability to love and serve God If you knew as much as I know of them v
556. anxiety iu his manner. " I know little good of them, Miles ! and I if tell you over
557. and can do just what they like with it. Mind my words, if you let Harry keep their c
558. st have money let it come from where it will, and he'll get a-going to the theatre,
559. dare to go to any such place without my knowledge " Maybe yes, and maybe no," said Mrs. B
560. Harry to grow up an honest, industrious man, and a good Christian, you'll keep him
561. ow up an honest, industrious man, and a good Christian, you'll keep him away from th
562. lready, if it goes any further, all the art of man can't cure it." So saying, she w
563. if it goes any further, all the art of man can't cure it." So saying, she went out
564. ns. At first it seemed as though Mary's reasoning had brought conviction to his mind he t
565. reasoning had brought conviction to his mind he thrust his hands into his breeches p
566. n the door, and at length, seeing some "good customer" enter ^.he outer door, he " f
567. the children stay where they are, for a time longer." — THE TREE BEGINS TO BEaR FR
568. o she consented, though all against her will. " But mind you must be home here by se
569. ted, though all against her will. " But mind you must be home here by see eight o'cl
570. e here by see eight o'clock at furthest will — if you're one you'll minute later y
571. o'clock at furthest will — if you're one you'll minute later your father go for
572. ever fear, mother, but we'll be home in good time ; never let us out again, if we do
573. fear, mother, but we'll be home in good time ; never let us out again, if we don't."
574. y welcomed by the elders of the Thomson family, and had, as they said themselves, a *'
575. had, as they said themselves, a *' real good time " of it. Games of various kinds, a
576. as they said themselves, a *' real good time " of it. Games of various kinds, and al
577. r, and she could not help thinking from time to TO time, BLAKES AND FLANAGANS " my c
578. could not help thinking from time to TO time, BLAKES AND FLANAGANS " my cousins or t
579. not like all this kissing," but her the time bashiulness was so ridiculed, even by h
580. tea was announced, Eliza had got over a good deal of her " awkwardness," as the othe
581. romping going on. Harry was just in his element, for be was at all times lively and rea
582. ered out something about Miss Davison*s being very kind, indeed. " And what do you sa
583. ter his afternoon's play, at once to do justice to the tongue ; but Eliza, with trembli
584. his face all in a glow, " don't let any one hear you. They don't know anything here
585. g about now —promise to me that you " will promise no such thing," replied Eliza.
586. from fhe priest, —a St. visit was the custom in Jic Peter's School, as in &B Cath Sc
587. e Catechism every day before any of the other lessons. Those who knew the their cathe
588. fice, boys were always ambitious of the honor. Mr Lanigan had always a good class of
589. s of the honor. Mr Lanigan had always a good class of boys well instructed in their
590. class of boys well instructed in their religion, Peter's Church. and these served mass
591. e birch, when necessary, as well as any man within ten gquare miles of him. To do h
592. thin ten gquare miles of him. To do him justice, it was only when all other remedies fa
593. To do him justice, it was only when all other remedies failed, that he made use of ma
594. was the influence of Dr. Power, at that time and for Church. many years after, pasto
595. Dr. Power, at that time and for Church. many years after, pastor of St. Peter's Dr.
596. r of St. Peter's Dr. Power was indeed a man "of many gifts," intellect ; endowed wi
597. Peter's Dr. Power was indeed a man "of many gifts," intellect ; endowed with a stro
598. to see her empire die And bigotry, few other minds could tame, Repentant wept beneat
599. beneath hi3 meek reply." * S"ch was the man who presided over the St. Peter's Schoo
600. honorary and scholastic the patriarchal one of Father. Most of the boys were about
601. pli- cation of the birch aforesaid. • One of these was Mi!w Xohn Augustus Shea Li
602. full Sheridan, a scion of the Sheridan family, relationship wr*h our friend Mrs. Blak
603. ion of all manner of antic Yet Mike was good-natured almost to a fault, tricks. •
604. could not keep anger against any human being one half-hour at a time. for He could l
605. not keep anger against any human being one half-hour at a time. for He could learn
606. inst any human being one half-hour at a time. for He could learn very well when he l
607. em), for Mike was a favorite with every one of his school-fellows Mike was about th
608. f his school-fellows Mike was about the same age as Harry Blake that is, ; fifteen o
609. f thirif who, he had been at almost any other school, would have thought himself a ma
610. er school, would have thought himself a man, but Mr. Lanigan allowed no premature m
611. orced to remain a boy, much against his will. Before we proceed any further with our
612. nxious eyes, some them glancing at each other with imploring gestures, as much as to
613. t Its soil is generally fertile, though many parts the exception of are overrun with
614. st mountainous country in Europe." Very good, Lawrence, very good, Mike Sheridan, th
615. y in Europe." Very good, Lawrence, very good, Mike Sheridan, the next is yours what
616. looked around as " in distress, but no one dared speak, the Mr. Lanigan's face bod
617. speak, the Mr. Lanigan's face boded no good. Go on, ?" sir, I say, what character o
618. Mike thought he had get out the bright idea before indolent " it it, and hastened t
619. vation of Edward began to hesitate. — mind"— Well, the " which "Go on, Edward, y
620. character you were going to give them. One would think you had been learning geogr
621. peluna, Yalia; u see dolid " 7 ; " Very good, Tom well, that will do. tell Now, it a
622. dolid " 7 ; " Very good, Tom well, that will do. tell Now, it as you have done so ca
623. o famous, for they were very famous for many ages throughout Europe ?" " Certainly,
624. nd such thing, Tom." The boys " Can any one tell ? mistake. No No at Tom's you. Wel
625. tudents were all parts of the civilized world. of the greatest collegiate institution
626. he greatest collegiate institutions the world ever They were two saw Well, boys, is T
627. re two saw Well, boys, is That was very good, you Protestant historians tell see, fo
628. . PETER'S SCHOOL. going to tell *\1 But mind whatTm you, so that you can answer me t
629. you, so that you can answer me the next time I put the question. SaTagossa is remark
630. ion. SaTagossa is remarkable for having one of the most famous shmes of the Blessed
631. e go to pray when they want to ask some particular favor, and where miracles are performed
632. hand on his right knee, " Well done, a custom he had when agreeably excited. timidly
633. : " little, Peter, well done ! bless my soul, where did you find that out ?" " I rea
634. tle Come me after school, Peter, I say, man, and I'll give you a nice picture. my T
635. is not 'just over Spain,' I've a great mind self put you over the desk, and thrash
636. you are in my school, to give your own opinion con! trary to mine, or insist that you
637. iced when the him on the head, and bade God bless him, after hearing Mr. Lanigan's
638. er hearing Mr. Lanigan's kind " report. God bless you, Peter, God bless you. life.
639. 's kind " report. God bless you, Peter, God bless you. life. You The are laying acq
640. t. God bless you, Peter, God bless you. life. You The are laying acquisition the fou
641. laying acquisition the foundation of a good and useful of knowledge not is said to
642. the foundation of a good and useful of knowledge not is said to be the most honorable pu
643. most honorable pursuit of is youth, but knowledge when acquired It is only a curse if it
644. by Christian principles. Remember very good to be a learned st. man, but i&ome it i
645. Remember very good to be a learned st. man, but i&ome it is still peter's school.
646. r's school. better to be T9 a Christian man ; if you can be both together, so much
647. best of his way home, thinking- ail the time what he was to do with his bright new s
648. 'll buy a Poor Peter felt hungry at the time, and the cakes iu the window looked tem
649. dow looked temptingly nice, but Peter's philosophy was stronger than his appetite, so he w
650. o he walked resolutely awuy. " Nor cast one longing, lingering look behind." There
651. ; his way home, and but it was no easy matter for him to suit himself in a book " for
652. imself in a book " for the low price of one shilling." Peter had a wholesome distru
653. metimes, when the title on the cover of one struck his fancy, tie would turn «,nd
654. so well of 11 What's the price of this one, if you please, sir V said Peter, timid
655. t for a shilling, though it ought to be one and sixpence." Peter thanked the obligi
656. " I suppose it's because Peter lavs his mind to his books, "I and I don't. no head c
657. Come along, Mike, my boy, and rub down one ot two of the horses." Daniel Sheridan
658. , and kept six or eight horses, with as many men, constantly employed. He was an upr
659. ly employed. He was an upright, honest, man, somewhat thick-headed, indeed, but kin
660. ut of late and become well to do in the world. As he used to say himself, " he had al
661. nking, want of a shilling, thanks be to God." Leaving Daniel and h's son hard at wo
662. s, let us return to Miles Blake and his family, whom we do not wish to forget. Harry h
663. . But little Eliza began to suspect the truth, and, from certain circumstances which
664. but she determined to speak to At that time Eliza was still a prudent, discreet of
665. ill a prudent, discreet of kindness and good-nature, and tenderly attach- ed to her
666. prudent, discreet of kindness and good-nature, and tenderly attach- ed to her 11 own
667. , and tenderly attach- ed to her 11 own family. she, as they like to Harry," said walk
668. ke to Harry," said walked home together one all afternoon, "I should sweeties, know
669. ney." " Well, I but I want to guess you will want to " ; know," retorted Harry, angr
670. orted Harry, angrily girls if you ain't one of the most inquisitive / ever knew " I
671. I go to the theatre Harry, doggedly. 11 matter, I know it, tell that's enough for you
672. long score to get wiped eh, ' off next time you go— West ?" I rather think so," w
673. er sneer, " ain't he kept a fog all the time by that ere feller up at the church. Pa
674. pists can't see things right clear like other folks. Can they, West ?" Before West co
675. p by a gentleman who was passing at the time. n Terrible fellows these Papists are,"
676. suppose," said the ge-ntlemau with the same quiet smile, " but God forbid that I sh
677. tlemau with the same quiet smile, " but God forbid that I should hate any of my fel
678. re* 84 BLARES AND FLANAGANS. afternoon, Good my lad ; ; let me advise you for the fu
679. ff after his comrade. " Well, if wasn't one of the knock-downs I ever laid an eye o
680. the knock-downs I ever laid an eye on ! God's it's bless- light down on ! you, Fath
681. 't complain, as long as I can get thank God, and your the bit to eat, and the rag t
682. nd the rag to cover myself an' the ould man, I'm well content." " I'm glad to hear
683. " I'm glad to hear it, Molly. contented mind and a A good conscience, generally go h
684. hear it, Molly. contented mind and a A good conscience, generally go hand in hand,"
685. e a talk with your reverence about that same Harry Blake. It's a thousand pities, si
686. ; I see everything that's goin' on an' mind I tell you, devil. sir, that boy is in
687. " said the priest, possible. visit "and will not To tell you the bless fail to act u
688. he bless fail to act upon it as soon as truth, I was just on my way to Mr. Blake on t
689. was just on my way to Mr. Blake on that same you !" business. Good the evening, and
690. Mr. Blake on that same you !" business. Good the evening, and may God /ou long This
691. !" business. Good the evening, and may God /ou long This last " An' you, too, your
692. got followed with her eye the receding form of the priest. Harry and Eliza had thei
693. ty miles off when you knocked down your man so cleverly. I had no idea you were so
694. ked down your man so cleverly. I had no idea you were so good a pugilist, Harry." !
695. so cleverly. I had no idea you were so good a pugilist, Harry." ! Neither Miles nor
696. as any yes, your reverence, Harry is as good a soldier in the city of his own is, ag
697. his own is, age, I don't care where the other " is. Young as he he knows how call to
698. e he knows how call to stand up for hi? religion as well as I could myself." And pray, M
699. Mr. Blake, what do you standing jp tor religion ?" said the priest, coolly. Blake was q
700. " What " do I call sir, standing up for religion V repeated Miles. Why. when boy or man
701. gion V repeated Miles. Why. when boy or man is alwayfe ready with word or blow to s
702. ready with word or blow to silence any one that attacks Lis that's what I call sta
703. that's what I call standing up for it." religion ; " Well, ing your my is frieud, that i
704. l, ing your my is frieud, that is it is one way, certainly, of defendfrom being the
705. it is one way, certainly, of defendfrom being the best way." religion, but far " How
706. nly, of defendfrom being the best way." religion, but far " How that, your reverence ?"
707. t far " How that, your reverence ?" " I will tell you : the best and most efficaciou
708. st efficacious is way of defending your religion to practise its duties and carry out wi
709. on to practise its duties and carry out will its principles in all your actions. By
710. your actions. By doing so you make your religion respected, without ever having occasion
711. veterate than ever against you and your religion pleased to call ; or rather, what you a
712. all ; or rather, what you are if your I religion. Such is- precisely the case with Harry
713. ase with Harry. am much afraid that his religion, he st. ever peter's school. 87 had any
714. hat. I tell you, sir, that I've as much religion as any one else, and as for Harry, I'm
715. sir, that I've as much religion as any one else, and as for Harry, I'm sure and ce
716. ry, I'm sure and certain, he'd lose his life for his religion, just as I would mysel
717. and certain, he'd lose his life for his religion, just as I would myself." ! " All very
718. e for likely to it be called on to your religion, don't it ? is you think would be prese
719. ct, and even obtained ^our promise some time ago that you would take your children s
720. ussle go to them, and I'm sure I've had many a hard with Miles on that account. bett
721. ecause there's too down his anger, much time all lost in Catholic schools prayers an
722. schools prayers and catechism aud plain truth, such things. That's the Father Power,
723. learn everything that to be learned. it will gion be excluded from the school-room,
724. school-room, be excluded pre- from the mind. sent with your their studies, Religion
725. the mind. sent with your their studies, Religion, children ; my good it sir, must be eve
726. their studies, Religion, children ; my good it sir, must be ever must regulate and
727. out they both followed their mother to one of the upper rooms. " I'm sure he has h
728. he'll hear you," said his sister in the same tone " I don't care " I wouldn't be in
729. are, Mr. Blake," said Dr. Power, " that habit of frequenting the theatre ?" in the "T
730. I know of" " But he has been there very many times, that you do not know to of." ! "
731. ing your trust — that he has not much religion in his heart or mind, though a great de
732. e has not much religion in his heart or mind, though a great deal at his finger-ends
733. at deal at his finger-ends, you have no one to blame but yourself. Had you sent him
734. an son, a dutiful, conscientious boy, a good and a good Christian. worthy brother-in
735. utiful, conscientious boy, a good and a good Christian. worthy brother-in-law, Tim F
736. and a good Christian. worthy brother-in-law, Tim Flanagan. Such are the children of
737. School, and though some of them may be will a little wild, and fond of be boyish sp
738. not those forbidden pleasures in which will precocious Protestant youth indulge ; y
739. s, are with growing up, without fear of God or rery few exceptions, man, despising
740. out fear of God or rery few exceptions, man, despising their parents in their heart
741. ming, from day to day, more reckless of duty, virtue and families who, like you, rel
742. from day to day, more reckless of duty, virtue and families who, like you, religion. G
743. uty, virtue and families who, like you, religion. Good evening, Mr. Blake if I have give
744. e and families who, like you, religion. Good evening, Mr. Blake if I have given you
745. given you but a cankering wound cannot pain I am sorry for it God grant you be heal
746. ing wound cannot pain I am sorry for it God grant you be healed without being well
747. for it God grant you be healed without being well probed. ; ; grace to profit by my
748. before he had recovered hii presence of mind, the priest was gone. — W> BLAKES AND
749. Well, to not with before ne my you the truth, Miles, he did go once, knowledge or co
750. y you the truth, Miles, he did go once, knowledge or consent, but I found it out ; came h
751. at Dan Sheridan ! — Go and forgot the other evening !" " For God's sake, Miles," sa
752. o and forgot the other evening !" " For God's sake, Miles," said Mrs. Blake, implor
753. lake, imploringly, "don't beat him this time. I'll Forgive him this once, and never
754. , followed by Eliza, the latter pale as death. " Well, now," said Miles, his fixing a
755. " asked Mr. Thomson, as he glanced from one to another, " Is there anything wrong ?
756. trifle. We were all boys ourselves, my good friend why, there's my Zaeh goes to the
757. come, Miles, forgive your son for this time." "Well, but the money, Mr. Thomson," s
758. you, ; but your whipping him over here, time, will will do no good. Harry, come for
759. but your whipping him over here, time, will will do no good. Harry, come for this i
760. your whipping him over here, time, will will do no good. Harry, come for this is my
761. ng him over here, time, will will do no good. Harry, come for this is my lad ; if yo
762. hat to take money without your father's knowledge ?" — not one brass button," said don'
763. hout your father's knowledge ?" — not one brass button," said don't value his pro
764. I it of you manual correction *iot as a particular favor, not to whip Harry. hate will
765. rticular favor, not to whip Harry. hate will — it is a barbarous practice. You ref
766. ous practice. You refuse me tnis favor, will you in ?" Miles began to remember a cer
767. ooks, Harry if ; I forgive you for this time, but mind, ever I know you to steal one
768. y if ; I forgive you for this time, but mind, ever I know you to steal one cent of m
769. ime, but mind, ever I know you to steal one cent of my money, the" or go to the the
770. y, the" or go to the theatre without my knowledge, by A " Don't FRIEND my IN NEED. said 9
771. IN NEED. said 93 Mr. Thomson, making a sign to Harry and Eliza to go up stairs. my
772. to Harry and Eliza to go up stairs. my good "Swearing is highly offensive to God. O
773. y good "Swearing is highly offensive to God. Oh swear, dear friend," ! Miles, how c
774. Blake, how happy I feel that I had the good fortune to It come I iu so seasonably.
775. ed to to see that fine boy of yours get one stroke. Miles, my heart And now, do wit
776. im a profession stance. make him a tell law yer, for r " That's just what I often M
777. ame to glue him to a bench or an anvil. God bless you, Mr. ; "he ;an afford it lawy
778. er or a dc tor, and Thomson, bat headed man its you that's the true friend, and the
779. ken for want of a loan. "And then Harry will have Zachary for a companion," he added
780. ollege. !" they can both go to Columbia will be quite convenient for all You see tha
781. hool belonging to our church, that I as good as made up my mind to send him." Mr. Th
782. ur church, that I as good as made up my mind to send him." Mr. Thomson began to look
783. ort pause. " I believe they're about as good as most men, only they have such a A'n'
784. dge of your own business than this this man — Father Power, can be ? —what say.
785. to " are " We and he hesitated, in the habit are, of obeying our priests — they're
786. nd besides, we look upon them as the of God." Mr. Thomson was seized with a trouble
787. y well in his pulpit, talking about the religion' (there lon's voice, mysteries of was a
788. what you say, but Father Power made so many objections." " Let me hear them, if you
789. me to the rescue with, "To tell you the truth, Mr. Thomson, Father Power, and my -bro
790. aid of Harry and Eliza forgetting their religion. They say, sir, that Protestant schools
791. his wife's indiscretion, and His wife's memory was not so short, and she strove to eff
792. sir," forcing in a smile, "that a wrong sense ; my good woman others, sir, took up wh
793. ng in a smile, "that a wrong sense ; my good woman others, sir, took up what she hea
794. the priest meant, and as for the their opinion isn't worth much at the best." but Thom
795. mselves. ever, I How- am only losing my time. Am I to understand, Miles, that you ha
796. "as you wish me to send Harry for this one year to Mr. Simpson, I'll not go agains
797. rvation was hardly meant Thomson's ear, being made ?" in an under-tone. " How Oh ! in
798. aid her husband, sharply 1 ; We'll try "mind your own business, my good woman Harry
799. ; We'll try "mind your own business, my good woman Harry another year with Mr. Simps
800. Simpson, sir, and I hope you'll for be good enough to put in a word with the master
801. Miles ; Simpson myself this very day. ; Good good bye, Mrs. Blake be of good heart b
802. ; Simpson myself this very day. ; Good good bye, Mrs. Blake be of good heart both o
803. day. ; Good good bye, Mrs. Blake be of good heart both of you your son is in good h
804. f good heart both of you your son is in good hands." Miles suddenly remembered that
805. mson the best friend I have I'd his the world If father have had sore bones by mark,
806. ned." " Power had got his own way, this time. But he missed For shame, Harry, don't
807. on of making a baby of myself at this ; time of day, saying my catechism and such st
808. hy, that book Miss Davison gave you the other day." " Don't speak so loud, or mother
809. day." " Don't speak so loud, or mother will hear you ;" and taking a key from a cer
810. old woman or below, to be sure," at the same time pointing downwards. Eliza either w
811. oman or below, to be sure," at the same time pointing downwards. Eliza either was, a
812. " I declare, ; that's what I am I've a mind to tell mother how you speak of her and
813. "Go on, Lizzy — all right , the best man foremost," laughed the incorrigible boy
814. laughed the incorrigible boy " And what will I be doing, ? ! think you, while you're
815. a thing to take to steal ^premium when one gets money and go you do tell." to the
816. the theatre, and speak slight- ingly of one's father and mother, and the priest. I
817. d, promising to be a better boy for the time to come, and never again to speak disre
818. htn't saj Come and Eliza, for give I'll One would think you were in a mill. me a ha
819. upon my word, they were so busy at the same lessons, that I had them three or four
820. noticed their looks. Uncle Tim cut the matter to call short by ordering " the childre
821. hope for him you may just make up your mind, Mary, to let them have their own way,
822. Blake : " they were all cousins through-other, n as they said themselves, " and Mary
823. said themselves, " and Mary Blake was a good bearted creature, always kind and frien
824. Miles. But Miles was getting up in the world, and it couldn't be expected that he'd
825. rely ironical, was taken in its literal sense by Mrs. Reilly, a tall, thin, matronly
826. , Mrs. Reilly was, on the whole, a very good woman, a sincere friend, a devoted moth
827. nd, a devoted mother, and, above all, a good Christian ; but she had an unlucky prop
828. y conversation. Mrs. Reilly's besetting sin, Family pride was and Dan Sheridan ough
829. versation. Mrs. Reilly's besetting sin, Family pride was and Dan Sheridan ought to hav
830. have known better than to tread on the good lady's corns. But Dan was none of the m
831. ne of the most clear-sighted men in the world, as we have already intimated, so he se
832. , I'm sure when it Dan Sheridan, are as good any day in the year as the likes of him
833. n married was thought the wonder of the world, and, it was low come down with my uncl
834. e wedding at all, only just for shame's cause. The likes of us, you hear that, Tim Fl
835. n in "This Dan Sheridan hasn't a proper sense, the family ?" his droll way Pm afraid,
836. Dan Sheridan hasn't a proper sense, the family ?" his droll way Pm afraid, of A FRIEND
837. D IN NEED L01 the respectability of the family he married into, and I just want you to
838. into, and I just want you to give him a good lesson on that very subject, there's no
839. , for her was never proof against Tim's good-humored " Bad manners to you, Tim, but
840. it's ready with your joke. no laughing matter family. it to speak slightingly of a de
841. eady with your joke. no laughing matter family. it to speak slightingly of a decent ol
842. e to keep him company, much against his will. That Mike is a play-boy, Nelly, and no
843. ear of what he done on young Dillon the other day V has as tricks in He many Every on
844. lon the other day V has as tricks in He many Every one answered in the negative, exc
845. er day V has as tricks in He many Every one answered in the negative, except Edward
846. ed " I hope he thrashed him well," said opinion of Dillon. Tim warmly, " for that same
847. inion of Dillon. Tim warmly, " for that same young Dillon is the devil's own boy." i
848. is the devil's own boy." if " Well, as one. he didn't thrash him," said Dan, " he
849. boy by three years." " But what in the world came between them V cried " What did he
850. What did he do to Mike V* Tim, eagerly. good for him, and the best of 1 1 102 " B LA
851. y had been out on some business, school-time. u and old it was very near There they
852. yself only laughed at him, you tell you one thing, my good man," a while, or send h
853. ghed at him, you tell you one thing, my good man," a while, or send him to a school
854. at him, you tell you one thing, my good man," a while, or send him to a school wher
855. wise as you're old, you'll just let the matter drop. like it, That's my advice to you.
856. d have said, " I only wish he may be as good a man " Dan Dan as his father." You mus
857. said, " I only wish he may be as good a man " Dan Dan as his father." You must ?" s
858. n, he had a great regard for brother in-law. What's the matter, now ?" ; 104 " BLAK
859. t regard for brother in-law. What's the matter, now ?" ; 104 " BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. W
860. AKES AND FLANAGANS. Why, nothing in the world but that they have been making me a tru
861. sposed to friend Miles ; rejoice in the honor conferred on his I'll but Tim bluntly s
862. of your office, Miles, to tell you the truth, I have ; no great respect for trustees
863. e ; a great in fifty what they are it's one trustee that has a spark of religion. "
864. re it's one trustee that has a spark of religion. " For my part, I wouldn't take a mint
865. rced laugh maybe you would if you had a chance as well as another. Somebody must be a
866. er. Somebody must be a trustee, or what will the churches do answer me that now ?" "
867. did the churches get along in Ireland, man, where such a thing as a trustee was ne
868. hat it is. Now, if it's my firm that no man who rebels against his clergy will ; ev
869. at no man who rebels against his clergy will ; ever prosper in this world or the nex
870. his clergy will ; ever prosper in this world or the next he does proslike per here a
871. es proslike per here awhile, his riches will melt ditch, for it's 1 away an old sayi
872. or it's 1 away an old saying and a true one, hack goes under his belly" snow off a
873. off a what comes ever the devil s Every one laughed, except Miles and his wife, the
874. , except Miles and his wife, the lattef being somewhat elated at the new dignity conf
875. ED. trustee. L05 Miles, to hear of your being made a Tim Flana- man that would speak
876. to hear of your being made a Tim Flana- man that would speak slightingly he was my
877. and his own uncle Indeed yes, committee man in our parish. a Miles, (God be good an
878. committee man in our parish. a Miles, (God be good and merciful to Miles, my uncle
879. tee man in our parish. a Miles, (God be good and merciful to Miles, my uncle Paddy g
880. he last — — ! him), was a committee-man, ay, and a council-man for the confrate
881. was a committee-man, ay, and a council-man for the confraternity for as good as tw
882. ouncil-man for the confraternity for as good as twenty years. And you know, as well
883. " No, I heard it's nothing of it ; but, mind you, Tim, it if anything about the scho
884. m, half-jest, and whole have nothing to mind but your Take my word for it, you'll no
885. fellow, I'll sup mine ; we'll see which will ; have the best of though, upon Will yo
886. ch will ; have the best of though, upon Will you tell him the story Dan it. my credi
887. d his story, and Miles made a show of " being highly exasperated against young Dillon
888. nst young Dillon. He was always a wild, good-for-nothing fellow," said he. 11 Beggin
889. say nothing about the schools, and with God's help I won't for — for the ; presen
890. raw over to the table and try There's a time and a place all Nelly's things." cooker
891. Sisters of Charity. almost needless to good ladies are invariably characterized by
892. s well as for conduct, so that in every one less manifested more or sweetness and m
893. taught St. Peter's female school at the time of which I write, I will only particufi
894. school at the time of which I write, I will only particufifty, and the young creatu
895. ung creature, in the second year of her other a Sister Magdalen, the elder, might wel
896. agdalen, the elder, might well monastic life. have passed for the mother of sweet Si
897. of sweet Sister Mary-Teresa, larize two one was perhaps forty-five or fair and the
898. , Sister on the respectful Magdalen had many other claims consideration of her compa
899. ter on the respectful Magdalen had many other claims consideration of her companions.
900. AKES AND FLANAGANS. fitted and vigorous mind, well abstruse subjects, abilities if t
901. the advantages of edufirst cation, her family being one of the in her native county.
902. vantages of edufirst cation, her family being one of the in her native county. Had sh
903. es of edufirst cation, her family being one of the in her native county. Had she be
904. ered public and written huge volumes on metaphysics or philosophy. But being a Catholic, as
905. written huge volumes on metaphysics or philosophy. But being a Catholic, as I have said,
906. lumes on metaphysics or philosophy. But being a Catholic, as I have said, and born in
907. t up by the Sisters of Loretto, and her mind was early imbued with the old- fashione
908. arning as a mere accessory to the grand science of salvation ; very good and very usefu
909. o the grand science of salvation ; very good and very useful in its own place, but n
910. de the primary or fundamental object of education. So instead light," of blazing forth, "
911. hought proper step of retiring from the world with all her natural and of her acquire
912. es, and all the rare to live endowments mind a life of seclusion and of mortificatio
913. all the rare to live endowments mind a life of seclusion and of mortification among
914. rtues were hidden in " the bosom of her God," and devoted to Him in the service of
915. only distinguished from her sisters in religion by her humility ; still greater diffide
916. ister Magdalen was indeed a ministering angel. Such was — THE sisters' school. •"
917. ery beautiful in person, ana as pure in mind spirits ; and heart as are the celestia
918. er more than all the rest. strange, the other children said, But that was nothing for
919. was at to the pet of the whole school. One morning, about a week after the social
920. been running in their heads ever since one memorable day, some two or three weeks
921. listening to the mild admonition of the good Sister, her sharp eye caught the grand
922. her. Ellie would " give anything in the world to see those pictures," and Susy " had
923. those pictures," and Susy " had a great mind to ask Sister Mary-Teresa to show them.
924. ery early some morning, and then we can other more worldly schools nothing. ; ; look
925. ook at them so nicely before any of the other girls come." But alas ! for Ellie's fin
926. 't is too bad, and we coming " What the matter with my little Susy mornu ing ?" said t
927. l her ?" whispered Ellie. 11 Yes, but I will, Ellie — I know Sister Mary-Teresa It
928. — I know Sister Mary-Teresa It's all will get leave for us to look at them. about
929. ate smile ; " Ellie says of pic- tures, chance, for you see and we do want to see them
930. e us. ter Ellie il and would be ever so good." Well, Susy, suppose I show you the pi
931. Susy, suppose I show you the pictures, will you and Ellie, promise not to look roun
932. tle Mary Smith, and showed them " every one of the pictures" in the mysterious blac
933. infinite satisfaction. The book was no other than a volume of Butler's Lives of the
934. derness in his early childhood to serve God in solitude and in mortification. Numer
935. all them all, rang for prayeis. By this time most of the in were in and listening to
936. th a short of the actions of the day to God and a little Creed, 112 prayer foi I3LA
937. pils and their accomplished teacher, we will remain with Sister Mary-Teresa and her
938. ldren. " Well, children I" said all the good Sister, seeing them properly settled in
939. Sally!" Thou shalt not steal !" " Very good What is forbidden by this commandment ?
940. her publicly ©r privately, without his knowledge and consent." Alice ! " Very if well, i
941. Smith, you were to take a sixpence from one of your companions without her knowledg
942. from one of your companions without her knowledge, would you thereby break this seventh c
943. 't take a sixpence, or a penny from any one — unless my father or take it would i
944. harm almost you took it from me or any one else. You it — know, my dear children
945. t does not say, thou shalt not from any one except your father and mother, but simp
946. SCHOOL. jrou 113 take anything from any one without his knowledge and consent, you
947. take anything from any one without his knowledge and consent, you violate the seventh co
948. you violate the seventh commandment of God." 11 Well, then," said Ellie Flanagan,
949. idden by the eighth commandment ?" Yery good. what is Ellie could for her : go no fu
950. and speeches hurtyou to our neighbor's honor or reputation." " Right, Alice, quite r
951. commandment not only to tell lies, but truth, when it might injure your neighany way
952. , I scarcely think you have sinned this matter at because you spoke that it through ig
953. rough ignorance. You did not know was a sin to publish the faults of another ?" " N
954. u, my dear child, (hat you committed no sin, but, remember, you can never have that
955. You now broken, and understand how the will, I trust, commandment is be care. obser
956. care. observe that holy precept for the time to come." in the affirmative, All the c
957. te the About a who may calcu- amount of good effected during that short time ? who m
958. ount of good effected during that short time ? who may tell what precious fruit it b
959. lumny and detraction a grievous — how many wound thefts, how many it prevarica? pr
960. grievous — how many wound thefts, how many it prevarica? prevented how many and su
961. s, how many it prevarica? prevented how many and surely it is it saved the hearts of
962. friends, ay I even the loving heart of God ! — Ah God I a pitiable thing to hear
963. I even the loving heart of God ! — Ah God I a pitiable thing to hear Catholic par
964. Catholic parents com- plain of so much time being lost in Catholic schools in ! tea
965. olic parents com- plain of so much time being lost in Catholic schools in ! teaching
966. and learning the Christian doctrine —Time J What If is time, but the ladder given
967. Christian doctrine —Time J What If is time, but the ladder given us to ascend to i
968. to it ? we use not for that purpose, it will be turned the velocity to other way, an
969. pose, it will be turned the velocity to other way, and lead downward with double the
970. duties to own souls, all else that they God and man, and to their may learn is wort
971. o own souls, all else that they God and man, and to their may learn is worthless tr
972. . real 115 or any value either for this world the next. A day or two after this pract
973. o his children. was in the when all the family were assembled in the little sitting ro
974. is book and heaved a heavy " What's the matter, Tim Mrs. Flanagan with affectionate so
975. all she can to getting " make them read good books at home, they're now that they wo
976. that they won't read them, do what she will. it Novels are the whole go with them n
977. ng their father " *' seems, and all the time." God could look on them this night," s
978. r father " *' seems, and all the time." God could look on them this night," sighed
979. you that I'm proud and happy to has the good memory all out. hear you talk that way,
980. hat I'm proud and happy to has the good memory all out. hear you talk that way, my dau
981. you learn with them holy bless you, — God ; my child ; but it's nuns. I must buy
982. you a nice new doll for that P "And me one me, father," cried little Susy, " won't
983. en pussy, I If 1 get you a doll there's one to be had in little New York city. Go o
984. r lessons learned, Ned, go and get that Life of St. Patrick that you have, and read
985. lanagans should grow up in the fear and love of God, a blessing to their parents, an
986. should grow up in the fear and love of God, a blessing to their parents, and to ea
987. blessing to their parents, and to each other. Weeks and months rolled over their hea
988. nd strength, and their minds in all the knowledge useful and necessary for quite natural
989. for quite natural that the them. first One after another the four children made th
990. ceived confirmation at the hands of the good Bishop Dubois, then titular Bishop of N
991. s, mother ; — how long is a very long time ?" " .No, no, Susy dear, a year will no
992. ng time ?" " .No, no, Susy dear, a year will not is only twelve months, and two year
993. 't be thinking the sooner. it Susy, and will pass all Your turu will soon " Can't co
994. r. it Susy, and will pass all Your turu will soon " Can't come — never fear but wi
995. ll soon " Can't come — never fear but will. Try and learn your catechism as fast a
996. and play with dolly awhile — that's a good child." Meanwhile, Edward got a situati
997. an father leather-dresser. He had got a good is solid mer- cantile education, " ; an
998. He had got a good is solid mer- cantile education, " ; and that all he wants," said his h
999. ay decently do that, first- through the world, and I have no fear but with God's help
1000. the world, and I have no fear but with God's help. rate he'll He's smart and activ
1001.mar all, and geography, Mr. Lanigan the world has me, as well as any boy can he knows
1002.ws his and, what's best of ; know them, duty to God and so I'm not much afraid but h
1003.nd, what's best of ; know them, duty to God and so I'm not much afraid but he'll do
1004.h afraid but he'll do well. He a better chance than I had," added Tim, "fori 118 BLAKK
1005.h my fortune, nor doesn't yet, foi that matter ; but, never mind, I'm getting along we
1006.esn't yet, foi that matter ; but, never mind, I'm getting along well enough without
1007.m, thanks be to This was said to Daniel God !" Sheridan, who owing had, of late, be
1008.here was no use in try in' Thanks be to God for to cram lessons down his throat. it
1009. all that, a word from me or his mother will cool him down the hottest time he is. G
1010.s mother will cool him down the hottest time he is. God knows I'd rattier see him as
1011.l cool him down the hottest time he is. God knows I'd rattier see him as he is, tha
1012.ends his knee to a priest, I hear, from one year's end to the other — Christ save
1013.est, I hear, from one year's end to the other — Christ save us !" Peter Sheridan an
1014.had to push them along, " if so be that God gave them grace to persevere." Their pa
1015.ieved " And besides, mother/' Tom, high time was doing something fortune, for vou an
1016. and do something " you me. in return." God bless you, will Tom," said the for prou
1017.ng " you me. in return." God bless you, will Tom," said the for proud mother, " It i
1018.w days Tom when I took to sick-nursing, necessity has no law. Them but sure, days are gon
1019. took to sick-nursing, necessity has no law. Them but sure, days are gone by now, a
1020. by now, and soon be able to raise with God's help and yours, I'll my head with the
1021.d Harry went to college, not to forgive God — speak of Eliza going to that grand
1022.ng lane has no turn, and may be my turn will come ; next. God be good to if my uncle
1023.n, and may be my turn will come ; next. God be good to if my uncle, Father O'Flynn,
1024.may be my turn will come ; next. God be good to if my uncle, Father O'Flynn, or my p
1025.chone the day my mother may she rest in peace came home to the new house that my gran
1026.r her and my father, she had her twelve good head of cattle, and came home riding in
1027.my uncle Phelim and poor Father O'FIynn God nessy be merciful to them father, by
1028. O'Shaugh! a very cute, well-discoursed man, and read a power, but myself doesn't k
1029.s the begin- ning of 11 my fortune. so, Mind dear that, I now Well, I hope !" — ho
1030.hat, I now Well, I hope !" — hope so. God enable you, poor fellow With all his pe
1031.ness and self conceit, Tom Reilly was a good lad, dutiful and respectful to his moth
1032.make him- and had early got the name of being careful and industrious. In money matte
1033.s tim Flanagan's household. niotPcr, no one 121 scru- had a right to blame him. He
1034.ter, including the Christmas and Easter duty. Dr. Power had been heard to say fas Mi
1035. fail to well. Poor Tom had to take the world on his shoulders tery young but his miu
1036. he do ; bcarcely felt the load a heavy one. chief pleasure, Business was Tom's fai
1037.arcely felt the load a heavy one. chief pleasure, Business was Tom's fairly and after he
1038. say that he could hardly without it. A man was Tom of the in his peculiar turn of
1039. was Tom of the in his peculiar turn of mind, having buoyancy or elasticity oi youth
1040. the their dissimilarity of disfriends, same age, and, notwithstanding position, the
1041.tanding position, they were always very good together. and were muscu- generally see
1042.nd open countenance, full of gaiety and good-nature Though Lot was fond of a very st
1043.en countenance, full of gaiety and good-nature Though Lot was fond of a very studious
1044.e book were not too large, nor too dry. History was his particular forte, and by the ti
1045.too large, nor too dry. History was his particular forte, and by the time he reached man's
1046.ry was his particular forte, and by the time he reached man's estate he had acquired
1047.cular forte, and by the time he reached man's estate he had acquired a very fair kn
1048.an's estate he had acquired a very fair knowledge of its principal details, both in ancie
1049.and had read what was to be read of the history of the United States, and had a due res
1050.d States, and had a due respect for the memory of Washington, together with a modern t
1051.modern times. He proper estimate of the honor of American citizenships but 6 — f 22
1052. made a deep and impression on Edward's mind. Much of his leisure time sit was spent
1053.n on Edward's mind. Much of his leisure time sit was spent fathers. in such reading,
1054.e, and he took care to supply him, from time to time, with the best works of the bes
1055.e took care to supply him, from time to time, with the best works of the best author
1056.the best works of the best authors. The good self, priest loved the boy for his Iris
1057.ministry, the in still fondly cherished memory thought of his own dear land. He loved
1058. where centuries have given Genius, and truth, and learning, vainly vast, To call her
1059. the abbey's walls."* But Dr. Power had other good reasons Edward. He was so frank an
1060.bbey's walls."* But Dr. Power had other good reasons Edward. He was so frank and so
1061.dward. He was so frank and so generous, good-humored, that better it for liking so w
1062.gan's household. example of his 123 his good parents, and the bent given to mind by
1063.his good parents, and the bent given to mind by his ancient master, had all borne go
1064.nd by his ancient master, had all borne good fruit. Edward Flanagan was just what an
1065. what an Irishman's son ought to be, no matter where he is born or educated IS* B LAKE
1066. SCHOOL — - UNCLE TIM'S PRACTICAL AND OTHER MATTERS. Seven years had passed since t
1067.nited houses of Blake and Flanagan in a state of transition, just passing from childh
1068.e on both families. Miles Blake had the habit of calling him People had somehow got i
1069.omehow got into Mr. Blake, and when any one, presuming on very old acquaintance, di
1070., and in the spiritual they were hardly one whit more docile or obedient. " Deck'd
1071. point of view, from his highly- valued religion The truth was, that whatever he had had
1072.w, from his highly- valued religion The truth was, that whatever he had had before th
1073. during these eventful seven years What good with his angry contentions with t^e pri
1074.y prosperity, Miles qualities, had lost many of his and acquired bad ones not a few.
1075.y her head something higher than in the good old times ; fallen into flesh," too, co
1076.into flesh," too, considerably, and the world knows that a good Is, portly rotundity
1077.onsiderably, and the world knows that a good Is, portly rotundity of figure of itsel
1078.nd the trusteeship, not to speak of the honor reverting from her "highly-accomplished
1079. Master Harry you would find it no easy matter him in the tall, thin, and rather cynic
1080.mself (though where the T. came from no one knew, not even himself), had graduated
1081.ce of a famous lawyer, and were, in due time, for As to recognize admitted to the ba
1082.es, both male and female. this quite in love with The young ladies were new Damon an
1083.ry T. Blake never condescended to go in time for the beginning of Mass. was always o
1084.d, or rather lounged up the entered the family pew, and quietly took possession of his
1085.so), to remain during the where he took good care remainder of the service, bending
1086. care remainder of the service, bending one knee at the elevation as a mere matter
1087.ing one knee at the elevation as a mere matter of form. Then Mr. Henry T. Blake would
1088.ee at the elevation as a mere matter of form. Then Mr. Henry T. Blake would lean his
1089.lly on left the side of the pew, taking good care to exhibit a costly topaz which sp
1090.a sweetness in " her bonnie blue e'en," many a rare quality of mind and heart, and w
1091.in " her bonnie blue e'en," many a rare quality of mind and heart, and who judged the b
1092.nnie blue e'en," many a rare quality of mind and heart, and who judged the book by i
1093. father, subjected to a false system of education, she was still so amiable, in a natural
1094.of everything, without obtaining a real knowledge of anything in particular, except it mi
1095.taining a real knowledge of anything in particular, except it might be called the whole ar
1096.ar, except it might be called the whole art of charming, or some such science. eigh
1097.the whole art of charming, or some such science. eight or ten grand pieces, She could p
1098.grieve to say. Eliza was well versed in history dered. — so, at least, she consi- —
1099.t, she consi- —that To be is sure her knowledge was rather one-sided to say, she had re
1100. To be is sure her knowledge was rather one-sided to say, she had read no Catholic
1101.o, THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. Dot one, but what difference did that 129 make?
1102.nd, Eliza As to poor Ireit. had read no particular history of None , of her teachers had e
1103.s to poor Ireit. had read no particular history of None , of her teachers had ever ment
1104. , of her teachers had ever mentioned a History of Ireland indeed, the casual notice of
1105.try, introduced here and there into the history of England, was more than enough. Whate
1106.England, was more than enough. Whatever history Ire- land had, was, of course, mixed up
1107.ept ferocity and superstition, so their history can have If I little interest for had t
1108. to forget it any refined or cultivated mind. — — I myself, and make others forg
1109.ventured to suggest, in reply, that the history of Greece and of other countries, which
1110.eply, that the history of Greece and of other countries, which she had read, was also
1111. You are a tion. I bow to your superior judgment." sweet gentle girl, Eliza," replied th
1112.I may, at times, overstep the bounds of prudence. You had her first go now and practice
1113., last) manifestation in favor of Irish history. So fared too, with Irish music. in tha
1114.ng school, as who did happen to pick up one of them out of doors to practice it in
1115. not permitted was only fact, it losing time learning such old trumpery music. In Ir
1116. that, as a seemed as though everything matter of course, everything antiquated or old
1117. Miss Johnion, and Miss Haramersley. or One two ministers visited the academy from
1118. two ministers visited the academy from time to THE FASHIONABLE BOARDING-SCHOOL. din
1119. The poison was making slow but certain progress in her mind, and thus went on for years
1120.making slow but certain progress in her mind, and thus went on for years, until the
1121., and thus went on for years, until the time came when Eliza's education was declare
1122.years, until the time came when Eliza's education was declared complete, and her parents
1123.ed complete, and her parents thought it time to take her from school. And high time
1124. time to take her from school. And high time it it was, too, for she was turned of e
1125.from her mother thought it school " for good and all," necessary to celebrate the ev
1126.us for the opportunity of exhibiting at one end the same time, her new house, the r
1127.pportunity of exhibiting at one end the same time, her new house, the richness and e
1128.unity of exhibiting at one end the same time, her new house, the richness and elegan
1129.d accomplishments of provided Eliza. in One of Stoddart's best pianos had been anti
1130.al divertissement. These matters itself being all duly considered, the whole family r
1131.lf being all duly considered, the whole family resolved " into a committee on the all-
1132., alleging that their uncle Tim and his family would not find themselves at home in su
1133.f the The Flanagans could be asked some other evening by themselves. Well ! but you k
1134.u invite my Uncle FlanagaD and this his family, you would also havt to invite those Sh
1135.hat tiresome Mrs. Reilly and her son. I will not stand, Now mother — I tell you th
1136.ou Irish are so easily touched, is that one never knows when he I trampling on your
1137.trampling on your corns. I Be pacified, good mother, meant no harm, assure you." Mrs
1138.words unkindly. You know ; he would not world hurt your feelings but remember that th
1139.ally different from that to which 11 my good uncle and his family belong." ! Why, Lo
1140. that to which 11 my good uncle and his family belong." ! Why, Lord bless me, child on
1141.ly belong." ! Why, Lord bless me, child one would think to he?*" you and Henry talk
1142. party have them at this that is, if it will never do to you want to make it what we
1143.f —a graciously con who was now, as a matter the motion was the house — privilege
1144. duly recorded in that of Flanagan. Not one " note of preparation " was lost on the
1145.t the two maid- servants of Mrs. Blake, being Irish, as a matter of course, had store
1146.rvants of Mrs. Blake, being Irish, as a matter of course, had stored up in their memor
1147.eople, and between them they took right good care that the Flanagans should know all
1148.occasion of the great party. Instead of being annoyed at the slight put upon them by
1149.y amused, and Tim him- self watched the progress of the affair with intense inteThe youn
1150. joke. first disposed to view it in the same light, but their father laughed them ou
1151.dward m a parties. John was serving his time to the trade ot THE FASHIONABLE BOARDIN
1152.sing in his 13* father's shop, with two other apprentices. letters, Edward kept the b
1153.% ; was that all three worked into each other's hands thej" had nothing to pay out to
1154. was studying looked upon as a thriving family. for the priesthood, and had already go
1155.san were still under the care of the if good useful their Sisters, and were making a
1156. were making a steady, lot a very rapiS progress, in the education. various branches of
1157.eady, lot a very rapiS progress, in the education. various branches of a good and They we
1158.in the education. various branches of a good and They were both learning music, and
1159.addition to the social enjoyment of the family. a small share to the common had a rema
1160.lin, so " they weren't depending on any one for arnusemeut. They could amuse thresh
1161.ld, for they were all own happy it each other, and desired no their friends other soc
1162.ach other, and desired no their friends other society, except might be and relatives,
1163. and relatives, the Sheridans and happy family was that of Tim Flanagan, grace of God,
1164.mily was that of Tim Flanagan, grace of God, and in the exact fill* fillment of eve
1165.about their making of us — for, thank God, that's what they can't do but I want t
1166.me them a little, and that's the honest truth." 11 Well, well, Tim, have your own w a
1167.en her husband was gone ; M your joking will do them as little good now, as your r ;
1168. ; M your joking will do them as little good now, as your r ; advice did when might
1169.ble recover her composure. ; Well, that same's a comfort," said Tim, drily think of
1170. comfort," said Tim, drily think of the time, Mary, "its wonderful a-days. I short p
1171.of strapping gossoons, vieing with each other to see who'd have his ridge of potatoes
1172.d gerska, gathering for six spades at a time. We weren't we are now, Mary ; but, aft
1173.ull silks or satins then, and plenty of good country Mary, but there was and better
1174.ut there was and better than cheer, and good decent country clothing ; &11 that, the
1175. country clothing ; &11 that, there was peace in our hearts, because they were simple
1176.expression b.ick pitying tenderness, as memory brought " The days that erst had been.'
1177.Why, Tim, a sermon you're going a queer time to give us ?" she said, tartly " ; if i
1178.htj polite he was tco, and, indeed, the same invita- was a condescension on his part
1179.; compliments to him and Miss Eliza. 41 Good bye, Mary take care and don't overheat
1180.yourself to think of Baid Tim, with the same provoking I. smile. ! " I'll Mary dear
1181. and so do morrow or next day !" to see Good bye how you to- all after the Mrs. Blak
1182.e calico dress. 11 What on earth is the matter with you, mother ?" she 140 asked, BI.A
1183.hat I had no wish to see at the present time/' replied Mrs. Blake, shortly. here, if
1184.e, shortly. here, if had your Uncle Tim good for I didn't get a it. worrying no poor
1185.If I had stood it out I on Tim's people being invited, wouldn't have had to go throug
1186.e comes the Henry !" Mrs. Blake now how matter stands. parlor-door, Henry," she said,
1187.ance at her mother, " I fear talked the matter over before ?" somebodj !" >lse has." e
1188.he told me you " did ; remarking at the same time, that it was very kind ,, and very
1189.ld me you " did ; remarking at the same time, that it was very kind ,, and very cond
1190. Harry ; He I has been quizzing you. of honor I didn't invite I pledge you my word No
1191.ar of that offers. — but may some let other time it. when an opportunity Think no m
1192.that offers. — but may some let other time it. when an opportunity Think no more a
1193.to disturb the cheerful serenity of his mind. His wife was not so fortunate ; consid
1194.her brother, and his genand intelligent family, excluded social meeting by a caprice w
1195. and John are as well to be seen as any one here. I wonder what'a got into Henry an
1196.nd Eliza that they don't want to see no matter where they their first own people about
1197. herself, " wouldn't " with pleasurable emotion. Now, if it be a great thing all out 1"
1198.ce that his wife well understood. "What man 41 about the concert?" inquired Mr. Gre
1199.r former acquaintance, Silas, of twenty-one. now a tall " I thought the young folks
1200. Eliza blushing all still look for some particular piece "It's more deeply affected to in
1201.ing in that corner, turning over in his mind his opening charge for to-mor- Zachary
1202.d Zachary, when he had given sufficient time for the enjoy- ment of his practical je
1203. adjourn that case next term. There's a judgment pending over somebody," he added in a l
1204.llow ! I give let you full permission \ mind the music now, and don't into that corn
1205. savage breast,' and I'm sure your lady-love has no savage breast/ so, leave your ho
1206.e your hopes in the hands of Orpheus !" courage ' 1 Henry it only knit his brows and tr
1207.utiful song, " Hear me, Norma !" By the time the song was finished, first Henry was
1208.nd, he called out " Eliza, play us up a good Irish jig. It's many a long year since
1209.liza, play us up a good Irish jig. It's many a long year since your mother and I foo
1210. utterly confounded, and looked at each other in mute astonishment. "For any sake, He
1211.ous for a light foot heart once in your time. Remember Auld ' Lang Syne,' and show o
1212.'s jig,' then, or ' Off she goes,' them good' jigs ?" of them, pa, I never heard of
1213.hat ! "Oh you have, Mr. Blake ?" I'm no particular, so at you anything at all will 4 ; * g
1214.o particular, so at you anything at all will 4 ; * give us something that there's go
1215.ll 4 ; * give us something that there's good footing in." THE SOIREE " Well, here's
1216.s excitement, she seemed to take a real pleasure in proving that Miles's retrospective c
1217.the dance where maidens gaily trip." As soul, for Miles himself, he danced with ail
1218.xposing themselves and associates whose opinion was everything to them. Whether Jig, th
1219.towed on honest John Gilpin, when Every soul cried out " well done I" As loud as the
1220.uivocal smile, " I bow to your superior judgment, is Mr. it Blake. I confess the jig a s
1221. name of if as long I could have played one I had liked, I did bat ; you saw tell I
1222.rifle. You know 1 too well, my ! pretty one, If how much I do care about some folks
1223.o all. But I come, let us have a waltz, will you, before I leave ? see mother and th
1224.lar. of the evening's amusement. By the time the last couple had reached their seats
1225.hereit the elderly ladies declared high time to separate. A few minutes more and the
1226.nds dead ;" and would that we could say happiness remained, when 150 the guests BLAKES Af
1227.a tone of reproach. " Never father it's mind him, Eliza, let him go on/' said her he
1228.ther uncomforta- Mis. Blake took up the matter more warmly than husband seemri to do.
1229. afraid it's something worse that's the matter with you, for the devil's ! taking full
1230.u. I have my eye on your goings on this time back, and the blood to many a time you
1231.ngs on this time back, and the blood to many a time you brought my face with your ji
1232.this time back, and the blood to many a time you brought my face with your jibes and
1233.lves ?" made fools of our- Eliza made a sign to took to answer for him. Henry to kee
1234.ted with more respect by both feel so ! same house with us ! Remember we're not depe
1235.hough you treat us as if we were, which God in heaven forbid Now, just mind what I'
1236.e, which God in heaven forbid Now, just mind what I'm going to tell you both as them
1237.s the first, so it'll be the last 1" it time they shall ever gather together in my h
1238.ht a it isn't s*o blush of shame to any one's face, but waltzes, with your and some
1239.for all you think yourself such a great man, and look down so — scornfully on for
1240. us for them who made you what you are. God that, anyhow I'm afraid we'll have it t
1241.ts, "if you or my father suppose that / will allow you to treat me as a boy, I beg t
1242.ompetent to do so —pardon me you that pain, but I would have you understand, once
1243.I would have you understand, once for I will allow do ! If it no one to dictate to m
1244.nd, once for I will allow do ! If it no one to dictate to me what I am to say 01 do
1245.n go elsewhere Indeed, I would prefer a change of residence on many accounts, and woul
1246.I would prefer a change of residence on many accounts, and would long since have pro
1247.d it might hurt your feelings. sceur /" Good night ! Bon soir t ma chert So saying,
1248.ther," said Eliza, eagerly "he only bid good night in French. That was all, I assure
1249. in were, and make of us, by speaking a language we don't understand Ju&t as if his lang
1250. dancing— THE SOIREE. and his 153 all law into the bargain, didn't ? come out of
1251.l, they'll on their account laugh at us art I — gathering a faction of their frie
1252.them. Go to your bed, Eliza and pray to God to give you grace to obey the fourth co
1253.lose observer, of meaning. would have a world She kissed her father and mother and le
1254.ther and mother stood looking at ; each other with a sort of vacant stare. At last Mr
1255.sciences, and dreary forebodings coming evil : M The dark comciuning is with God, Th
1256.ng evil : M The dark comciuning is with God, The warning finm on high." Leaving the
1257.uld, aftei 7* 154 BL1KES AND FLANAGANS. good friend, the fatigues of the day, let us
1258.expected. <: Sure enough, Tim, it was a good joke," said she, " but I feel too sorry
1259.poor Mary it to laugh at it. And, then, science, to say that how could you reconcile Ha
1260.est or earnest. lie, Tim But ; it's not good to ; tell that's true did you see Mrs.
1261.he great party that and didn't the poor soul go and lay out upwards of twenty dollar
1262.wrong, to but Tom said his clothes were good get a new suit enough, und he wouldn't
1263.om you nevjr saw a had his ; doubts the time, whether so, they'd be asked or not but
1264.but poor Sally wasn't and woman in your life so confounded as she THE SCENE CHANGES.
1265.he'll never exchange words herself with one of the Blakes, old or young." " Poor Sa
1266. why, it was a downright atiront to the memory of Father O'Flynn, and all the other gr
1267.e memory of Father O'Flynn, and all the other great people, not to speak of her uncle
1268.at grand-father, Terence O'Shaughuessy, God be merciful to them all I" added " I sh
1269. added " I shouldn't Tim, with a sudden change of manner. speak so lightly of the dead
1270. just to please Sally/' must give her a chance to show off her new dress, mother," sai
1271.d my father have no Poor Mrs. Reilly we will do what we can to objection. and I thin
1272.can to objection. and I think our party will be a more conconsole her J ; We genial
1273. be a more conconsole her J ; We genial one to her than my aunt Blake's." !" " God
1274. one to her than my aunt Blake's." !" " God it bless his kind heart said the father
1275.bout our parties, for we never have any one but our own We can talk it over when yo
1276.s sons came home to dinner, there was a good deal of talk about the proposed party,
1277.ere to be invited or not. rather of the same opinion. Edward ; was, at first, deci-
1278.o be invited or not. rather of the same opinion. Edward ; was, at first, deci- dedly op
1279. at first, deci- dedly opposed to their being asked " and his father was Not that I o
1280. father was Not that I owe them any ill-will," said " but then, it really does seem
1281.en relatives, for ; ; — years. So, as God is so independent of them, we'll just l
1282. so independent of them, we'll just let good as to leave us wholly them run their ri
1283. them run their rig. these senti- Not a one of them we'll ask." But Mrs. Flanagan c
1284.nd gentle, and forgiving, she had so of many excuses to offer on behalf the Blakes,
1285.PROSPECT. 151 She just called to see us one afternoon, and siaid only a Susy arid I
1286.y a Susy arid I went to their house the other little while. day, and we wanted her to
1287.on; able schools, I never want to go to one. I want to love every one, and have eve
1288.s, I never want to go to one. I want to love every one, and have every one love me."
1289.want to go to one. I want to love every one, and have every one love me." Her head.
1290. want to love every one, and have every one love me." Her head. brother drew her to
1291.t to love every one, and have every one love me." Her head. brother drew her to him
1292.ou can only succeed in that, Ellie, you will girl ; be a fortuuate of life's to love
1293.llie, you will girl ; be a fortuuate of life's to love and to be loved, is the sum h
1294.will girl ; be a fortuuate of life's to love and to be loved, is the sum happiness.
1295.e's to love and to be loved, is the sum happiness. But to return to our subject, father.
1296.. But to return to our subject, father. Will you go and see to my aunt to-morrow —
1297.t privately from her whether the others will be willing come or is, not. If you'll d
1298. Mr. Lanigan in St. Peter's School, the good old man having paid the debt of nature
1299.gan in St. Peter's School, the good old man having paid the debt of nature some thr
1300.he good old man having paid the debt of nature some three or four years before. These
1301.ree or four years before. These matters being his vest all arranged, Edward took out
1302.this forenoon who sent a present to two good — if I could find them anywhere." ! "
1303.could find them anywhere." ! " Oh we're good, !" Edward ; we're good me —and me
1304.." ! " Oh we're good, !" Edward ; we're good me —and me —give it to cried both g
1305.lied Edward, with a smile, " but mother will answer for you, I'll see what can be do
1306.acing her on a low seat beside him " no matter who the giver is, Susy dear he gives th
1307.ey goes 1" and his roice trerobfod with emotion. A HAPPY FAMILY. " J 59 "God's like ble
1308.s roice trerobfod with emotion. A HAPPY FAMILY. " J 59 "God's like blessing be about h
1309.d with emotion. A HAPPY FAMILY. " J 59 "God's like blessing be about him, I if the
1310.other, know it well !" said every young man of his age was him, there would be few
1311.ou don't is make me proud. You know and honor. always dangerous, and never more so th
1312.en comes from those father, are whom we love Well, you coming back to the store if n
1313.ome together, and leave the store and I will go, for — to strangers, let them be e
1314.o, no, John," replied his brother, " it will be much me to stay, as I can take a han
1315. John can come together, father, and it will be time enough for me when you get back
1316.n come together, father, and it will be time enough for me when you get back." This
1317.e was not a happier, or a more grateful man in the whole city. His heart overflowed
1318. What have of the business. I done that God is so bountiful to me —how can I repa
1319.ave them !" Bit still Tim kept thanking God, and praising his holy name, and wonder
1320. 1 60 BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. CHAPTER X A FAMILY PARTY AT TTAf rh FLANAGAN'S The greater
1321.ns for the coming festival. Their joint experience in the culinary art was called into req
1322. Their joint experience in the culinary art was called into requisition, and the re
1323.s highly credit- able to all concerned. One made in turn, cakes, another tarts, ano
1324. custards, jellies, Susan helping every one It and hlanc mange, Ellie and wherever
1325. home," as they was getting near dinner-time, and look-out for them." this there wou
1326.look-out for them." this there would be many a " Now mind and come early tell evenin
1327.them." this there would be many a " Now mind and come early tell evening I" was Mrs.
1328.lly communicated their thoughts to each other, most people do in similar circumstance
1329.l ! off. But himself sure is it's whole family in his Tim just all way, and as glad to
1330.Tim just all way, and as glad to see us same with the as plain and homely about him
1331.a decent Edward, that's as fine a young man as you'd see in the city, and as much l
1332.s dress and manners, and living for his family. And the boys — there's yet he'll tal
1333.ome with him. There's a blessing on the same family, old and young !" '* What you sa
1334.ith him. There's a blessing on the same family, old and young !" '* What you say is tr
1335.e." " No, I never saw him," replied the other, with a quiet smile, " but he if must h
1336.lly, with In and in his old days he was one ay strong emphasis, I'm sorry of the fi
1337.ore about do as well him." " Oh ! never mind, another time afraid Daniel ibis time."
1338.s well him." " Oh ! never mind, another time afraid Daniel ibis time." I'm and the c
1339.r mind, another time afraid Daniel ibis time." I'm and the children must be getting
1340.he children must be getting hungry by : will "And poor Tom, dinner, till too — I w
1341.t the Jenny 1" until you reminded me of Good bye evening (62 B J. A K E S AND FLANA6
1342.and he otherwise lockiug " every inch a man." Then there was Mr. Fitz- gibbon of lo
1343.ery excellent the place of the lamented man, and right worthy to Jeremiah Lauigan.
1344. with a smile ; " I hardly expected the honor of their company. it But may be all for
1345.nly throw a damp on our festivity." A FAMILY PARTY. 163 Conversation had been flowin
1346., according as inculcates he or she is, good or bad principles " it," Yes, sir, that
1347. a daughter, (no disparagement to the r mind !) if you had a son you might probably
1348. and O'Callaghan himself. Fitzgibbon, " one would H Really, Mr. Blake," said suppos
1349. teachers are not as fully competent to form the mind and cultivate the intellect as
1350. are not as fully competent to form the mind and cultivate the intellect as American
1351. FLANAGANS it is we to suppose that the religion of most Irish ? teachers to which you o
1352.ers to which you object Is it, sir, our religion or our nationality cies, — our Irish
1353.t make mean ; us unfit enlightening the mind I" ?— have the goodness to answer me,
1354. their infancy ' to do as the Romans do idea is, ; you understand me, v I hope ? My
1355. can't be Irishmen and Americans at the same time they must be either one or the oth
1356.t be Irishmen and Americans at the same time they must be either one or the other."
1357.ns at the same time they must be either one or the other." 11 1 beg your pardon, un
1358.ame time they must be either one or the other." 11 1 beg your pardon, uncle," said Ed
1359.living proof that your position a false one. was brought up, Irish I hope, in faith
1360.ly prepared to stand by this shedding I love great Republic, the land of the last dr
1361.s well as of my birth, but I cannot, or will not, forget Ire- pity the Irishman's so
1362.the highest and holiest feelings of our nature. my dear uncle, I am both Irish and Ame
1363. I am both Irish and American, and so I will continue, with God's help." " Give me y
1364. American, and so I will continue, with God's help." " Give me your hand, Edward al
1365.id O'Callaghan, n like you l have great pleasure my sentiments is added Fitzgibbon. " Yo
1366. sentiments is added Fitzgibbon. " Your mind rightly constituted, my young friend, a
1367.my young friend, and well-balanced. A t FAMILY PARTY. answer your nephew, 166 should l
1368. " I think he ought to be the very last man to speak in or rather anti-Catholic sch
1369.f he'd only speak observed his real — mind, he's as much against them as any of us
1370.e candid for once, and speak out like a man Are you or are you not in favor of mixe
1371.ng on Miles's brow. " I thiuk it's high time you were " ; all get- ting your feet in
1372.r that, or in a my uncle and aunt Blake will join you a?\d Scotch reel." it " Never
1373.'s Tom/ whispered Ellie at his elbow; a good while since father and mother danced an
1374.was instantaneous off went the two cou* many lapwings, all seemingly inspired by the
1375.take any excuse and I make her dance it will do her good, want to see you and her ha
1376.use and I make her dance it will do her good, want to see you and her having a share
1377. to-night, but for mother ; your sake I will, just to let you see that your mother t
1378.Mr. O'Callaghan, won't yon step I can't good example," wife standing up to out, too
1379.I never danced a step since poor John's death, will, and never it please God I ! Don'
1380. danced a step since poor John's death, will, and never it please God I ! Don't take
1381.John's death, will, and never it please God I ! Don't take it ill of me, sir, weren
1382.'d dance with you as soon as in the any one but it room. would, indeed, Mr. O'Calla
1383.lie scruples, and passed 01 Flanagan. A FAMILY PARTY. reel, 16} "Will you dance a a yo
1384.01 Flanagan. A FAMILY PARTY. reel, 16} "Will you dance a a younger partner, I Miss E
1385.rtner, I Miss Ellie ? I'm sorry I'm not man for your sake, but as I can find no oth
1386.man for your sake, but as I can find no other know you'll not be so cruel as to depri
1387.t be so cruel as to deprive an up ; old man of a dance for want of a partner." u is
1388.ght renown, By holding out to tire each other down." The fire reel was further animat
1389.t by a running of laughing comments and good-humored ejaculations from the dancers t
1390.nny Miles — keep — by it up for the honor of old Ballywalter." " That's ! the pow
1391.ehind if you don't stir yourself " Very good, indeed, Ellie !" said Mr. O'Callaghan
1392. well, too." Ellie only It was just her time to turn. smiled. " What an animating si
1393.e dance, seemingly forgetful of all the world besides and my mother —just I see how
1394. miling Yes, that is a sight which does one's he& good." " And my father," said Mar
1395.s, that is a sight which does one's he& good." " And my father," said Margaret, " wo
1396. if he were no more than twenty- " That will do, Tom, that will do !" cried Tim, swi
1397. than twenty- " That will do, Tom, that will do !" cried Tim, swingall tired, ing hi
1398.bected with that lively strain !" A " ' FAMILY PARTT. 16* Many thanks to you, Edward/'
1399.ively strain !" A " ' FAMILY PARTT. 16* Many thanks to you, Edward/' said his father
1400.s father gaily, I must say, was a happy one." was silent. She looked at her husband
1401.said Edward, " to let you play this but mind I play the next." doesn't Margaret play
1402.ay ?" said Mr. O'Callaghan. Oh her turn will come by and bye," said gentle M let her
1403.everything Irish. Tom Moore was, in his opinion, the first of modern poets His — in f
1404. fact, ancient or modern, there was not one who came 60 near Mr. O'Callaghan's idea
1405.t of the melodies with much feeling and good voice, taste. She played well, and had
1406. taste. She played well, and had a very good highly cultivated, for her father had s
1407.her father had spared no expense on her education, particularly as regarded music Taking
1408. a grace- 170 fal BLAKE8 AND FLANAGANS. same time : prelude, asking at the " What sh
1409.ace- 170 fal BLAKE8 AND FLANAGANS. same time : prelude, asking at the " What shall I
1410.uisite pathos, and Margaret's voice was one of thrilling sweetness. When the last f
1411.imidly u rip, " 1 belies X have a call. Will you favor us with a song ?" " Oh, certa
1412. ?" " Oh, certainly to sing. ; but some one must choose what I am Mother, will you
1413. some one must choose what I am Mother, will you " Sing that new song that you got l
1414. here," said she aside to her sister-in-law. know whether you ever heard it or not.
1415.piano, dusd song : " Of what is the old man thinking, At he leans on his oaken staf
1416.e merry laagh. But the tears of the old man flow, As he looks on the yoanjr and gaj
1417.tim« to the air they plfijr. — A The FAMILY PARTY. Ill elder around him are drinkin
1418. elder around him are drinking, But not one cup will he quaff Of what is the old ma
1419.round him are drinking, But not one cup will he quaff Of what is the old man thinkin
1420.ne cup will he quaff Of what is the old man thinking, As he leans on hie oaken staf
1421.spell in the air they play, And the old man's eyes are dim, For it calls up a past
1422.and gone? I it is. I can just fancy the good cannot old man leaning on his oaken sta
1423.s. I can just fancy the good cannot old man leaning on his oaken staff that venerab
1424.a tone of deep feeling, "may he rest in peace!" Amen P repeated all present, with the
1425.sually manifested on any subject " — "many a me by way " And many hints time he sh
1426.y subject " — "many a me by way " And many hints time he shook that same oaken sta
1427. — "many a me by way " And many hints time he shook that same oaken staff at of ge
1428.way " And many hints time he shook that same oaken staff at of gentle admonition !"
1429.aken staff at of gentle admonition !" a time he followed it up with some useful appl
1430.ke 11 V that's Now, Tom, not accustomed good-humor tates out of school." — " you k
1431.ND FLANAGANS. What ! not at any given ? time—say ten years after the events record
1432.ears after the events recorded Tell the truth now, Mike, do yoa forgive our old maste
1433.tment he gave you " 11 ?" From my heart God knows I do ! out I do it !" said Mike,
1434.warmly if — it was his all for my own good, and I had taken more of advice, and re
1435. longer, — straight ahead, whether we will or no. Come, I'll give you a song mysel
1436.ng of the Cannibal Islands," and by the time in it was finished there was not a grav
1437.ou The Wake of Teddy the Tiler,' to the same tune ?" " For goodness' sake, don't !"
1438.burg. As to Henry and Eliza names wen A FAMILY PARTY. even by their they would 173 par
1439.oldness towards them on the part of any one present, but the memory of the recent s
1440.on the part of any one present, but the memory of the recent slight so deliberately pu
1441.he purpose, and only served to make the truth more wife did all painfully manifest. T
1442.t of the parlor, in." Ever Susan had an idea that " Aunt Mary didn't u because the M
1443.elled at the Blakes, and she took right good car* to station herself so that they co
1444.r line were centered in her person. Her memory was ransacked for all the most honorabl
1445.f those present were descended from the same ancestral line, could well have dispens
1446.sent, or future. in Mrs. Reilly was her element, uplifted, as it were on the wings of m
1447.t, uplifted, as it were on the wings of memory was to a position of respectable height
1448. evening passed pleasantly away, and no one But, sensible of the lapse of time. 44
1449.nd no one But, sensible of the lapse of time. 44 Never does time travel faster Than
1450.ble of the lapse of time. 44 Never does time travel faster Than when his way lies am
1451.ps, Mr. and Mrs. Blake) dreamed cf it's being so it late. There was a general ex- cla
1452. ex- clamation that ed they must 41 was time to be moving, but Tim it," declar- all
1453.uld Lang Syr*. He ao ^ordingly sang the good old Scotch song 44 Good night an' joy b
1454.dingly sang the good old Scotch song 44 Good night an' joy be wl* ye a'." When he ca
1455.ld stagger or ehanoo to tap. — A I'll FAMILY PARTY 116 reach to you the helping han'
1456.ARTY 116 reach to you the helping han', Good night and joy be wi' ye a'," there was
1457. well pleased with themselves and every one else. Even Miles had unbent more than a
1458.ttle, and took his share of the " right good williewaught " meant to perpetuate the
1459.its of the Irish. Now *\ot I have great pleasure in stating that there was the slightest
1460. myself ?" "Oh! you sir, nothing in the world, father after dancing so 1" —only I I
1461. stairs, muttering as he weal " another time will do as well." AM OLD ACQUAINTANCE T
1462.rs, muttering as he weal " another time will do as well." AM OLD ACQUAINTANCE TURNS
1463. of the others. Now we would have great pleasure in accompanying Mrs. Reilly and her son
1464.t an having outwitted the landlord, and one of them, a strapping young fellow, in a
1465.orse-laugh, guess I done him slick that time, for all "I so wide-awake as he Jim ?"
1466. who'll try his ? fortune — it, — I will, for one !" 1" " Go old fellow cried bo
1467.y his ? fortune — it, — I will, for one !" 1" " Go old fellow cried both of his
1468.r ruffianly pursuers were behind. " For God's sake hurry on, children in 1" to a ru
1469. her head. " There's two of them," said one of the ruffians the fellow addressed as
1470.lick. Come 'un." along, we're three and one of them's an old so old as you think/'
1471., keeping his eye Bteadil; fixed on the other, in whom he had at once recognized an o
1472.won't you take my 11 young arm?" at the same time I say, catching the terrified girl
1473. you take my 11 young arm?" at the same time I say, catching the terrified girl by t
1474.r'e " for the wrong shop dear I" ! this time, my fine fellow !" Oh Mike said his mot
1475."let see, we're them if alone. Do, help God's sake Don't almost at home." fight " B
1476.ice. Jim, pitch into the old feller you one I do and, they're in for it now, Bill,
1477.ack against the wall and flourished his good stick. " I know you Hugh Dillon, and I'
1478. to know of old that 111 not b« by any one." The answer was a blow of Dillon's sle
1479.ous attack, and before he could make up mind what to do, Mike's stick came whirling
1480. and Annie. Mike hastened away, leaving one of the in Seevan- quished to look after
1481.he in Seevan- quished to look after the other, and just came up time to see his fathe
1482. look after the other, and just came up time to see his father dismissing the valian
1483.-servant, had been up waiting for them. mind wakening the men, Jenny !" said her hus
1484.before you came up, and that cooled his courage wonderfully. The rest was all smooth wa
1485.The rest was all smooth water." By this time the door was secured the mothsr and dau
1486.swords and guns in old times. It did us good service this very night. I hope you're
1487.t want to know him He's a nasty big bad man, that's what he is I" " Did yon know hi
1488.hear what you and he said to each 1 — Other ?" " Why, now, Dan," said Mrs. Sheridan
1489.enough in all conscience, but I hope in God he'll never come so low as that, eh, Mi
1490.rget I your goodness to me, and, please God, never will ! I'm bad enough at merrime
1491. goodness to me, and, please God, never will ! I'm bad enough at merriment, but time
1492.U A INT AN to B TURNS UP. 183 Thanks be God, it's no wcrse with us than Leaving Mik
1493.ith us than Leaving Mike to woo " tired Nature's sweet restorer," we will take a retro
1494.oo " tired Nature's sweet restorer," we will take a retrospective glance at the care
1495.which had brought Hugh Dillon to such a state of moral destitution. He was the only s
1496.he only son of a respectable and indusa man who was considered well-to-do trious ca
1497.ered well-to-do trious carpenter in the world, employed two or three journeymen, and
1498.dom without some contract. his wife His family consisted of and three children, the el
1499.less acquaintance, Hugh. dashing girls, one nineteen, and the other a year or two y
1500.h. dashing girls, one nineteen, and the other a year or two younger. Unhappily for th
1501.t the Common or Mixed Schools were John life much Dillon better calculated to promot
1502.ols. illiterate, was himself wholly and being rise, all his painfully conscious of hi
1503.ncy, and sensible of the he was deterat many disadvantages mined to give to which it
1504.to give to which it gave his children a good education any cost. Having once made up
1505.ve to which it gave his children a good education any cost. Having once made up his mind
1506.ation any cost. Having once made up his mind on the inferiority of Catholic, or, as
1507. and School where we finished first his education in the Ward saw him, and his sisters se
1508.outly protested against parental or any other ; called his father " a d ; old Irishma
1509.is very face and at twenty, cleared the one moonlight night with all ready money he
1510.e bad " done the governor brown" — in other words, left him penniless. It was not w
1511. left him penniless. It was not without many a struggle on the part of his parents t
1512., they had even " brought Dr. Power The good priest went, ; to reason cases with him
1513., ; because he thought he talked to his duty to go when asked soul from the and Hugh
1514. he talked to his duty to go when asked soul from the and Hugh ; with that mild dign
1515.y and persuasive eloquence which had of vice and error rest, won back many a ways an
1516.ch had of vice and error rest, won back many a ways and Hugh listened with apparent
1517. own " pray heaven he may die a natural death !" That was Dr. Power's last visit to H
1518.but was confoundedly bit the — Hugh's education did not end with I" Mr. Simpson's tuiti
1519. sown ; all his wild oats." Alas ! that time never came other than " wild oats." b'h
1520.wild oats." Alas ! that time never came other than " wild oats." b'hoys." Hugh Dillon
1521.llon He lived and never sowed any died "one of the When about nineteen, he bound hi
1522.ounging around the taverns, and, in due time, became a confirmed " meanest and most
1523.ngs. (Always excepting election when no man is worthless in the great Republic.) If
1524.Hugh Dillon had ever possessed heart or soul and Tim Flanagan always maintained that
1525. within him, gion he had none, the word honor was meaningless for him, and he knew no
1526. him, and he knew no Boner's tavern was other law than that of his own will. as Boner
1527.and he knew no Boner's tavern was other law than that of his own will. as Boner was
1528.vern was other law than that of his own will. as Boner was famous for keepone of his
1529. haunts, worthless of days, — — ing good liquor. Such had been the him at Mr. Si
1530. the him at Mr. Simpson's for his Irish life life of Hugh Dillon since we saw school
1531.him at Mr. Simpson's for his Irish life life of Hugh Dillon since we saw school, sne
1532.ss had marked out. The daughters of the family were just Dress was their one step abov
1533.of the family were just Dress was their one step above their brother no more. and b
1534.rse, on certain conditions, such as the being allowed to "dress as fine" as they wish
1535.lating library, to- gether with various other mention. little matters too numerous to
1536.s to fulfilled These conditions all (in other words, they having their said to be " n
1537.elf — Hugh Dillon, —and ; was in no other, who lay there own proper person then c
1538.trait on the present occasion, and when memory began to resume her functions, came wit
1539.ut around neither Mike Sheridan nor any one else was to be seen, and the cold But n
1540.tched heart of that houseless, homeless man. " Where can they have gone to ?" he as
1541.thinking of his trusty comrades. number one !" He was making the best of his way ba
1542.! " I guess they're minding were a dead man !" " If I'm not, I needn't thank you !"
1543.r all you cared you looked after number one " !" mean of you, Dillon do you know th
1544.ost always ! 1 ! " Well, gets it on the other end of him indicated I" Sure enough, Bi
1545.arm your hearts with some of his number one. That's let's " — the stuff for broke
1546.'s " — the stuff for broken " I guess will it down courage won't heal my arm ever
1547.stuff for broken " I guess will it down courage won't heal my arm ever I get !" !" !
1548.for my eye on him again, I'll him — I will, by feller " Ail right, old responded D
1549.d Dillon, as they gained the door. " It will go hard with I two of let us, if we a d
1550.e rear of Bill's premises well, ; never mind, that's twice he floored for the it me
1551.xpects "But said Bill, wasn't the young man that I had to do with,'' " it was the o
1552.hands we leave him. we to get back to " other men and other scenes." And yet the cour
1553. him. we to get back to " other men and other scenes." And yet the course of our narr
1554.e course of our narrative brings us but one step higher in the moral order. — THE
1555.eakfast was ready. Miles was in no very good humor, and told his wife not " my heart
1556.making any reply. " What in the name of good" It's a shame ness kept you so late V s
1557., I I ; intention of joining the little family-circle on that par- ticular morning. Pa
1558.ly put on his hat and sallied forth, no one knew whither, except himself, and, perh
1559.ot alt<* gether pleasing to him, at the same time threatening to torn mm : My Dear M
1560.t<* gether pleasing to him, at the same time threatening to torn mm : My Dear Mother
1561. respect, that I would much rather per* form that office mvself than have him or any
1562.that office mvself than have him or any one else do it for me. Wishing you both a g
1563.e else do it for me. Wishing you both a good appetite for your breakfast, although 1
1564.ll back, pale as the father and mother. death, in her chair, and her husband had to r
1565. to the window, in order to conceal his emotion Eliza looked from one to the other ; sh
1566.o conceal his emotion Eliza looked from one to the other ; she thought of their lon
1567.is emotion Eliza looked from one to the other ; she thought of their long years of de
1568.on, and sacrifices tender care ; of the many ; which they had made for Henry and in
1569. her neck, and begged of her to be Come will to your breakfast, pa, dear I" said she
1570.breakfast, pa, dear I" said she, " ; it will be quite cold ma, do not take on I gues
1571.I'm sure tire of Henry be back soon. he will soon boarding out, and you shall see hi
1572.with disrespect. Whe- ther she kept her good resolution remains to be seeu, But, les
1573. place, which we do not is " paved with good resolutions." Sin! gular paving-stones
1574. not is " paved with good resolutions." Sin! gular paving-stones for such a place I
1575.some important in business. '• Before matter hand," said Blake, " let me inform you
1576. changed quarters this morning. The old man spoke to me in such a way it ; last eve
1577. tell no longer put up with and, to the truth, I feel old couple ; much their better
1578. ?" said Zachary, " For the present you will find me at Mrs. Delmaiae s all " At eve
1579. start where we may. But what about the other affair ?" " Oh that's all settled. The
1580.ried ; Blake, laughing is ; I object to one of your terms is Mr. Miles Blake I no m
1581. Blake I no more my governor than he of slavery from off yours. shook the dust my feet
1582.orning, and stand before " you a " free man." of Dr. But what Power ?" laughed Zach
1583.osed to secret V ! u Oh as to that, Dr. will affairs, nor I go out of Power never co
1584.in the profession, if I possibly can, I will leave no means untried. If joining your
1585.f-past eight. you V* you please — you will find me ready." came Thomson, and as th
1586. sort of liking " Oh, of course !" Mike good-hearted " fellow as ever lived." said H
1587.w as ever lived." said Henry laughing ; good nature which he is, I believe, a ; char
1588.ever lived." said Henry laughing ; good nature which he is, I believe, a ; characteris
1589.f the genus Paddy all — as thoroughly life, as he had fed on potatoes his and made
1590.l how ; 1 true it may be ; I've not had time to inquire 1 tell the tale as 'twas tol
1591.As for Mike, he's a brave fellow, and I honor him I do so. now, make up your mind, my
1592. I honor him I do so. now, make up your mind, my good But here we are friend, for a
1593.him I do so. now, make up your mind, my good But here we are friend, for a solemn sc
1594.I — — , ask to be admitted a member will. of that time-honored order, whose powe
1595.k to be admitted a member will. of that time-honored order, whose power " Quite so "
1596.staff to lean on > — how / felt after being admitted." " Well, I can't say I feel s
1597.d the Rubi- con, declared myself a free man, as far as the priests are concerned, a
1598.t be yow then it is also mine." to hear will it. " I am happy Father Come in new and
1599.at measure, to his own success in busi- being a Freemason, and beneficial to he was q
1600.tage of having an enlightened, educated man envy you." for a father ; I can almost
1601.ng a Freemason, hit visit was surprised one evening by a fair friend, from Mr. Pear
1602.! Your son, Mr. Blake has been for some time past paying attention to my daughter, a
1603.ction, I my daughter seems to have your opinion before matters are brought to a close."
1604.l what they ought to say, ; to tell the truth, both were completely stunned Eliza cam
1605. Pearson, that you must leave them I'll time to arrange their thoughts in speaking o
1606.tertained the very highest respect your family, and would be but too happy to have dea
1607.e dear Jane Eliza here told part of the truth for a daughter." the whole — she took
1608.ole — she took —not tuous manner in good care to suppress the contempwhich her b
1609.ken of the the father, " but I parental judgment. " That is all true enough," said tfiin
1610.ere brought up us, children a different world altogether. With lived, were children a
1611. in old times — at least in the ! Old World, but this is the is New World, of our a
1612.the ! Old World, but this is the is New World, of our age. my good sir You must full
1613.his is the is New World, of our age. my good sir You must full and independence the
1614.espects you and your I have no doubt he good lady quite as much as mot* A Mi RRI A G
1615.little of your daughter, sir, for she's good enough for any man in New York city, bu
1616.ter, sir, for she's good enough for any man in New York city, but I want my son to
1617.king fools of us by sending you, or any one If he else." II Mr. Pearyou say \ Is th
1618.pike-staff." — that's as plain as a " God help us anyhow !" said the poor mother
1619. ; " it's little comfort we have in the same boy himself — but maybe he'll come no
1620.D FLANAGANS. more than once, for he did love Henry dearly, and wag proud of him, wit
1621. no usein talking, stand as well as any one mother and myself can see how matters e
1622.Eliza —your pose, you'll be doing the same, as soon as chance." Eliza blushed like
1623.e, you'll be doing the same, as soon as chance." Eliza blushed like scarlet, you get t
1624. her head, saying, (when he was in very good humor ha you know my way, always called
1625.s, Lizzy, dear — Dry up I'll that's a good if girl, and not say another word about
1626. bit she just better than Henry, if the truth were known thinks as little of us as he
1627. and wants to keep a smooth face on the matter. ! ; It's little comfort we'll ever hav
1628. soothingly '* an old saying and a true one, it that sorrow is time enough when com
1629.aying and a true one, it that sorrow is time enough when comes. Things may turn out
1630.at Edward Flanagan lent "Did you me the Life — see of Lord Edward Fitzgerald ?" "
1631.the book, and his wife heard him sigh " God help you, poor man 1" said she to herhe
1632.ife heard him sigh " God help you, poor man 1" said she to herheavily. self, as she
1633. might look better to consult " the old man," he made his appear- 800 ance in SLAKE
1634.m at the parlor door, glancing at the : same time towards their father, as much as t
1635.the parlor door, glancing at the : same time towards their father, as much as to say
1636.g the enamored aspirant all for his : " Love is very well — so is law, in its own
1637.for his : " Love is very well — so is law, in its own time and place, but depend
1638. is very well — so is law, in its own time and place, but depend upon it, Henry, t
1639. like is money, especially when a young man temple of Hymen. about to enter the Mon
1640.e in society. Go to the He's Irish, old man, then, and rub him down smoothly. you k
1641. him a touch of the blarney, Henry that will soften his — — heart !" Acting ©n
1642.il he had prepared the way by an hour's good conduct. Many a significant glance had
1643.ared the way by an hour's good conduct. Many a significant glance had passed between
1644.know now ! ?" I was waiting to have the matter definitively settled before I troubled
1645.d loving son, and we'll not forget your good conduct in haste. say ?" Eh, Mary, what
1646.at do you a hurt at " Well, to tell the truth, I was little first, but then I got ove
1647.dently struggling ally it was well-nigh evil colorless. He to keep in his anger, and
1648.ded in putting down the spirit, hope of being soon able to " pay as he said to bimsel
1649.nversation brought Indeed, there wai if good bank-stock. the matter to a satisfactor
1650.deed, there wai if good bank-stock. the matter to a satisfactory footing. hardly an ob
1651.o be surmounted, trifling we except the one of religion ; and that, when raised by
1652.rmounted, trifling we except the one of religion ; and that, when raised by Mrs. Blake,
1653.ry's assurance that Jane was not at all particular about religion in fact, she would almos
1654.at Jane was not at all particular about religion in fact, she would almost as soon go to
1655.not, he said, the smallest doubt as any other. but she would become a Catholic as soo
1656. poor simple woman, ; — speaking How good faith herself in she never dreamed of a
1657.drobe little all uext day. it, When the time came, or rather a before Eliza was affl
1658.ctual. Eliza's greatest trouble was the necessity of disappointing " poor Jane." She trie
1659.not hear of such a thing. ° Well, what will you say, ma, if Jane sends for us ?" "
1660.ends for us ?" " Say why, I'll tell the truth, to be sure. There's their instruments
1661.ure. There's their instruments — ! no other excuse wanted." Accordingly, when Jane
1662.egan danger." there was a great deal of truth in the old proverb, " AlV* not lo:t tha
1663.rriage was on the tapis, Mrs. Blake was one day surprised by a visit from Dr. Power
1664.ve was about that Jane cares nothing at religion, and my son tells us all about religion
1665.religion, and my son tells us all about religion. She'd as soon be a Catholic as anythin
1666. person who rarely, cares nothing about religion. Such persons are or if ever converted.
1667.uch persons are or if ever converted. A man attached to any system of religion woma
1668.verted. A man attached to any system of religion woman who is really may be supposed to
1669.y be supposed to ; have a certain fixed idea of saving his or her soul and, If once
1670.certain fixed idea of saving his or her soul and, If once convinced that salvation c
1671.brace the the pale of a certain Church, will truth when is it is once presented to t
1672. the the pale of a certain Church, will truth when is it is once presented to them, a
1673.hat, 11 something worse." us. Lord save life Father one. Power ! you're enough to fr
1674.thing worse." us. Lord save life Father one. Power ! you're enough to frighten the
1675., my dear Mrs. Blake, but I have had so many opportunities, one way and another, of
1676., but I have had so many opportunities, one way and another, of sounding yo^r sou's
1677.st hope of making any impression on his mind. Could not you or a poor resource. his
1678.l retract, so I have only to wish you a good morning. When sorrow comes, as come it
1679. morning. When sorrow comes, as come it will, you know where to find me. Tf I could
1680.where to find me. Tf I could do you any good by coming to see you, I would come ofte
1681.e often ; but, unfortunately, I cannot. Good morning." He say. was gone before Mrs.
1682.hough her reason, and were both in what religion she had, open rebellion as ; but as she
1683.ble journals would say the altar of the world, represented by the comto is, Power had
1684.rave, and even sad, was the face of the good priest, for he knew that the marriage w
1685.could already detect the dark clouds of sin and sorrow gather* ing over the devoted
1686.E. 20"} going on, but, of course, their knowledge came to them with an they were none of
1687." can't turn in our skin for them Never mind, Mary," replied her brother 1 I have we
1688. " ; it doesn't ghe us much concern. If God spares us we'll have a wedding of our o
1689." returned Tim, gravely. Ah then, never mind him, Mary," said Mrs. Flanagan, with he
1690.. Flanagan, with her quiet smile, " the man's only making fun of you." " Well, but
1691.a little money to get. They say the old man has something by him 1" " Something by
1692.now very well that couldn't hope Edward will get somecomes tc thing handsome with th
1693.ith a sly glanc« I didn't say that But mind Edward was his going to be married, or
1694.ctures. not have Mr. Fitzgibbon." Every one laughed at Susan's childlike declaratio
1695.mors afloat k till we're sure the thing will take place." ; know it will take place,
1696.e the thing will take place." ; know it will take place," said Tim, positively " Don
1697. your way straight before you." Evening being come, and supper over, Tim got up and t
1698.lose if know what in you'r« fear, with God's help, nothing by this change I shall
1699. fear, with God's help, nothing by this change I shall my condition less Even I do bec
1700.rthily discharge the duties of whatever state I may embrace" These words produced an
1701.r and most dutiful son —a son who had life for so and the true, bitterness in many
1702.life for so and the true, bitterness in many long years been the comfort of her prid
1703.he knew Edward's words his affectionate sense wife, too, were her and that she could
1704. were her and that she could rely on of duty. The whom his. he was about to take, wa
1705. as this on the wedding-day, ! Margaret will be apt to com- Out with you here, or I
1706.ou." Edward came both left out laughing good humoredly, and they the house together.
1707.e to face on the with you, " What's the matter my poor woman ?" Mrs. Dillon started wh
1708.ear, is it here I have you ? what's the matter with me, there's is it ? Oh ! indeed, i
1709. my heart this night. Sure that in poor man of mine is lying for death, and I was r
1710.e that in poor man of mine is lying for death, and I was rites asking Dr. Power to co
1711.asking Dr. Power to come and give " For death repeated Tim. " him the I trust of the
1712.d as that with him — in poor John our many a pleasant hour we spent " together you
1713., to get from her 9 wr son about 11 his God help you in — own God father." help y
1714.on about 11 his God help you in — own God father." help you that's all /can say."
1715.etched woman and I away out of the city God only knows where " But what the world w
1716.ity God only knows where " But what the world will ; I do, — ; haven't a dollar bet
1717.d only knows where " But what the world will ; I do, — ; haven't a dollar between
1718., — ; haven't a dollar between me and death, except dollar bill this two- that Fath
1719.es happen, Mrs. Dillon," trembling with emotion, " you'll find plenty of his voice woma
1720.ce woman. friends, take my word for it. Good 1" night, and may God comfort your affl
1721. my word for it. Good 1" night, and may God comfort your afflicted heart Mrs. Dillo
1722.er the want of a friend, or the want of God's blessing she added, in a hoarse sepul
1723.h his 212 BLAKES A I* D FLANAGAN'S. the family are all beniguant smile. health. " I ho
1724.ll beniguant smile. health. " I hope in good to God," replied Tim had something part
1725.uant smile. health. " I hope in good to God," replied Tim had something particular
1726.good to God," replied Tim had something particular to say to your reverence, but we'll not
1727., but we'll not detain you now. Another time will do at Pray be seated." "We're all
1728. we'll not detain you now. Another time will do at Pray be seated." "We're all well,
1729.ld us it Tim, eagerly. " But how in the world does band are so miserably poor happen
1730.were quite comfortable." " Sickness, my good friend ; sickness has exhausted Poor Di
1731.ss his hands. expended when nothing was being added to it, and so the poor old couple
1732.le have gradually come to the destitute state in which you find them." their little m
1733.t " know what that vagabond deserves !" God forgive him his sins !" said the priest
1734. for him, if my sorrow could do him any good. The poor old woman is much troubled ab
1735.er from — "tell me that if it pleases God to call poor John away now, him. he'll
1736.decent a funeral as we can give all his life ; He was a good-hearted fellow besides,
1737. as we can give all his life ; He was a good-hearted fellow besides, A MARRIAGE. 213
1738.tholic, and he must have a Edward and I will see after it ourselves." what 1 would e
1739. speaking for the opportunity." first time " ; we can wait for another The Doctor
1740.you Edward," is said he, " although the time I doubted your is The business on which
1741.ct your reverence," said Tim " ; it's a matter that everbody knows to be no joke. reve
1742.further postponement. I can give you my opinion in half a dozen words. Margaret O'Calla
1743.ife I would have chosen for Edward this matter, Flanagan. approbation This is my answe
1744.nts waiting for my you have it, and may God bless you all the ; days of your life !
1745.ay God bless you all the ; days of your life ! — Good night, my worthy friends. I
1746.s you all the ; days of your life ! — Good night, my worthy friends. I must hasten
1747. holy gion to that poor, destitute, old man." reli- Dr, Power then threw of mercy,
1748. AN IRISH FUNERAL. 91ft CHAPTER ftLIAL LOVE Xm —AN IRISH FUNERAL. set out very ea
1749.he localities. For months past the sole family had been the earnings of the youngest d
1750.t the whole burden upon her shoulders." justice, she did to do her what she could to ma
1751.but groaning and crying, and takall ing medicine, and that," so poor Hannah found more i
1752.ad of a heavy basket, she found the old man in a feverish slumber, his eyes half op
1753.e of her suffering husband. 11 Bless my soul, Mrs Dillon ! what's come over you ?" s
1754. be so down-hearted altogether, though, God knows, if ?'• hard for you to be " ot
1755. sit won't you down — though And this world. But a poor place for the like of you.
1756.day I had as comfortable a house as any one could put thiir foot in, but that day i
1757.etting or repining, Mrs. Dillon j t?try one has their turn of prosperity. Your turn
1758.if AN IRISH FUNERAL never comes in this world, it 217 it may little be just as well f
1759. it may little be just as well for your soul. God sends you these troubles because h
1760.y little be just as well for your soul. God sends you these troubles because he wan
1761.because he wants to detach you from the world." She had been unpacking the basket whi
1762.pot, so let us make a for fire put down one of them to make some soup John." Mrs. D
1763.fe and to help, not to cry. By some the time the old man awoke, had a cup of the sou
1764.p, not to cry. By some the time the old man awoke, had a cup of the soup ready for
1765.ve you, would be a poor joke to talk of God and has raised up good friends for us w
1766.r joke to talk of God and has raised up good friends for us when it. we least expect
1767.k for the chicken-soup, not So speak of other nice things that she brought for yea. M
1768.a Flanagan. The next turn prepare I get will be the last one. May God : me for that
1769.ext turn prepare I get will be the last one. May God : me for that hour he said, ra
1770.prepare I get will be the last one. May God : me for that hour he said, raising hia
1771.y oh sure, I forgot Since ! I did ! — God He — ! — oh ! I did help me ! I wis
1772.ood looking alternately at him and each other. if Suddenly starting, as turned to his
1773.I can't die his I tell him what's on my mind Maybe his 1 with that heavy load on my
1774. Maybe his 1 with that heavy load on my soul ! father's last words might touch his h
1775.his heart, ! and !" put him he said, in mind of own poor 1 soul — oh ! that soul i
1776. put him he said, in mind of own poor 1 soul — oh ! that soul in a hoarse whisper,
1777.n mind of own poor 1 soul — oh ! that soul in a hoarse whisper, " that unfortunate
1778. hoarse whisper, " that unfortunate oh, soul that I have to answer for Oh, God ? God
1779. oh, soul that I have to answer for Oh, God ? God let ! won't per- you have pity on
1780.oul that I have to answer for Oh, God ? God let ! won't per- you have pity on me an
1781. fretting about that unfor 1 tunate boy time." God will bring him round in his ow^ "
1782.ng about that unfor 1 tunate boy time." God will bring him round in his ow^ " The s
1783.bout that unfor 1 tunate boy time." God will bring him round in his ow^ " The sick m
1784.l bring him round in his ow^ " The sick man turned upon her almost ! fiercely. ! wi
1785.an turned upon her almost ! fiercely. ! will not bring him round I tell you no — n
1786. to hia ; manage, and •oul I have his death upon me — the death of — I have, Be
1787.•oul I have his death upon me — the death of — I have, Betsy ; you needn't look
1788.and we're both suffering for now. here- God after, grant that we mayn't have to suf
1789.g, what canH be cured must be endured ? will of Just make up your mind to do the our
1790. be endured ? will of Just make up your mind to do the our Blessed Mother to protect
1791.to do the our Blessed Mother to protect God while you're in the world, let that bu
1792.ther to protect God while you're in the world, let that bu long or short — pray to
1793.John, pray for tLe grace to die a happy death. Leave the rest to God. Don't let — G
1794.to die a happy death. Leave the rest to God. Don't let — God and me hear another
1795.h. Leave the rest to God. Don't let — God and me hear another word about " Well,
1796.Celia. Oh I could only get I me " I for one half-hour Betsy will ! Hugh it's that h
1797.ly get I me " I for one half-hour Betsy will ! Hugh it's that he must come and see w
1798.l ! Hugh it's that he must come and see will, me — them all to listen you go and t
1799. — them all to listen you go and tell will you ?" John !" 1 if you wish ?" it, but
1800.long ?" you come back her thin, — but mind and don't over her Mrs. Dillon threw fa
1801.ked only by the low moaning of the sick man, and his occasional glances towards the
1802.anagan looked at the on his wife as old man. He had his eye fixed though trying to
1803. — tell me at once, you don't mean to will me?" "Oh him " ?" ! Mrs. Flanagan, dear
1804.him before I died He asked me — oh !" God for help you and me me had you any mone
1805.ey in him him coming. " That's I've — God ! — — he asked was no use do !" V i
1806.im this day, as I enough said the old ! man, in an altered tone; at 1 heard the wor
1807. altered tone; at 1 heard the worst now Death may come now any time. Oh Jesus, I my l
1808.rd the worst now Death may come now any time. Oh Jesus, I my last agony ! Mary and J
1809.f but there's two of them gone now. old man. Oh ! Holy Mary, Mother !" God, don't y
1810.now. old man. Oh ! Holy Mary, Mother !" God, don't you desert me, or I'm lost for e
1811.. " keep 221 it warm on the stove." The other nodded assent, and shook the kind hand
1812.rticulate a word. Bending over the sick man, Mrs. Flanagan said John, " till in a l
1813.id John, " till in a low voice, I'll '* God be with you, I see you again. be back w
1814.in. be back with Tim in the evening." " God spare was the fervent reply you over yo
1815.rvent reply you over your children, and good children they are If we meet no more in
1816.ren they are If we meet no more in this world, pray for me, Mrs. Flanagan the prayers
1817.prayers of the just are valuable before God !" God bless you," ; ! — 11 Why, sure
1818. of the just are valuable before God !" God bless you," ; ! — 11 Why, surely, you
1819.a forced smile. you'll live this " With God's off. help, many felt Dillon shook his
1820.ou'll live this " With God's off. help, many felt Dillon shook his head. He knew In
1821.shook his head. He knew In the and that death was not far evening, when Tim Flanagan
1822.oor dwelling of the Dillons, they found death before them. A few of the neighbors, me
1823.sation with a certain Watty Sullivan, a particular acquaintance of her brother's. Both Tim
1824.d his wife were shocked to find the old man dead, but Mrs. Flanagan said within her
1825.ong, for her kind convinced her that in God had dealt mercifully poor John taking h
1826. mercifully poor John taking him from a world where he had nothing to expect hours at
1827.!" for the funeral as soon as I can." " God reward you, Mr. Flanagan ejaculation wa
1828.ave all to you, Mr. Flanagan !" ! After God, youVe the only hope I have " Mother !"
1829. Hannah Dillon, with a flushed cheek, " one would think you were a beggar. It's rea
1830.s real mean of you to talk so " !" Ah ! God help me, Hannah there's 1 I'm mean enou
1831.particularly agreeable, she changed for one more to her Sheridan. " liking, asking
1832.ing Watty if he knew Mike What ! Hugh's same.'' old acquaintance ?" " 11 The very Ye
1833.nk, he was quite this sorry for the old man, and promised to come back evening with
1834. they're Ihej don't ever do things like other people." " Next morning Tim Flanagan an
1835. respective breakfasts. as they said, a good forenoon's work to before them, and the
1836.s work to before them, and there was no time be lost. "And said wish we may be able
1837.the way which he brought up grieved hi? family. For my in part, I'm heart sorry for th
1838.h me him dying such wretched poverty, a man still that saw so well off not many yea
1839.y, a man still that saw so well off not many years ago ; but and Tim, I'm afraid tha
1840.int out in the " won fair lady. name of God. Lord girls Remember that. Let us step
1841.nice penny for ooor Mrs. Dillon, that," will leave after paying all expenses." " God
1842.ill leave after paying all expenses." " God be praised for " there's not a woman in
1843.ake some dinner with us." " I believe I will," replied honest Dan. Tim and myself ha
1844.r of eating now than I was at breakfast-time." " Pooh, pooh, man, you're too easy ca
1845.I was at breakfast-time." " Pooh, pooh, man, you're too easy cast down. I think tel
1846.y. Isn't it the greatest comfort in the world to have the us, boys so near If our tha
1847.we can see them whenever we else like ? good bishop never did anything It but get up
1848.hal we'd do only for him, he has such a good memory." " And such a good head altoget
1849.e'd do only for him, he has such a good memory." " And such a good head altogether, an
1850.e has such a good memory." " And such a good head altogether, and such a good heart,
1851.such a good head altogether, and such a good heart," said Dan, warmly • "his memor
1852. good heart," said Dan, warmly • "his memory's only the least has done his part of h
1853.s goodness. him, and no mistake." It is God own share for needless to say that neit
1854.er Tim nor Nelly dis- sented from Dan's opinion. The voice that praised their bon was m
1855.as music to their hearts. John Dillon's death, the house was filled with people come
1856.as collected, waiting for the appointed time. Within the house all was silent, the s
1857.duced the latter effect, nearly were of one mind, and the general tone of the con-
1858.d the latter effect, nearly were of one mind, and the general tone of the con- versa
1859.rybody looked round to see what was the matter. Several voices said, in smothered acce
1860.urning th« B I. AKES AND FLANAGANS own mind. People held their breata. After a whil
1861.eople held their breata. After a while, matter over in in his expectation, almost drea
1862.omposedly, say- ing : " I guess the old man is gone at last — is ain't he ?" Most
1863.ople were too much disgusted to answer, one young fellow, a stout 'longshoreman, qu
1864. You must ; keep your score for another time, my hearty," said the stalwart Tipperar
1865.my hearty," said the stalwart Tipperary man, with the cool" bottle up your anger, m
1866.w est composure — this is neither the time nor the place to settle a reply, ! quar
1867.the crowd Hush The hearse had been some time corpse !" A. " waiting. his hard, coffi
1868.iven him a black eye for certain had no mind to follow. unhappy young man, and come
1869.in had no mind to follow. unhappy young man, and come a certain change over good ad
1870.. unhappy young man, and come a certain change over good advice which he Many an eye w
1871.ung man, and come a certain change over good advice which he Many an eye was fixed o
1872.ertain change over good advice which he Many an eye was fixed on the it was said tha
1873.ich Mike was did not refuse, though, if truth must be told, he looked as though he wi
1874. ?" Where are you going to bury the old man " In the Catholic burying-ground, in El
1875.Dillon. it, be sorry to send you or any one else where you're after 6ending us ness
1876.er without you, and we'll do tian, with God's help. He died a Chrisof and he shaK h
1877. made an !" example of before he leaves world " If there's a God as he above, he'll s
1878.f before he leaves world " If there's a God as he above, he'll suffer both here and
1879.s unfortuIt was, nate mother and sister being placed in a hackney-coach immediately a
1880.height prosperity. was a characteristic one, and highly creditable to the warm-hear
1881.d the oppressed of his sight I, for The one, cannot but respect the feeling which g
1882.ndly feelings " inherent in their Irish nature. Even though the stranger It is may sne
1883.o every genuine Irish heart. there werr many "intelligent persons ' at it poor John
1884.NS — AN IRISH FUNERAL. 229 at had any one even hinted that the demonstration was
1885.ed that the demonstration was all Every man to his taste, America have surely a rig
1886.ere be, it is all their own they ask no one U indecorous or un-Catholic. I. gay The
1887.ions increased seventy-five in Hannah's love of dress increased due proportion, and
1888.nd she gave her mother neither rest uor peace till she bought her a handsome suit of
1889.." As About a month after John Dillon's death, his widow came to Tim Flanagan's one a
1890.death, his widow came to Tim Flanagan's one afternoon, her eyes red with weeping. "
1891.yes red with weeping. " Why, what's the matter with you, Mrs. Dillon/ " 230 Inquired *
1892.gh. Still it's hard, very hard, to have one's own child deny the mother that bore h
1893. my daughter Celia walking with a young man. She was so gaily dressed that I had to
1894.rras, and called out !' ' Celia, Celia, God be praised that ! I see you again and w
1895.nd when the young away from me, as if I man asked who that woman V she told him I w
1896.h ! not at what she so they left called good-bye, Mrs. Mullin' — — — see you s
1897. out a crying, and I think that done me good, for I got stronger every minute, and w
1898. Then I came straight on here to you my good to me, after all, in giving me such kiu
1899.hiuk it prudent to express all trouble. God is she felt on hearing this sorrowful s
1900. the clouds and beyond the tomb,' where sin and sorrow are alike unknown. Gradually
1901.rnal anguish, nice fresh it, and by the time Mrs. Flanagan had made a tea, cup of an
1902.illon felt " as she had been in another world," phrase. tell to borrow her own homely
1903.t's true, she'll not six o'clock. Well, God be with you, Mrs. Flanagan, you've as m
1904.dy was exceedingly modest, and kept the matter as secret as possible. Strange to say,
1905.ossible. Strange to say, that, for some time, her father was her only confidant, and
1906.ll it she had ascertained his favorable opinion of Edward, that she consented to receiv
1907.r tastes, their predilections, were the same they had grown up together under the sa
1908.me they had grown up together under the same religious training they had learned the
1909.g they had learned the catechism in the same church, heard from childhood up the sam
1910.ame church, heard from childhood up the same religious instructions, and received th
1911. and received the sacraments before the same altar. Their life had run for years and
1912.sacraments before the same altar. Their life had run for years and years in the same
1913.life had run for years and years in the same course. Even in their love for Ireland,
1914.years in the same course. Even in their love for Ireland, they had still another bon
1915.GAN'S. still 233 fresn and green in her memory. the heart's core, and had rejected the
1916.dresses of She was Irish to more : than one admirer because they were not of her ow
1917.cate Celtic features, her lithe elastic form, of grace and symmetry, her blue eyes,
1918.d her dark auburn hair. But better than soul, warm, loving heart, and her pure was h
1919.h was quite agreeable to Edward. As the time appointed for the wedding drew near, al
1920. maidenly modesty of future daughter-in-law, with his arch looks and sly hints. Man
1921.law, with his arch looks and sly hints. Many were the " Nods, and winks, nnd wreath'
1922., until Edward would sometimes : with a good-humored " Well, father, than you do, re
1923.r to I you don't spare our blushes more will carry Margaret off bodilv, and if the p
1924. Margaret, and tell Tim to be off and : mind his business — if he had any. " And E
1925.." Tim was "bound joke over to keep the peace " — which he would scrupulously do un
1926.he gladdened earth, and the of balm. of life Both Edward and Margaret had been to co
1927.g couple. It was a beautiful sight, and one that was long remembered with pleasure
1928., and one that was long remembered with pleasure by all those who were present on the oc
1929.outhful pair ministry had whom his made one. And to you, my worthy : friends," said
1930.st as much right congratulate you. Your will, children have entered upon a trust, in
1931.have entered upon a trust, increase new state, which I both their happiness and yours
1932. increase new state, which I both their happiness and yours. You now form but one family.
1933.both their happiness and yours. You now form but one family. Your fortunes are hence
1934.r happiness and yours. You now form but one family. Your fortunes are henceforward
1935.ppiness and yours. You now form but one family. Your fortunes are henceforward bound u
1936. henceforward bound up together. in the love and fear ; You have brought up your chi
1937.ght up your children you have done your duty of God ; by them you have society, and,
1938.our children you have done your duty of God ; by them you have society, and, in so
1939.ing, you have laid up a store of fitted happiness for your own declining years. In their
1940. for your own declining years. In their virtue and you have the surest guarantee for t
1941.ave the surest guarantee for the future peace and prosperity of the whole family. God
1942.uture peace and prosperity of the whole family. God bless you all, aud may you live to
1943.ace and prosperity of the whole family. God bless you all, aud may you live togethe
1944.less you all, aud may you live together many, many their affection years, in the enj
1945.ou all, aud may you live together many, many their affection years, in the enjoyment
1946. in the enjoyment of every blessing ! I will now you good-morning, as I have to make
1947.ment of every blessing ! I will now you good-morning, as I have to make before any o
1948.d-morning, as I have to make before any one comes to interrupt me." bid my meditati
1949.n need of our breakfast I, — know for one, am. As for Edward and Margaret there,
1950. elders of the families followed in two other The whole party breakfasted merry time
1951.other The whole party breakfasted merry time they had of ding-party amongst joyous.
1952.empty compliments and regrets for Thank God we can enjoy ourthose who value them.
1953. they're staying away, for, to tell the truth, they'd only throw a damp on the whole
1954.n astonishing her Irish friends. at the good style in She had herself been somewhat
1955. it was something new, and Eliza had an idea that be quite a droll affair. must It i
1956.tivals ; but still she would try it for one evening, even at the risk of being bore
1957.it for one evening, even at the risk of being bored to death. It would be a Eliza ric
1958.ing, even at the risk of being bored to death. It would be a Eliza rich scene to have
1959. to describe ever after. So made up her mind to oblige her mother and Uncle the ball
1960.fore the year is out. What do yon bay ? will you back me ?" it'i " No, iudeed, he wi
1961.ll you back me ?" it'i " No, iudeed, he will not, Tim," cried Mrs. Reilly; " only fo
1962. with a sly wink at O'Callaghan, his my opinion," said who lay back in " arm-chair enjo
1963.Malone, who was won by the blarney of ' One Lucius O'Brien from Clare, !' How quare
1964.ade ; or she laughed as heartily as any one present. general call on Tim to finish
1965. present. general call on Tim to finish good sense prevailed, and There was a the so
1966.ent. general call on Tim to finish good sense prevailed, and There was a the song (fo
1967.e had never heard of such a tune. Every one and mother, understood the comical grav
1968.resaid tune with the vulgar name, every one declaring it " a fine eld tune,* though
1969. " a fine eld tune,* though, to say the truth, few of them had ever heard of it thems
1970.formal bow, and said was certainly rery good of her to patronize their o.d nationali
1971.GE PARTY. " I 231 hope," said ho, " you will be able to play Garry the Owen by Mrs.
1972. be able to play Garry the Owen by Mrs. time our wedding-day comes round ? — eh, R
1973.her. It's all very well when there's no one but ourselves present, but I declare to
1974. strangers. There never was a widow our family that married a second time, to my knowl
1975. widow our family that married a second time, to my knowledge, except it my Aunt Peg
1976.amily that married a second time, to my knowledge, except it my Aunt Peggy, and every one
1977.dge, except it my Aunt Peggy, and every one knows how badly her." turned out with E
1978.s how badly her." turned out with Every one did not know, but every one chose to fo
1979. with Every one did not know, but every one chose to for fear appear as though they
1980. Even as it was, Mrs. Reilly company an idea of the height from which her Aunt Peggy
1981.d to enter the temple of Hymen a second time, and that with Barfor her ! ney Fogarty
1982.arty, who was no match alas 11 ! at any time for the dignity of her ancient line Ser
1983.econd marriages. And, to it to tell the truth, the women is are still more opposed fa
1984.cially on the part of a widow. To their honor be in the it spoken, there are, perhaps
1985.re virtuous, devoted widows amongst the world. Irish than any other people As for our
1986.idows amongst the world. Irish than any other people As for our friend, Mrs. Reilly,
1987.tween us and forbid the If there be any one thing is for which to honor our valued
1988. there be any one thing is for which to honor our valued friend, it her devotion 240
1989.LAKES AND FLANAGANS. of her husband. is memory Hers 1" is the widowhood of filling the
1990. Tim Flanagan was just corning out with one of his dry jokes (though in his heart h
1991.ment seemed to be regarded as a sort of duty growing out of ; the occasion. The sapp
1992.ngue of midnight had toll'd twelve." No one was exempted from the common law, whic^
1993.e." No one was exempted from the common law, whic^i was cheerfully acknowledged as
1994.ake in splendid style, remarking at the same timo that it was a great pity the minue
1995.n danced a very bride. (< 24] was over, good jig with the fair you what, Edward," sa
1996.his wife acknowledged the compliThe old man's ment, and both returned it with inter
1997.sets, children, and let me rest awhile. God your kind hearts." in the evening the g
1998.d your kind hearts." in the evening the good old gentleman had asked Blake to dance
1999.ld refuse to humor an old friend of her family when he was exerting himself " to keep
2000. the fun !" Alas for the discernment of good Mr. Williams iio had been trained up no
2001. and it was painfully manifest to every one 2002.d him the best of husbands. blessing of God be with you both, now and for ever." He
2003.he last old (except that of Eliza), the time ; look at parting. As for Tom Reilly, t
2004.e oasis in the desert of his monotonous life. Like " the hallowed form " of which Mo
2005.is monotonous life. Like " the hallowed form " of which Moore sweetly sings, so was
2006.hat happy day imprinted on Tom Reilly's mind fancy's brightest tints, and for years
2007. " lingering haunt the greenest spot On memory's waste." must turn Edward Flanagan's w
2008.into a common-place Benedict very sober one, I confess, but of still — not a a pr
2009. the Union. Now, that Jane was secured, love gave place to ambition, a craving desir
2010. love gave place to ambition, a craving desire for popularity. ; and, as the surest la
2011.referment, Blake began to was gifted by nature with a handsome person education and so
2012.gifted by nature with a handsome person education and society had given him a good addres
2013.n education and society had given him a good address, and these were two great feel
2014. and he with the determination to win a death- name and mount to preferment in on the
2015. and he was soon acknow often ledged as one of its leaders. for He had a ready flow
2016. favorite. Repeal meetings were at that time " all the go," and Blake, as the son of
2017.Blake, as the son of an Irishman, had a good opportunity to rail against British tyr
2018.ood opportunity to rail against British tyranny, &c. stores), Washington Hall ('now Ste
2019.n Hall ('now Stewart's was the scene of many an tion, and there it was that our "
2020.at's going on amongst the Repealers. It will be in favor of a capital move for us to
2021.Repeal, with our Irish citizens. if you will, but a great deal There was a sneer on
2022.u If know that they are, their votes at man, Repealers you can secure specified, an
2023.ers you can secure specified, any given time to be hereafter think will by attending
2024.d, any given time to be hereafter think will by attending a few Repeal meetings, and
2025.meetings and make speeches there 01 the same principle that you became a freemason f
2026.ngs and make speeches there 01 the same principle that you became a freemason for the —
2027.y question ?" — ' to yet made up your mind go or not to go that is the " I go/' sa
2028.the drama A POLITICAL SPEECH. 245 "Now, mind," said Henry, " 1 will first make a spe
2029.PEECH. 245 "Now, mind," said Henry, " 1 will first make a speech and do my best to w
2030.est to win the ear of the court, then I will gracefully introduce you as an American
2031.you is well-disposed towards Ireland. I will then leave in possession of the stage,
2032.stage, and the audience, thus prepared, will be all your own shapes his clay/" you c
2033. senti- ments on the Repeal question he will himself explain." The announcement was
2034.began by saying that — he had not the honor of being born in Ireland, but he was pr
2035.saying that — he had not the honor of being born in Ireland, but he was proud to sa
2036. sounds his infant had articulated. was one His his love of Ireland had grown with
2037.infant had articulated. was one His his love of Ireland had grown with it his growth
2038.gth- ened with his strength, until very being. had become a part of To love Ireland,
2039.til very being. had become a part of To love Ireland, and to hate the tyrannical pow
2040.d cheers.) He had come there a two-fold duty. — — 246 B LAKES AND FLANAGANS. lif
2041.uty. — — 246 B LAKES AND FLANAGANS. life, if that evening to offer his fortune,
2042.une, and his in necessary, the glorious cause to which they were all devoted. would n
2043.. would not further occupy the valuable time of the meetiug, but in conclusion begge
2044.illiant speech, of expressive of manner good will towards Ireland, a nation otherwis
2045.nt speech, of expressive of manner good will towards Ireland, a nation otherwise des
2046.nd. (Loud and prolonged applause.) What man, with even half a soul, could turn over
2047.d applause.) What man, with even half a soul, could turn over the eventful page of I
2048.urn over the eventful page of Ireland's history, without feeling for her unmerited suff
2049. for her unmerited sufferings ? He, for one, would cheerfuly gird on his sword at a
2050.hen the down-trodden peoples of the Old World would simultaneously shake off the Incu
2051.rnments, and stand forth in ren- ovated beauty, the successful imitators of Young Amer
2052.o perfection ?" in- quired Blake. "To " life," cried Zachary — "and —do 1 not I
2053.t I am sadly afraid that Jane and Eliza will have given us up for lost. You know the
2054.s that Zachary could not help laughing. Good humor thus restored, our two " friends
2055.eloved Ireland ; but it is certain that many of the leaders were just such as they a
2056.R XV THE SCHOOL QUESTION TURNS UP AGAIN JUSTICE. — RETRIBUTIV* T. Blake was About hea
2057.* T. Blake was About heart of vital the same time that Mr. Henry giving his attentio
2058.Blake was About heart of vital the same time that Mr. Henry giving his attention to
2059.ep Catholic children, at any cost, from being exposed to their pestiferous influence.
2060.nfluence. the young Church of New York. God had a few years before under the guidan
2061., whose indomitable energy and singular prudence gave weight and effect to his other rar
2062. prudence gave weight and effect to his other rare qualities. To his penetrating his
2063.e bent all the energies of his vigorous mind to save the Catholics of the United Sta
2064. States, and of fearful New York 11* in particular, feet, from the abyss opened beneath th
2065.ar 1841," says the hi» kindness of the State. torian 3f Catholicity in in New York,
2066.ation of the called. , School Question/ time, as . was Previous to that the public i
2067.- and distributed, according to its own good plea- sure, the funds provided by the c
2068.provided by the city for the purpose of education. The books used in these schools abound
2069.eotyped falsehoods against the Catholic religion, and the most vexatious and open system
2070.ally, so great, that no alternative The evil became, was left for Catholic parents,
2071.m attend- ing the Schools at all, or to cause an entire change to be made call in the
2072.e Schools at all, or to cause an entire change to be made call in the system. Under of
2073.on as School system. ever, that the . . Experience has since shown, howas new system, thou
2074.e circumstances, religious instruction, one, which, as excludiDg all fatal most to
2075.t instruction." * where sound religious knowledge the same time with secular Yet, even th
2076." * where sound religious knowledge the same time with secular Yet, even this *s it
2077.here sound religious knowledge the same time with secular Yet, even this *s it still
2078. the tfK«w • Right Rev. Dr. Barley's History of the CathoUc Church, on the fda*d Yor
2079.poraand exclusively anti-Catholic. When one of its members died and weut " to his a
2080.f of it, this corporation, and an sadly evil job they made as the testify. Many and
2081.adly evil job they made as the testify. Many and many a Hugh Church could Dillon was
2082. job they made as the testify. Many and many a Hugh Church could Dillon was turned o
2083.eir Henry T. Blakes mounted to fame and honor on the ruins of those religious princi
2084.g carried on between the Bishop, on the one hand, and leagued with fact that infide
2085.the dogged spirit of fanaticism, on the other, it is a well-known some who these stil
2086.ad received a great part of his Amongst education in those very schools, and he thought t
2087.. He was opposed to ieparate schools on principle, because the effect of such education w
2088.n principle, because the effect of such education was to contract the mind within the nar
2089.t of such education was to contract the mind within the narrow limits of an antiquat
2090.question, a question which involved the being and prosperity of the great Republic. f
2091.sperity of the great Republic. felt for one, deeply grateful to that venerable body
2092.ir School unparalleled exertions in the cause of education, and he rejoiced to have t
2093. unparalleled exertions in the cause of education, and he rejoiced to have that opportuni
2094.e Ward School. (A Ward School, Mr Blake good Catholics, voice !") : "You're a credit
2095. credit He could, therefore, prove from experience that boys might grow up Catholics, and
2096.o retire, and leave the ! field to some other common-schoolman. Tim Flanagan dropt in
2097.l rejoicing in the genial presence of a man with " I heart. " her 11 Where is Eliza
2098.. " her 11 Where is Eliza from you this many a day." ! ?" said Tim ; havVt seen Oh s
2099.ry's," replied " She spends most of her time there." Mrs. Blake. "Humph ! I suppose
2100. wish to goodness he'd come out like a -man, and declare himself a Protestant." 11
2101.oo far —he objects to every system of education that leaves out religion all — suppos
2102.ery system of education that leaves out religion all — suppose !" he'll be for getting
2103.schools over, and commanding the people other to send their children to no "And word
2104.k you, Miles Blake, on the of an honest man, are you as much in favor of the ? Comm
2105.tholic as any of Harry would grow up as good a my boys, though he was educated by !
2106.ow shirking the question — do — and mind, there's no Blake he is as ! good a Cat
2107. and mind, there's no Blake he is as ! good a Catholic as you think Mr. Henry T. Ed
2108.he has never apostatized is " Do you as good a son as Edward Flana- gan or John proc
2109.ing that question," " you know how that matter stands at weM. as we do n \ THE SCHOOL
2110.o/' said Tim, " and what's worse, every one knows ft, so I needn't say a word about
2111. know children are as very well, on the other hand, that my good children that my hap
2112.s very well, on the other hand, that my good children that my happen children are su
2113.ildren that my happen children are such good Catholics, and such as ever broke bread
2114.olic burying-ground. There must be some cause for all this. And you know very well th
2115.ight laugh you to scorn. Deny it as you will, you have made an infidel of your son a
2116. indeed, I'd ! rather If be a ttnant-at-will over on Ward's Island a son of mine had
2117.like of last night, and denounced I hia good Bishop not." simply doing his duty, fa.
2118. hia good Bishop not." simply doing his duty, fa.ce could never I could look any one
2119.uty, fa.ce could never I could look any one in the after it. God knows Miles looked
2120.r I could look any one in the after it. God knows Miles looked as though he would f
2121.dom. " You're a hard-hearted, unfeeling man, Tim Flanagan — that's what you are,
2122.tell me such a my very face." "As to my being hard-hearted," observed Tim, ''that's a
2123.ht against least to me before — at my knowledge, and I don't value it much from know I
2124. to leave your children in the hands of God, and put them under the protection of t
2125. added, by way of soliloquy. Virgin — one thing, now ing ! —what's it the reaso
2126.me to our house oftener than you do — many a pleasant even- his wife, and Mr. come
2127.ng. you're sitting here looking at each other, and fretting about what can't be cured
2128.short pause, and go to you oftener u we will begin — God knows w« 1 THE SCHOOL QU
2129.d go to you oftener u we will begin — God knows w« 1 THE SCHOOL QUESTION. want a
2130.; All right," said Tim, aloud " but own mind he enjoyed the sly joke which he did no
2131.Papist. Why not come out at once like a man, and say you don't care a d —n for pr
2132.d with the ruffianlj familiarity of the other, but he knew it was hardly safe to rese
2133.ve got did busy yourself too much about religion. I rather liked Harry Blake, and all ov
2134.er ?" obliged to you, Dillon. !" had no idea you had so good a memory You ?" hadn't
2135. you, Dillon. !" had no idea you had so good a memory You ?" hadn't eh ? well, I wel
2136.illon. !" had no idea you had so good a memory You ?" hadn't eh ? well, I well as most
2137.r — that's Sam's a brick, and nothing Many I a jolly good pieee of fun we've had t
2138.m's a brick, and nothing Many I a jolly good pieee of fun we've had together. But gu
2139.er-burdened with fault with t 259 3 ou, memory Harry Blake, 1 Still, I don't want to f
2140. don't want to fird for you're making a man, real bold stand agaiust the priests. f
2141.ld stand agaiust the priests. free-born citizen, and Go it like a like a you may count
2142.ingly, turn your back on what they call religion never say you are — — — ; ; — a
2143. while you go against their Bishop Be a man, Harry you're within a step of it !—
2144.r !" and he slapped him on the shoulder will with a force that made Henry quiver. "T
2145.ank you thank you, Dillon! what you say good-night." " Good night, old feller, good
2146.ou, Dillon! what you say good-night." " Good night, old feller, good night ! — ! I
2147. good-night." " Good night, old feller, good night ! — ! I consider of your pounde
2148.hem at any cost !" We my " Sustain them life ! yes, !" I guess we must ! I'd lose fo
2149.liza put amuse him. Music had no charms mind, and do what he would he could not spir
2150.a share of attention, which, to say the truth, quite willing to give. " Henry was Why
2151.t ! what on earth ails you ?" " Nothing particular, Jane," smile. said Henry, with a force
2152.ll Very well, indeed, Eliza. To you the truth, my dear girls, it was that fellow, Dil
2153.nalty so I often heard father say. They will not serve you at the polls unless you c
2154.parting words. Not that he attached any particular signification to them, or that they exc
2155.at they excited any new it ideas in his mind, but they seemed to haunt him, as his e
2156.e must now pass over some weeks, at the same time craving the reader's pardon if the
2157.t now pass over some weeks, at the same time craving the reader's pardon if the scen
2158.lass of men in every city who cannot or will not rest satisfied with the ordinary am
2159.eaping every barrie* might oppose their progress, whether it be law f 262 decency, or BL
2160.ht oppose their progress, whether it be law f 262 decency, or BLARES AND FLANAGANS.
2161.try are in Ne* It so happened that this particular New Year's Eve, t considerable numit be
2162.n masse to into their heads to " have a good time," which laudable project they exec
2163.se to into their heads to " have a good time," which laudable project they executed
2164.ir owners kicked out of the way. little One poor old Irishwoman had her covered sta
2165.tors, ! ! — THE they call "b'H0Y8" ON many it's A SPREE. 263 American freedom, at
2166.om, at home. I'd be I'd rather have the slavery sellirr we had apples that a day an' ye
2167. the Sure enough, ! run so long at all, God has great patience to let him But God p
2168., God has great patience to let him But God pity me ! what am I to do now, our old
2169.on that night, and the Ger- mans had no mind to admit such visitors into their socia
2170.th a shower missile of stones and every other that Shouting the most fearful imprecat
2171.s face, they saw at a the unhappy young man was glance that life was gone " Is he d
2172.a the unhappy young man was glance that life was gone " Is he dead?" asked one from
2173.that life was gone " Is he dead?" asked one from shot through the head. him over, f
2174.es she hang up ; ?" woman lives !" said one young " come, it was Watty Sullivan fel
2175.home !" know where the old ; " Oh 1 for God's sake, don't It !" cried an agitated v
2176. mother that he treated so badly iu his life-time. It would be the death of her else
2177.er that he treated so badly iu his life-time. It would be the death of her else, —
2178.badly iu his life-time. It would be the death of her else, — it would, indeed. !" N
2179.eed. !" No, no, bring him somewhere and God bless you " Go to to the d if 1 1 you o
2180.erely altered the name. recollection of many of my f«ai«r& RETRIBUTIVE JUSTICE. e*
2181.ion of many of my f«ai«r& RETRIBUTIVE JUSTICE. e*n bring him to 90* I'll my it little
2182.t little place down the alley here. get one or two of the neighbor-women to stay wi
2183.especially as he didn't die a Christian death, but the do I" it for God's sake. Come
2184.a Christian death, but the do I" it for God's sake. Come on, lli show you way fcfcf
2185.e any of thetn to go with her. " If the man was care a good Christian, out, they'd
2186.to go with her. " If the man was care a good Christian, out, they'd be willing to wa
2187.But Molly represented that let the poor soul be as it might, was still an act of Chr
2188.Molly went on to speak of the " for the honor of poor widowed mother, their hearts we
2189.mother, their hearts were softened, and God, and for the sake of the poor sorrowful
2190.ways a four of them volunteered dacent, God-fearing "When they all woman." five wen
2191.t prayer for the faithful the miserable soul whose earthly comfor, panion lay it sti
2192. be done was to cheer up the women with good cup of tea, which Molly did without los
2193.of tea, which Molly did without loss of time. Then the water was "put on" to wash th
2194.he dead body, carefully covered up. her opinion, that they should go to One gave it as
2195.up. her opinion, that they should go to One gave it as work at once and wash the bo
2196. cool the corpse." "To neither tell the truth," said the last speaker, "I ha*** heart
2197. uulucky vagabond of the church." h his life, same job. He was an and died without t
2198.ky vagabond of the church." h his life, same job. He was an and died without the rit
2199.y demanded her " Didn't he just die the death that he V and that everybody knew he wo
2200. an' worse than all, didn't he deny bis religion, and — blaspheme faugh God ? — didn
2201.y bis religion, and — blaspheme faugh God ? — didn't he speak with disrespect o
2202.h disrespect of the Blessed Mother of ! God whenever it, he had the chance ! I'd as
2203.Mother of ! God whenever it, he had the chance ! I'd as ; soon wash a dead dog But, no
2204.! I'd as ; soon wash a dead dog But, no matter for that St we'll do for the love of it
2205. no matter for that St we'll do for the love of it Ood, *et it be aa may 1 Somebody
2206.y pale, and the only sympton of unusual emotion was a sort of asthmaIt breathing, or ra
2207.bear this heavy blow afflicted ; like a good Christian, as she always was. The mothe
2208.s strong see expected to be Bon li this world. She wanted him ? ; see her —her son
2209.ay ; but, och Mrs. Dillon, dear for the love of don't be frightened !" don't look so
2210.of don't be frightened !" don't look so God, don't With a trembling hand, Mrs. Dill
2211.nce, she was heard to whisper, " He was good once, an' sure we all loved him. too
2212.re we all loved him. too —didn't you, God knows we did and he loved us, Hugh didn
2213.; — I och won't you speak to me, just one word I'll only say ! you're not dead, a
2214.rd I'll only say ! you're not dead, an' will, run for the priest myself Hugh, dear !
2215.elf Hugh, dear ! an' you'll ! make your peace with God ! ! ! Oh Hugh Hugh speak God w
2216.ear ! an' you'll ! make your peace with God ! ! ! Oh Hugh Hugh speak God will have
2217.peace with God ! ! ! Oh Hugh Hugh speak God will have mercy on your poor soul not a
2218.e with God ! ! ! Oh Hugh Hugh speak God will have mercy on your poor soul not a word
2219. speak God will have mercy on your poor soul not a word Oh Blessed Mother of God Vir
2220.or soul not a word Oh Blessed Mother of God Virgin Sweet is there no hope for my po
2221.en tell you, ray before y )u leave this world to me ; you can't be dead ! ! ; ! ! ! !
2222.shame for you, Mrs. Dillon, to the face God that way. A sensible woman like you oug
2223.d Polly, eagerly off." go for him right God bless in you an' do, then," said Molly.
2224.ink I added with sudden energy wouldn't mind I think I wouldn't oh, Lord oh, Loid ca
2225.n the stairway outside. cart," observed one of the women. it Dempsey with the But i
2226.if bless me !" ; said an' Molly we were will it forgettin' about the Coroner how lon
2227. did the unfortunate mother take of any one during all that dismal night. In vain d
2228.y pallor would overspread her face; the same shudder would shake her whole frame, an
2229.d into unusual by the dread presence of death, and such horrifying death. The policem
2230. presence of death, and such horrifying death. The policemen smoked, and chatted, and
2231.yes, with and desolation. They began at one time to discuss certain notorious passa
2232. with and desolation. They began at one time to discuss certain notorious passages i
2233.scuss certain notorious passages in the life of the dejeased, which had brought him
2234.hastily interposed, and begged them for God's sake to ipare the poor heart-broken m
2235. — 272 *' BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. ! For God's sake — that was something new ; —
2236. it guessed they never did anything for God's sake before however, they wouldn't wi
2237.entures were his jury. dropped for that time. Next morning brought the coroner and i
2238.nformed that " deceased had come to bis death in consequence of a gun-shot fired by s
2239.f what had happened, but Hannah cut the matter short with a declaration that it was al
2240.e right enough a priest could do him no good now, and besides, I'm sure Father Power
2241.the benefit of the clergy ! Oh ! my on# God my God I thought poor John's death was
2242.efit of the clergy ! Oh ! my on# God my God I thought poor John's death was a heavy
2243.my on# God my God I thought poor John's death was a heavy crush, but what if was it t
2244.decent, respectable to invite people to man 11 Tim Flanagan 1 Hugh Dillon's funeral
2245.ent Hannah, he did but your unfortunate life from what his father did an' ! — och
2246.an' ! — och " ! ! he died a different death — — his funeral doesn't make much m
2247.h — — his funeral doesn't make much matter one way Well ! or the other." leave it
2248. his funeral doesn't make much matter one way Well ! or the other." leave it to m
2249. make much matter one way Well ! or the other." leave it to me ; then," interrupted W
2250.t he never cared a red cent for in .his life- time ?" Hannah asseuted, with a fresh
2251.ever cared a red cent for in .his life- time ?" Hannah asseuted, with a fresh burst
2252. burst of clamo- rous weeping. All this time Molly Reynolds and two of 12* 1874 BLAK
2253.eemed to them useful or necessary. That same afternoon, about four remains of ter's
2254.n an omnibus. recognized Mrs. Dillon as one of the mourners, and an icy chill ran t
2255.ve as chief mourner He !" looked at the other assistants as they passed, or rather as
2256. passed, but Hugh was not there. " Uood God soon ?" he said to himself, " can he be
2257.eary presentiment which had haunted his mind all that night. He hastily stopped the
2258. he had expected. All that day, and for many days after, Henry Blake was an altered
2259. days after, Henry Blake was an altered man. Conscience kept whispering her reproac
2260.he could stifle noise and bustle of the world — But the the duties of his profes* l
2261.d was forgotten, at least by Henry. His mind was occupied by given us to salvation.
2262.asing cares. Just three weeks after the death of joy of the families on both in Hugh
2263.ured to throw out a suggestion that Was time to have the boy baptized. that his moth
2264.much fatigue "Why, dear Jane," observed will as yet." her mother-in-law, "it child b
2265.," observed will as yet." her mother-in-law, "it child bap- be no fatigue io you ;
2266.tigue io you ; we can have the tized in one of the parlors below, so that you'll ne
2267. Mrs. Blake looked at her son, who took good care that ghe should not meet his eye.
2268.say : His mother was completely at a in-law, what she had an instinctive fear of gi
2269.account how can you be answerable to il God and the Church to let your child be bo
2270.ch to let your child be bo long without being baptized ?" Oh ! as to that," interpose
2271.call the blame on me. us to The priests will hardly either of account about the bapt
2272.n the Baptist faith, and am still quite opinion that it is much till better, and more c
2273. about what were to be brought up still religion the children in." so, " I am really sur
2274.ou talk ma'am," replied the daughter-in-law, with increasing emphasis. " I'm sure o
2275.asis. " I'm sure of " Henry changing my religion. Did I never told that I had any though
2276.ell ! I understood you to say, Jane, on one occa- sion, just a week or two before o
2277.ek or two before our marriage, that you religion, it had no particular objectiou to the
2278. marriage, that you religion, it had no particular objectiou to the Catholic if and to you
2279.and to you recollect, I observed at the same time that if would be very convenient y
2280.o you recollect, I observed at the same time that if would be very convenient you co
2281. very convenient you could make up your mind a joke come to " my ! church." all Oh t
2282.tion, or else 1 should have settled the matter at once." " Well ! but seriously, Jane,
2283.d away from his mother, who looked from one to the other with an anxious, troubled
2284. his mother, who looked from one to the other with an anxious, troubled look Whatever
2285.of that there was every appearance of " life and health about him. And so, Henry," s
2286. " Well child's I BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. mind, will if anything happens before then,
2287.l child's I BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. mind, will if anything happens before then, your b
2288. yourself — you had better look to in time. matter. Remember, the loss of a soul i
2289.elf — you had better look to in time. matter. Remember, the loss of a soul is no tri
2290.n time. matter. Remember, the loss of a soul is no trifling what's come over you at
2291.th I" ; my dear Jane at such a perilous time ! " Discussion just tell why, there's n
2292.iscussion her that you're answerable to God for your off. child's soul, and that yo
2293.answerable to God for your off. child's soul, and that you must have hold out after
2294.at mean then, little !" "Ah " there's ! God mend you difference both 1" said the mo
2295.ened attack of fever. The nurse, like a good Protestant, and a all skillful tender o
2296.she kept the head cool with rmegar, and other such applications. quite excited, in Mr
2297.ore till I am quite recovered. I had no idea that — EBENEZER. lhe could be sc anno
2298. be sc annoying. 2*79 about that baptsm life ; Such a fuss as she did make one would
2299.ptsm life ; Such a fuss as she did make one would think it was a matter of solemnly
2300.s she did make one would think it was a matter of solemnly I and death. I declare woul
2301.think it was a matter of solemnly I and death. I declare wouldn't ; be a Romanist for
2302. wouldn't ; be a Romanist for all the ! wealth of New York ! they are the child queere
2303.pending fever "and know to what earthly good can that do the child ? Don't talk me o
2304.ays Ebe — ne — Blake ! Henry may do will surprise me ! zer I" enunciating so as
2305.80 BLARES AND FLANAGANS. " Did ever any one hear of a it's a wonder it Blake with s
2306.athen — have nothing do with him take good care that — old Ebenezer take care of
2307. goodihis Tim about — he'll hear " it time enough ! !" all Oh never fear, Miles, I
2308.Mrs. Henry, who, having been brought up religion of dollars all and cents, had a pious v
2309.s sooner or later made great harm after DEATH OF THE CHILD. That very night, 28) when
2310.in preparation for came a loud knocking one in the house himself, he start. made ev
2311. himself, he start. made every The door being opened by Miles was confronted by Henry
2312.ened by Miles was confronted by Henry's man-servant, who was sent to beg Mrs. Blake
2313.heir feet could carry them, praying the time that the poor innocent child might not
2314. not die with- out baptism. In vain did good Mrs. Blake and her more phlegmatic husb
2315.ould hardly believe possible at another time did the incense of prayer in vain go up
2316.d Henry walked it window to conceal his emotion. Mrs. Blake saw at a glance that was to
2317.for Miles would have soothed her ; some time, she resisted all his efforts. " Let me
2318., I Miles ! ; let me cry it out. I have good reason child u Oh ! if I it had only ta
2319.lf sure " it any fault of yours, I'm No matter whose fault it is," observed Miles, " i
2320.uldn't be in I" your place, Henry, this good round sum " I think, father," said Henr
2321.y, sharply, " you might ihoose a fitter time than this for I didn't send for making
2322.making your strictures. you to ask your opinion of feel ?" ; my conduct. Jane, my love,
2323.inion of feel ?" ; my conduct. Jane, my love, how do you Jane could not answer she w
2324.weeping. Not that she had the slightest idea of his comforted. having sustained any
2325. heavy blow to Heury Blake and his wife time being. Mr. and Mrs. Pearson, too, were,
2326.y blow to Heury Blake and his wife time being. Mr. and Mrs. Pearson, too, were, at ve
2327. out of Miles," so he dropped as usual, one evening to Miles Blake's sitting-room,
2328. put the best face ; he of could on the matter and, as Tim could not think J jesting o
2329.ting them with Henry's want of effects, religion, and its lamentable he had been actuall
2330.ally condoling with them in the best of good ; faith. Poor, honest, kind-hearted Fla
2331.with unusual " After all, there are not many like him now- " I wish he'd only leave
2332." I wish he'd only leave off that nasty habit of thrustit is ing his hands in his poc
2333.so !" ! ; sure I meant no harm " Nor no good, either, Eliza I'll thank you to walk !
2334.avor girl, You have a face of brass, my good tell or you wouldn't ' talk to my face
2335. you and your brother were ouly half as good, or half as respectable as Tim Flanagan
2336.A'S LITTLE TRIALS, AND HOW SHB DELICATE NATURE SURMOUNTED THEM. — Miles Blake and hi
2337.st- keen self-reproach following on the death of Henry's born, without baptism, when,
2338.es Blake saw the day, and that not came many years before, posal with something even
2339.that she had any objection to the young man himself, or to his family far from it,
2340.ion to the young man himself, or to his family far from it, indeed but, to tell the re
2341.r from it, indeed but, to tell the real truth, she had got such a fright by the death
2342.truth, she had got such a fright by the death of Henry's child, and was so vexed at t
2343.o vexed at the goings-on she saw at the time, that she would sooner see Eliza laid i
2344.l His wife was — ; elicited the whole truth. 286 " Well BLAKES AND now !" FLANAGANS
2345.had me a terrible fright, I give you my honor." " How is that ?" said Miles. " Why, m
2346., either to myself, my prospects, or my family ; but when there is it is only on a poi
2347. when there is it is only on a point of religion that you hesitate, in getting over that
2348.o trouble well know me ing with Eliza's religion. tion such a thing. Pshaw ! ! it is abs
2349.ther and mother-inidle, childish fears, law that are to be, dismiss all these from
2350. are to be, dismiss all these from your mind, and give your consent cordially and ch
2351.ially and cheerfully. You know myself I love Eliza as well, aye, better than I do it
2352. has no objection — in- deed, she was good enough to say that she could never love
2353.good enough to say that she could never love any one else as she loves me. So you se
2354.gh to say that she could never love any one else as she loves me. So you see there'
2355. that she's as city. bitter against our religion as e'er a one in New York How " do we k
2356.. bitter against our religion as e'er a one in New York How " do we know but you'd
2357. do we know but you'd just turn out the same ?" really," said Zachary with the same
2358. same ?" really," said Zachary with the same merry " one would suppose, to hear you
2359.ly," said Zachary with the same merry " one would suppose, to hear you talk, that t
2360. to hear you talk, that the laugh, risk will Why, was all on one side. Don't you thi
2361.at the laugh, risk will Why, was all on one side. Don't you think ? my But religion
2362.l on one side. Don't you think ? my But religion be in danger as well as Eliza's See how
2363. granted that ; it's all settled — so good morning Not a word now never mind. I se
2364. so good morning Not a word now never mind. I see you're going to apologize. Bu; r
2365.reli- 1 forgive you, especially as your opposition I'd ever give was entered gion. (as we
2366.! at the bar) on the score of I Ha ! ha religion, indeed just as if myself or others any
2367.s if myself or others any trouble about religion. No ; fear of eh, me preventing a young
2368. No ; fear of eh, me preventing a young one from being baptized ! Mr. is it is Blak
2369.r of eh, me preventing a young one from being baptized ! Mr. is it is Blake no, nor c
2370.and Mrs. Blake from edging in a word of opposition to tional the match. They, on their par
2371. so successful were his tactics. By the time he stood up to go, he had talked the wo
2372.lked the worthy couple into a dreamy it state of half consciousness, a mesmeric slumb
2373.ey sat for some minutes looking at each other in silence, at their faces relaxed, fir
2374.just gone through'." 11 Well Miles," on one side, was answered by " well Mary," on
2375.e, was answered by " well Mary," on the other, and they both laughed again, " So we h
2376.After all, maybe he'll things res>( may good- torn out better than we expect. Zachar
2377. off-handed fellow, and I'm sure make h good 288 husband. BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. As f
2378.8 husband. BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. As for religion, we must only try and get Father Power
2379. I suppose we must only better than any one else. what will be, wiU leave the matte
2380.ust only better than any one else. what will be, wiU leave the matter in the hands o
2381.y one else. what will be, wiU leave the matter in the hands of God be!" Poor Mrs. Blak
2382.e, wiU leave the matter in the hands of God be!" Poor Mrs. Blake talked of leaving
2383.. Blake talked of leaving the result to God, when she was acting against her own re
2384.ter to walk deliberately into the gulf. God has little to do with marriages like th
2385.ul air ; ; — are contracted in direct opposition to the teaching of his Church, and how
2386.ey might treat her just as they " had a mind and she was determined to put an end to
2387.s determined to put an end to favor, it one way or the other. In short, she made ou
2388. put an end to favor, it one way or the other. In short, she made out such a case in
2389. against her parents, that Zachary, who desire in really loved her, felt a chivalrous
2390.t called his and Zachary went on way To justice, he had a sort of liking for the old co
2391.ple, and was desirous to spare them the pain of knowing what their daughter had said
2392.ice suitable Dr. to the approachall ing change in her condition. to say, then smiled "
2393.and shook my admonitions would have any good should be very willing to do what " I y
2394.it It is very strange — pardon me, my good lady — is very strange, indeed, that
2395.t in that I can do nothing for you this matter. If you permit your daughter to marry t
2396.loug remembered in the contingencies of life. all niamwd own rashness — shall I sa
2397., but they are just what conscience and duty both dictate. — Good morning — ! th
2398.t conscience and duty both dictate. — Good morning — ! there is a person waiting
2399.up a show of composure, and walked " It will be long out with an air of offended dig
2400.u he heard what had passed, and swore a good round oath that Eliza should marry Zach
2401. his finger for Father all Power or any one else. very satisfactory to the young fo
2402.ed in his came to assist her mother- in-law in preparing for the wedding. Miles, th
2403.first (in compli- of St. Peter's, Power being, of course, out of the question, and TH
2404.urning and rite preacher of the Thomson family. a shining light " was Tomkins in the c
2405.f John Wesley, and him did the Thomsons honor with an exceediug great honor. In his h
2406. Thomsons honor with an exceediug great honor. In his hands were it vested the spirit
2407.t vested the spiritual destinies of the family, and glad dened his inner man to get wi
2408.of the family, and glad dened his inner man to get within the circle of his influen
2409."Thank you, thank much obliged for your good wishes," and the carriage drove off. Mr
2410.went except Edward and Margaret. of the family Their going was agreed upon at a family
2411.family Their going was agreed upon at a family meeting held on the previous evening. N
2412.11 two young girls just approaching the chance of making acquaintances which girls," s
2413.s," said they could not sanction. Never mind, their father gaily off ; "you'll have
2414.Eh, Mr. O'Callaghan, what do you say V* honor, I thiuk you're quite in the right. Upo
2415.rs !" said Edward, laugh- " tell ?" the truth, now, do you not envy Margaret gentle T
2416.o you not envy Margaret gentle T and me will " Fie, Edward !" interposed girls ? his
2417.ys. You Catholics can't get through the world so smoothly as other folks." " Why, wha
2418.'t get through the world so smoothly as other folks." " Why, what had religion to do
2419.oothly as other folks." " Why, what had religion to do with Eliza's trials ?" demanded T
2420.e, along, were so forgetful of poor any one being forbidden to eat meat on fish tha
2421.long, were so forgetful of poor any one being forbidden to eat meat on fish that day,
2422.eat bread and butter and eggs — there many things on a hotel-table that a Catholic
2423. that a Catholic can make a meal of for one day, without breaking the commandments
2424.ot quite so obstinate as that knows her duty as a wife too well to disobey her husba
2425.ary !" exclaimed Eliza, pettishly " why will you talk such nonsense ?" 11 Never mind
2426.will you talk such nonsense ?" 11 Never mind, Eliza, Uncle Tim is no stranger, and I
2427.ng himself to that, Tim ; " after Eliza necessity. table, was more rational, and made a v
2428.y. table, was more rational, and made a virtue of Whenever there did happen to be fish
2429.enture on the fish. I told her it was a judgment on her," he added, laughing. " Well, ar
2430.nd flushed and her voice quivering with emotion. THORNS IX THE PATH. little 29* Zachafy
2431.hat If I had no intention of givk g you pain I really offended, I will say no more.
2432.of givk g you pain I really offended, I will say no more. you are thought it would ?
2433.e don't want my dear ! would give Eliza pain. Cheer up, there's no use in letting yo
2434.irits sink for trifles. tell I only the truth, I wonder you got back safe at all, for
2435.. Tomkins's blessing you for is just as good 1' as your Father Power's ?" "May God s
2436. good 1' as your Father Power's ?" "May God said Tim. forgive " I making such a com
2437.arison, wouldn't mention the two men in one breath. There's just as is much !" diff
2438.ying, Tim took bye, up his h*t stick. " Good Eliza ! good bye, after Mr. Thompson I'
2439.k bye, up his h*t stick. " Good Eliza ! good bye, after Mr. Thompson I'm glad to see
2440.king so w^ll your unlucky journey. Next time you go travelling, Eliza, I'd advise yo
2441.ou along, Nelly then you can act like a good, little obedient wife, and a nice ! Pro
2442.omething about your Uncle 11 that makes one like him, even when he says what ona No
2443.n he says what ona Now, coming from any one else, would have certainly resented tha
2444. that last observation of I but, for my life, I can't be angry with him. his There's
2445.him. his There's something so frank and good-natured about him, and he does not care
2446.is Catholicity till — I was Romanism, one sees I thought of your take ill recent
2447.xation — that cannot what he to Every one that he never means give offence." " We
2448. I shall begin to be ashamed of my fuss religion, if I hear people about it. He had Eliz
2449.e gaily than before " I begin to have I good hopes of you, my darling girl. was afra
2450.emphasis " she's not over-burdened with religion, I'm afraid, any more than Zachary. in
2451.ty, " long as I do if you had known the family as want of faith, in fact is all the ef
2452.but what they tants — are, as regards religion ?" Oh I had almost forgotten to ask," s
2453.right hand — I mean I their left-hand angel. presume, as well as Tomkins can enjoy
2454.presume, as well as Tomkins can enjoy a good dinner, most men, and, indeed, his paun
2455.are you have !" cried Tim, with perfect good humor. " But what about Arthur Brown EI
2456.ds mg daughters. Arthur Brown is a very good young man, ; and getting on very his we
2457.ters. Arthur Brown is a very good young man, ; and getting on very his well in busi
2458.o to own sort for a wife, when he wants one." INFLUENCE OF EARLY TRAINING "But bow
2459.o you know arch smile. " 299 that Ellie will be of the same opinion as you are ?" pe
2460. smile. " 299 that Ellie will be of the same opinion as you are ?" persisted Margare
2461.e. " 299 that Ellie will be of the same opinion as you are ?" persisted Margaret, with
2462.you are ?" persisted Margaret, with the same How all do I know, Maggie ? why, becaus
2463.nviction that he who " loves the danger will perish in fears that any of them Nor I
2464.nt." added Mrs. Flanagan quietly. " But will ever we're forgetting ourselves altoget
2465.r Susie is not well these times, and it will cheer her up some to see you all around
2466.have never much with such people as you will meet there," " and I must own I have li
2467.cousin, and I have, a great aversion to family-quarrels." So Edward was forced to go f
2468. that Henry and I should be of just the same notion. quite So, of course, we can't ;
2469. smiled, and said : " Oh ! of course no one could expect any such thing." There wer
2470.inisters at the table on that occasion. One was the Rev. Hooker Tomkins (who actual
2471.ace as thin, Tim had expected), and the other a tall, me^ncholy-looking man, who anno
2472.and the other a tall, me^ncholy-looking man, who announced the word These genguests
2473.ersation went on briskly during dinner, being chiefly of the light and cursory kind w
2474. the light and cursory kind which gives life and animation to the dull routine of du
2475.tine of duly installed in the places of honor. the dinner-table. Mr. Tomkins was quit
2476. sauce, the sight of which softened the good man's heart, yea, even to woman's tende
2477.e, the sight of which softened the good man's heart, yea, even to woman's tendernes
2478.ise " are you a Papist ?" " I have that honor !" said Edward. " Henry, will I you all
2479.ave that honor !" said Edward. " Henry, will I you allow me to send you some of 3an
2480.d that a person of your discernment and good sense would be capable of such puerile
2481.t a person of your discernment and good sense would be capable of such puerile folly
2482.ble of such puerile folly pardon me, my good young friend we need not wonder at the
2483. ask what the vulgar doing these things good do you expect to derive from dining on
2484.h THE DINNER PARTY. or fowl. 303 But, I will go a little further iu the way I of exp
2485.a close conversation with his mother-in-law, who sat next him but, it was quite evi
2486. ; as he shrank from giving unnecessary pain to any one Still, he had not provoked t
2487.ank from giving unnecessary pain to any one Still, he had not provoked the discussi
2488., and he could not in conscience, or in honor, decline giving his opinion when cient
2489.cience, or in honor, decline giving his opinion when cient asked. Tomkins looked around
2490.ted. " In that case," said he, with the same quiet smile, " in that case, Mr. Tomkin
2491.efer you to our catechism. You can have one any time by sending to my house." The l
2492. to our catechism. You can have one any time by sending to my house." The laugh was
2493.s he exclaimed The track you, I have no desire to read Romish books. of the beast is,
2494.of the beast is, more or less, in every one of them." " Ah, yes !" sighed the melan
2495. people now-a-days. They have power/ my good understand." sir, bad odor with many th
2496.my good understand." sir, bad odor with many them the words of which many love not,
2497. odor with many them the words of which many love not, and cannot in ' Tomkins affec
2498. with many them the words of which many love not, and cannot in ' Tomkins affected t
2499.ack. I should take if it as a favor, my good young gentleyou would just favor us wit
2500.would just favor us with your own views man, of this Rom — this i't Catholic prac
2501.h a Catholic knows no distinction as to time, or place, or company." unguarded triho
2502.ion better than I can. Doubtless he has good reasons to assign." Henry turned Ely gl
2503.not make it a Catho stomach, do as 11 I will." I" How it unfortunate said Edward, in
2504.em, to throw down the gauntlet at " the truth is, my stomach lost its Catholic tone o
2505.nd has never since recovered it. 11 The truth Indeed, I much fear it never it will. I
2506.e truth Indeed, I much fear it never it will. It is unfortunate, aa my cousin observ
2507.be remedied. ? Mrs. ladies Pearson, the pleasure of wine with you Come ! and gentlemen,
2508.have had too much of controversy let us change the subject." ; this tiresome " I quite
2509.wering your question," said Edward, " I will ask you to do me the favor of taking wi
2510.ould not warm " ; Ah yea ! it were well life to that wise rule, irrelevant matter ;
2511.well life to that wise rule, irrelevant matter ; The every-day of men adhered mau is f
2512.is full of even the saints of in view." God do " if not always keep the main object
2513.ey di 505 B 1. AKES AND FLANAGANS To be God. a saint, as not, they are not saints.
2514.atholics take it, is to put off the old man, with I all his concusir, piscence, and
2515.ons of saints are not precisely of that nature." " I repeat ttiore, in what I have alr
2516.what I have already remarked," said Mil same dreary, monotonous tone. " I have studi
2517.t saints, and I have nought in vain for one who had not the human alloy. Do we not
2518. remlant of the ancient Adam to mar the beauty of an otherthe wise faultless character
2519. himself, " to oppose this mere loss of time," some of the Real saints to motley gro
2520.e Real saints to motley group of proud, soul-destroying heresiarchs could such a How
2521.pass." to an unprofitable discussion. I will e'en After a while, when the gentlemen
2522.ink so," replied Silas, " I like to see man or woman acting up tc thoughtfully. ihe
2523.ikes." " but even so, I can respect * ; man that acts on principle. and yet I think
2524. so, I can respect * ; man that acts on principle. and yet I think Henry Blake. I feel it
2525.c does, for I don't like shirking let a man be either one thing or another Silas la
2526.don't like shirking let a man be either one thing or another Silas laughed. he, —
2527.r you praise a papist ?" " I praise any man when I find him deserve Joe, shortly. "
2528. quite Edward Flanagan, wondering how a man could be so intelligent, so polished, a
2529.t religiosity — as distinguished from religion. now called Edward sighis ed as he cont
2530. contemplated the spiritual waste of so nature, and fine a he said, within himself, "H
2531.nd fine a he said, within himself, "How many there are like poor Joe —enlightened
2532.ike poor Joe —enlightened in all save religion, good " 808 BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. and g
2533.oe —enlightened in all save religion, good " 808 BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. and generou
2534.yet wholly ignorant of what they owe to God how pitiable is such darkness !" — "
2535.rd to you making interest I warn you in time that " his pretty sisters ? If you are,
2536. Joe asked, rather earnestly Edward for one of Flanagan family," went if you could
2537.er earnestly Edward for one of Flanagan family," went if you could ever dream of weddi
2538.e on Henry, with a dubious smile, " his family — at least with his consent. How say
2539.armth I than he usually manifested, " I will give is serious answer, for the subject
2540.give is serious answer, for the subject one of serious import. sisters am quite sur
2541.nce me that you are 1 not wedded to any form or phase of Protestantism. consider you
2542.artial person." " Thank you," said Joe, good-humoredly ; "I accept the compliment. r
2543.d-humoredly ; "I accept the compliment. religion of I my own. yet, though my good Hang i
2544.t. religion of I my own. yet, though my good Hang it Calvinists. religions I'll ; mu
2545.religions I'll ; must confess I have no particular I have never joined any church as fathe
2546.out-and-out ! I don't see the use of so many and I want to see all of one religion,
2547.use of so many and I want to see all of one religion, all and I guess keep clear of
2548.of so many and I want to see all of one religion, all and I guess keep clear of them whi
2549. bound together pit. bonds of brotherly love Well, in I wish you could only hear eac
2550.the Swamp, Mr. Flanagan, or our — — good host here his eloquence in carrying on
2551.ANAGANS. Margaret, and Mr. O'Callaghan, will, my father and mother, I think, impress
2552.dded quickly, " do you go to confession idea of being commanded and Joe laughed at i
2553.ckly, " do you go to confession idea of being commanded and Joe laughed at into any t
2554.do. stand that, any how." " Well, never mind point," said confession Edward, gaily.
2555.Edward, gaily. " now that's not the But mind, I shall expect — you to-morrow eveni
2556.f you wish I I Henry, and bid your wife good-night, as must go now, know Margaret *
2557.really spent a very pleasant evening. " Good-night." When Edward got home, he found
2558.and he coughed slightly, as to hide his emotion. " How industrious we have grown ; all
2559.rced smile " that part of a ball-dress, time for a single " ; or what is word ?" "Th
2560.e lome wax-tapers. I get worse, Oh ! it will be so beautiful. going to say the Rosar
2561.one but, after a few years, some of you will come and join me in my new home then an
2562.o, it added, looking round in surprise. will make me cry, too, and that would not be
2563. cry, too, and that would not be right. One who is soon to behold God in heaven, an
2564.not be right. One who is soon to behold God in heaven, and to take her place for ev
2565.e not— knowing that I can do you more good there," and she pointed upwards, this s
2566.fter wiping away comes. to I " sorrow's time enough when little it hope we'll soon h
2567.a whis- per, he said to his wife, : who life, sat with her back to the It sofa " Don
2568.eves her when it she ! you down-hearted God's sake ! about I her. Don't, Nelly dear
2569.s on the beautiful picture of fraternal love. " Ah !" said he in a low voice, ; "you
2570.and happy, both of you, his voice, " my good " I say, friends, to see your children
2571. M How is that ?" said his father. 11 1 will tell you, sir, all about it, if Susie w
2572.l tell you, sir, all about it, if Susie will only pro- mise to laugh." Susan smiled,
2573.. He says his stomach " I ! couldn't do one ' day without said it." Humph !" Tim, i
2574. 1 wasn't near Eliza at table." All the family were much amused at honest Joe Smith's
2575.eived witk general satisfaction, " But, mind, you're not to have Ellie there," said
2576.or she wouldn't have anything to say to one of his sort." By this time Margaret and
2577.ing to say to one of his sort." By this time Margaret and Eliza had finished their w
2578. — you'll soon get strong again, with God's help." Susan shook her head, but said
2579. with a effort. vigorous " — bless mj soul, woman Come, come, Nelly, this will nev
2580. mj soul, woman Come, come, Nelly, this will never do it's time enough to cry when 1
2581.e, come, Nelly, this will never do it's time enough to cry when 1 we have reason thi
2582.d cursing and swearing It's best to the time like troopers. take the poor woman from
2583.ve her come and stay here for tha live. time she has to She wouldn't be any great sa
2584.ll be right glad to give her a shelter. God May." " bless you, She'll Nelly, and mo
2585. pride ; live." do, mother, with very " God bless you, my son, you have to any ofte
2586.ou have to any often gone there of your one. own accord unknown of your visits. Mrs
2587.ppy and so prosperous." And he said the same to Edward and Margaret on their way hom
2588.APTER XIX fat DOtBLE ORDINATION A HAPPY DEATH ABLE VISIT. — AN DNSEASON« It was a
2589.ehold, and from early morning the whole family was up and o'clock, stirring. Even Susa
2590. eight was supported down stairs to the family and if eating-roora, though, to say the
2591.and if eating-roora, though, to say the truth, she looked as the effort was almost be
2592.was almost beyond her strength. All the family were present, including Edward, Margare
2593.m, and followed closely by Ellie, every one had a word of congratulation, and a smi
2594. truly Mother Mary that I thankful to I God and to our Bweet am spared to see your
2595.d, and said she hoped to see her make a good breakfast, so as to strengthen her for
2596.till sitting at table when Dan Sheridan one. ' " So much the — shall see and his
2597.him," said " lecturing others, and, the world are you about here ?" " I thought you'd
2598.d your droll " lauu-hin«; at you." the time for was only telling u& them this morni
2599.ation of my I poor uncle, Father Flynn. God all be I" merciful to his soul That was
2600.er Flynn. God all be I" merciful to his soul That was a great sight tear. it, out an
2601.er well myself, Bht I couldn't miss the chance of T>less seeing ; Peter I and Thomas o
2602. ; Peter I and Thomas ordained. they'll God t'hem both hope be a credit to us all 1
2603.where he and Mike had been consulting a matter of some moment significantly. — on "
2604.ent significantly. — on " at least to one of us/' added Tom, for " I see your ear
2605.s getting pointing to a handsome French time* piece on the mantel-shelf. A ttp few m
2606.both glance towards them before the Two other young men received Holy ceremony began
2607.eived Holy ceremony began Orders at the same time. Tears were coursing each other do
2608. Holy ceremony began Orders at the same time. Tears were coursing each other down th
2609.the same time. Tears were coursing each other down the cheeks of the mothers and sist
2610.ung ecclesiastics, and even the sterner nature of Tim and Daniel was softened for the
2611.ear ones who were entering on so holy a state. wag the summit of earthly joy to the f
2612.e eyes have seen thy salvation." ! O in peace, were leaving the church, Susan lingere
2613.in sweet is communion with soon see ray God but it past now. I shall hi3 Him in the
2614.ir respective parents, the two families being THE DOUBLE ORDINATION 821 •gain prese
2615.the course of the afternoon she had the happiness of seeing Thomas, " who cheered her wit
2616.o," said it Peter, in present. " Thanlr God we have that is our power to do that mu
2617. I my yes, behalf when am called to the other world. Tim indeed good to me !" " How t
2618.yes, behalf when am called to the other world. Tim indeed good to me !" " How then en
2619.m called to the other world. Tim indeed good to me !" " How then entered the room, a
2620.entered the room, and his son said : Ah God happy we were yesterday morning to see
2621.ry to find that none of my Aunt Blake's family were there. 11 How " did that happen ?"
2622.ople ; and sent John to tell Henry. The same Henry is going on at a rate on the broa
2623. rate on the broad road. He has no more religion in him than that table." " I hope you a
2624.ee. I wish I had a better story to were God my own knows, I once loved Harry B'ake
2625.ke as if hf child ; but he won't let me love him now, 14* 822 do as 1 Sheridan tone
2626.1 Sheridan tone ; BLAKES AND FLANAGANS. will. ? But what do yon think ray soul !"
2627.GANS. will. ? But what do yon think ray soul !" —Bless it of Susan, Mr. he added,
2628.both of them priests I" —sure enougn, God seems like a dream Mr. Sheridan laughed
2629.our holy lives ! If we are ministers of God to-day, my dear sir, we owe it, under G
2630.d to-day, my dear sir, we owe it, under God, to the Christian foundation laid in ou
2631.undation laid in our early years by our good parents and the teachers they provided
2632.I might be disappointed after all. They will be very glad to see you both, for they
2633.'Callaghan's nephew, Lawrence Daly. May God bless — ! her and him, and they will
2634.y God bless — ! her and him, and they will be blessed, for they are both rood and
2635.they are both rood and pious !" A HAPPY DEATH to the 323 Tim had walked iiid window t
2636.m had walked iiid window to conceal nis emotion, Peter whispered his friend that he fea
2637.to bring the holy Viaticum uext And now good-bye, Susan," said he. " I do not bid yo
2638.couragement. child, You have fought the good pitied It is ; my for being called so s
2639.e fought the good pitied It is ; my for being called so soon to receive and are rathe
2640.ds, yours of after Hugh is Think of the death Dillon and others of your young acquain
2641.cquaintances, an enviable and you Susan will see that God indeed going to is good to
2642.an enviable and you Susan will see that God indeed going to is good to you. Your de
2643.an will see that God indeed going to is good to you. Your dear leave you, but you ma
2644. places iu the everlasting mansions And will you, Ellen, let your sister's early and
2645.ster's early and (I trust, it be) happy death of holiness, that !" encourage you to p
2646.e in way you may be re-united again the world of spirits So saying, he left the room,
2647.gnation Next morning Susan for the last time, received the Blessed Sacrament, in the
2648.D FLANAGANS. Her ; she passed from this world to the next. last momenta were of the m
2649.last momenta were of the most exquisite happiness one hand, and Sister her mother held Ma
2650.ta were of the most exquisite happiness one hand, and Sister her mother held Mary T
2651.ther held Mary Teresa crucifix fell the other, while Sister Magdalen held the around
2652., while Sister Magdalen held the around one, in fervent Lefore it. her glazing eyes
2653.s, so that her last glance upon All the family knelt prayer, and the prayers for the d
2654.ful sight to see the tranquil and happy death of that fair young girl surrounded by l
2655.yes, and fervent suppliants petitioning God in on her behalf. She was passin ing aw
2656.g away from earth The the freshness and beauty of her youth, and there transition. was
2657.nsition. was no horror, nothing painful will, the sufferings of long months, borne w
2658.o the divine had gradually detached the soul from the world, and exhausted the stren
2659.ad gradually detached the soul from the world, and exhausted the strength of the body
2660.e strength of the body, so that Susan's death was almost imperceptible. Some one made
2661.'s death was almost imperceptible. Some one made a slight motion, and Sister Magdal
2662.ight motion, and Sister Magdalen made a sign with her hand for all to be still. The
2663.id Why should we weep die in for such a death !" ? Blessed aie the dead who the Lord
2664. Henry, with emotiou. 11 " What a happy death was hers Yes, unutterably happy — but
2665. night, so I all, there is something in religion ; those nuns looked like angels on eith
2666.hole scene was unspeakably solemn and " God bless you, Harry ! beautiful." God bles
2667.nd " God bless you, Harry ! beautiful." God bless you !" said his years, uncle, add
2668.s, uncle, addressing him, for the first time in many by is the familiar name of his
2669., addressing him, for the first time in many by is the familiar name of his boyhood.
2670.iliar name of his boyhood. " If Susie's death of any benefit to your soul, in the way
2671.If Susie's death of any benefit to your soul, in the way of exciting whole- is some
2672.citing whole- is some reflection, I for one would be well content. That what we hav
2673.nt. That what we have all to go through one day or another, if and we forget it, so
2674.. Her only ; feeling for the moment was one was dead, and, like Rachel, "she would
2675.or- next Henry was a sadder and a wiser man, but, as merly on the occasion of used
2676.used to laugh at Hugh Dillon's dreadful death, r the impression gradually wore away,
2677.e called it, and ne would not thank any one having likened the nuns to who reminded
2678.eminded him of his angels. Henry had no idea of passing- for a devotee, and so the s
2679. so the salutary impression made on his mind by Susan's death, was speedily followed
2680. impression made on his mind by Susan's death, was speedily followed less of by a str
2681.est. About to a fortnight after Susan's death, Mrs. Blake went an early mass one Sund
2682.'s death, Mrs. Blake went an early mass one Sunday morning, and went to see her dau
2683.and went to see her daughter during the time of high mass. was, she wanted to find o
2684.he wanted to find out whether Eliza The truth still went to had reason to fear that s
2685.mson was gone mass at to church. " Very good, Mary, very good to ?" then, indeed, ;
2686.s at to church. " Very good, Mary, very good to ?" then, indeed, ; and what church i
2687.deal nearer than her own. v/ To you the truth, ma'am," added the warm" the mistress d
2688.o'clock mass this morning, thanks be to God, and when I came in it's what she scold
2689. AN UNSEASONABLE VISIT. the 827 Thomson family to dinner You should have slept an late
2690." for mass, I couldn't get out at "Even one day ?" I, say for what great harm would
2691.I said, for money in New me that was as good as a all the I think I heard him and he
2692. Catholic — indeed, she's not much of one now." Mrs. Blake affected to be quite i
2693.orry to offend you, but I only told you God's truth, so you needn't take it ill. Hu
2694.o offend you, but I only told you God's truth, so you needn't take it ill. Humph !" s
2695.y were brought feel so I up without any religion. be bound all Ignorant as am in other t
2696.eligion. be bound all Ignorant as am in other things, I know my religion better than
2697.norant as am in other things, I know my religion better than missis does, with her fine
2698.rself. was some vague connection in her mind between it an(i the ''fine larnin'" whi
2699." dear me ! who would ever think of you being bell. here so early. Zachary, do ring t
2700.dear Eliza to come with me. ! a capital time of it, I assure you, that old Tomkins i
2701.n't 329 you stay at home?" was the next one feels " Oh ! ma, that would never do !
2702. church on the Sabbath-day to wor* ship God. —he says he can Didn't you say " so,
2703. side. to Zachary Well ! as to that, my love," replied Zachary, with hia light-heart
2704.ed laugh, " I never do pray much at any time Eliza rewarded — that's a fact, but 1
2705.achary encouraged to proceed. " Now, my good and most-respected Eliza. mother-in-law
2706.ood and most-respected Eliza. mother-in-law, you see she is must not be too hard on
2707.r mother. Oh ! as to that, I cannot see one to go now and then However, to a Protes
2708.ch with shall try to go to mass fof the time to come —whenever I feel able." S30 B
2709.er was fain to appear satis- and so the matter rested for that time. Mrs. Blake found
2710.atis- and so the matter rested for that time. Mrs. Blake found out that it was time
2711. time. Mrs. Blake found out that it was time she was at home, and told Eliza she wou
2712.. open." We're always welcome there, no matter what company they have. Thank God, we h
2713.no matter what company they have. Thank God, we have one door "Why, " said ma, how
2714.t company they have. Thank God, we have one door "Why, " said ma, how to be sure yo
2715.ng brightstill ening her handsome face. Good came bye, Eliza, dear ; don't forget yo
2716.t five and go right off to church. Be a good girl, now, Eliza, and do what I tell yo
2717.you, and I'll get Father Power, or some other father, to give you a leather medal 1"
2718.ISIT. f 331 or your rare success in the art of mimicking. What would " fire, ma say
2719. would take take and, perhaps, explode. good care they the Irish too well don't eith
2720.oke them, and them, and the game " they will do anything, but once cross is up.' 7 Y
2721.m to forget that in / have some of that same Milesian blood my veins," observed Eliz
2722. your Irish blood, Eliza, has been long good American blood. You just retain enough
2723.ned into In the evening, when the whole family of the Pearsons and Thomsons, with Henr
2724.h Henry and Jane, were assembled in the same room, Zachary told, as a capital joke,
2725. her undertake such a journey at such a time it rich, Henry V Henry winced a little,
2726., else Henry Blake Why, ?" in regard to religion — what could I mean " And, pray, what
2727.a while like Paul Pry, asking ? : " Are good, regular folk here Do you in go to Chur
2728.rd present put, especially as knew that good Mrs. Pear- son was the very last person
2729.at would trouble herself about any such matter, and the consequence was that every one
2730.ter, and the consequence was that every one laughed heartily. disclaim any such int
2731.ir to let people look own ! spiritual " Good gracious, Zachary ! what an idea never
2732.tual " Good gracious, Zachary ! what an idea never see no, in no, Henry, you may be
2733. sure you ridiculous position I leave ! will me such a ! —turning grand inquisitor
2734.n blood to boast of !" " But apropos to religion, Henry," resumed Zachary, with a furtiv
2735.elf on the occasion of Susan Flanagan's death. They say you actually went it," to con
2736.to fry." said Henry, laughing, " I have other fish " Do you mean mean to say, then, t
2737.the for the last ten or twelve in whole family years. When was a boy, I used to go eve
2738.e queer work," observed Pearson, " that same confessing of one's never sins. I shoul
2739.rved Pearson, " that same confessing of one's never sins. I should I wasn't know ho
2740.ng with." " But you see, my dear sir, ; many Catholics who do not go to confession o
2741.go to confession of witness myself, and many my professional acquaintances." " True,
2742.ed, thoughtfully, " but I always had an idea tain times." — I don't know how tell
2743.l, you know little best. After all, the matter is of importance ; these old relics of
2744.s are the heaviest clog on our national progress they really are." " Why, pa !" said Jan
2745. and I are really sick of that tiresome religion "Bravo, Jane!" notion it !" — Zachary
2746.!" — Zachary, "you're just of my give religion to the dogs," say I, " I'll none of cri
2747. the dogs," say I, " I'll none of cried Religion, thus voted a bore, was kicked down sta
2748. stairs, and the conversation turned on other topics moment, as the company, one and
2749.on other topics moment, as the company, one and all, agreed. of greater xa Pearson'
2750.nd all, agreed. of greater xa Pearson's idea of conscience 335 CHAPTER XX. m. Pearso
2751.conscience 335 CHAPTER XX. m. Pearson's idea of conscience - -A RECONCILIATION —to
2752.preach at High Mass, and then there was one of the Pearsons made up a party "for Mo
2753.. Sunday came, and our party set out in god time for all to St. Peter's, so as to b
2754.nday came, and our party set out in god time for all to St. Peter's, so as to be in
2755., who sat next them. They were really a cause of dis'k traction to me," Ellie used to
2756.as to face the music. the party did the same, but Henry, as usual, took the matter v
2757.the same, but Henry, as usual, took the matter very coolly. Reclining with graceful ne
2758. when Edward Flanagan and his father-in-law came up. Margaret was not with them, as
2759.d Edward with a mule. R PEARSON " Mr. S IDEA OF CONSCIENCE. 3T» a Yes. and we were
2760.ur master —our master It ?" is in the science of salvation, and we Catholics are prou
2761.ow those duties ?" asked Edward, at the same time endeavoring to repress a smile. "
2762.ose duties ?" asked Edward, at the same time endeavoring to repress a smile. " What
2763. " It is conscience, to be sure —what other sir !" guide do require ?" hardly suffi
2764.amazement. " Do you mean is me, young ; man, that conscience beacon, as it not the
2765.ly and emphatically. in the first But " will place, you have the goodness to tell me
2766.by conscience ?" the voice of Why, How, God speaking within us, teaching us to do g
2767.d speaking within us, teaching us to do good and shun then, does ? it evil." " happe
2768. us to do good and shun then, does ? it evil." " happen that is it its dictates are
2769.t is it its dictates are not always the same — How that conscience forbids tb* 15
2770.cientious Mahometan is bound to keep as many wives as he can ; manage to support the
2771.ism is not necessary, while I, as a but one wife. Catholic, necessary. cies believe
2772., be, as you say, the unerring voice of God ?" The others all laughed, for Pearson
2773.tical at times, and this very point was one on which he often held forth, insisting
2774.re the only effective snrmons, and that man had if light enough within himself to i
2775.s A slippery jade " met your match this time !" that same conscience," observed Here
2776.jade " met your match this time !" that same conscience," observed Here in this very
2777.Here in this very city there are, to my knowledge, many eminent men, whose conscience tel
2778.s very city there are, to my knowledge, many eminent men, whose conscience tells tne
2779.— — " You may testily, laugh as you will, gentlemen," all said is Pearson, " but
2780.aid is Pearson, " but I say again, that religion founded on " jrou conscience. Conscienc
2781.ou conscience. Conscience is the divine law written on the table of the heart." Why
2782. oienoeia, according to yon, the divine law — the law and MB. the Pearson's idea
2783.ccording to yon, the divine law — the law and MB. the Pearson's idea of conscienc
2784.e law — the law and MB. the Pearson's idea of conscience 339 S:»me Gospel —and
2785.339 S:»me Gospel —and for the divine law is — conscience. other time I shall b
2786.d for the divine law is — conscience. other time I shall be happy to renew this int
2787.the divine law is — conscience. other time I shall be happy to renew this interest
2788.f mixed useful hints on conscience some education, ' could a tale unfold conscience. ' re
2789.' regarding the peculiar ladies bent of many a !" Good morning, and So he took the o
2790.g the peculiar ladies bent of many a !" Good morning, and So he took the old gentlem
2791. the ladies were all amused, and had no particular feeling except that of tion at Pearson'
2792.that of tion at Pearson's discomfiture. good-humored satisfac- " A queer sort of con
2793.young Flanagan, to be sure. to a fellow-man to ask His it conscience won't allow hi
2794.hink he depicted to the Virgin, and the other old Saints that Papists make so much to
2795.s on Sunday almost say, an unpardonable sin, to You couldn't get him to stay outsid
2796.ervice commenced, on any conceivable No matter how interesting And the subject on whic
2797.conscience would denounce that in is It same with the whole family of the Flanagans.
2798.ounce that in is It same with the whole family of the Flanagans. sort of people in the
2799.way, but so prere-ligion, so They are a good cise in their tious, if notions of exce
2800.if notions of exceedingly conscien- you will, that you cannot get one of them an inc
2801.conscien- you will, that you cannot get one of them an inch from the track." A Tim
2802.speak to us. Come room a minute." Never mind, father," said smile, " John and I will
2803.mind, father," said smile, " John and I will go is Ellie, with a mischievous It is i
2804.ILLYS SECRET. 34 tae room, in search of courage, but courage had forsaken him, and was
2805. 34 tae room, in search of courage, but courage had forsaken him, and was not to be so
2806.recovered. Tim aud Nelly looked at each other and smiled. her husband, as ?" Nelly no
2807. all Reilly told us of a certain little matter I right that would go on swimmingly, on
2808.t me here. As Tom has told you so much, will save me some trouble. Now what do you t
2809.and we never knew anything but what was good of them. 11 They belong to the real old
2810.e. " She seems well acquainted with the family-tree, and as for Alice herself," observ
2811. a nice, modest, sensible a'jd I'm sure will make a good wife. One thing greatly in
2812.est, sensible a'jd I'm sure will make a good wife. One thing greatly in her favor, s
2813.le a'jd I'm sure will make a good wife. One thing greatly in her favor, she was bro
2814.r to reason to put in a his heart is so good — so I just little want you hard or w
2815. or wickedness in him against any human being as well as I and if all fails you, you
2816.'ll not go beyond that. it the score of religion. You may girl tell him, too, that only
2817.hands, "as to that, I must only take my chance. I'm willing to try my luck with Alice.
2818.m the priest but you know yourself that one would do more than if any one else was
2819.self that one would do more than if any one else was preaching for a year to him."
2820. consent. I'm leaving that for the last chance." Mike ?" said Mrs. Flanagan. " Why, be
2821.and " I'd be sorry for that, for he's a good, kind father as any in New York bless G
2822.d, kind father as any in New York bless God you, Mike," said Mrs. Flanagan, " you w
2823.d you, Mike," said Mrs. Flanagan, " you will be the better were always a good son, a
2824. " you will be the better were always a good son, and your luck for it." Tim said no
2825.s no such notions in his head. If every one thought as little of it marriage as he
2826., — he's a very though I have nothing good lad in his own way." — "Bat he isn't
2827.her, and by right shouldn't there's not good enough well for him. many girls in New
2828.t there's not good enough well for him. many girls in New York city Nobody knows his
2829.knew earnestly. him. " Well, thank " It God for that ill same," said the widow, bec
2830.im. " Well, thank " It God for that ill same," said the widow, become him to be anyt
2831.come him to be anything not a else, for God knows he has no bad blood in him He had
2832. no bad blood in him He had as decent a man to his father as ever drop. would — s
2833.ieve." TOM RBfLLY'8 SECRET. 345 " Never mind him, Nelly dear !" said Mrs. Reilly, aa
2834.l be up to well to be offended at ; him one of these days, or going to vespers ?" a
2835.as she knew Tom his was gone around the other way. When Tim made appearance, " ready
2836.oad," as he said himself, he had on the same waggish smile, and Mrs. Reilly shook he
2837.ng air, but they walked off together as good friends as could be, John and Ellie bri
2838.tion, and I Now, Tom, I want to ask you one know you'll tell me the truth." " I wou
2839. to ask you one know you'll tell me the truth." " I wouldn't wish to tell " you anyth
2840. " and pnt the best for he could on the matter. Ae Alice, mother, can't say ;" if the
2841.d consented, I'd have had a daughter-in-law in on me before now. That's ray thanks
2842.the table, and appeared altogether like one who " Mother," said he, was making a de
2843.ver thought of giving you a daughter-in-law upon my word, I did — — not." " Wel
2844.ething of not. you the plain it, though truth, mother, as I'd just as soon you have y
2845.st as soon you have you had There was a time when I took a great notion of Alice Byr
2846.l pleased to have her for a daughter-in-law, but when I came to turn the matter ove
2847.ter-in-law, but when I came to turn the matter over in I my mind, I thought you'd just
2848. I came to turn the matter over in I my mind, I thought you'd just as soon be wise f
2849.ou'd just as soon be wise for marry any one, and that as we were so quiet and so ha
2850.t me to run the risk of disturbing that peace. let Let Alice be ever so good, and Ire
2851.ng that peace. let Let Alice be ever so good, and Irell, me like her ever sc I thoug
2852.o I made TOM reilly's secret. op 341 my mind that I'd try and get over my foolish no
2853.et over my foolish notions, I and, with God's help, I have succeeded. early and lat
2854. his mother, endeavoring to conceal her emotion. " Quite — quite and, sure, mother,"
2855.l I could for Mike well Sheridan, thank God, Alice herself ?" is now content to hav
2856. '* Tom, blushing faintly. It took some time for her to know Mike, but now she knows
2857.Tom ?" said she, a little " I believe I will, mother," said Tom, anxious to prove th
2858.turn to be and thoughtful. Tom spoke of many things, but he last, could only get hal
2859. the meal Was ended, and the tea-things being removed, the Bible Tom took op the Hist
2860.eing removed, the Bible Tom took op the History of • loud. which he had been reading
2861. wish to have no rival iu my affection. world to you, and mother." about " it, I'll t
2862.at you and Al : ce had a notion of each other." For God's sake, mother, don't think o
2863.l : ce had a notion of each other." For God's sake, mother, don't think of any such
2864.the long of neither Alice Byrne nor any one you, while else shall ever divide my he
2865.le else shall ever divide my heart with God spares you to me. this I'm quite as hap
2866.ares you to me. this I'm quite as happy world. it. now now as I ever wish to be in th
2867.brother never broke bread You put me in mind of him, Tom, very often, especially trh
2868.en light his mother look so happy. from one face was reflected on the other. his To
2869.ppy. from one face was reflected on the other. his Tom said nothing, however, but qui
2870.r easily. ei\V rrassment so cfirt I'.fi Many a time, in after years, as the happiest
2871.y. ei\V rrassment so cfirt I'.fi Many a time, in after years, as the happiest of his
2872. well it to he might, for the recording angel life. marJei in lustrous characters in
2873.it to he might, for the recording angel life. marJei in lustrous characters in the b
2874.altar of filial Tom had offered up on ; love the dearest after tions of his heart ;
2875.oung friends that Alice had a and, high opinion of Tom made Reilly, and could have been
2876.ired and it his down to the blessing of God, for self-denial. good mother h&yyj, an
2877.o the blessing of God, for self-denial. good mother h&yyj, and drew God loves, and p
2878.elf-denial. good mother h&yyj, and drew God loves, and promises ?*nd his wife rewar
2879. and promises ?*nd his wife reward That same evening, Tim Flanagan over, after tea,
2880. out for a walk. It was fine moon" But, mind you don't be long," said their light. t
2881.as he passed, as much !" as to say : my cause your hands." And Tim nodded peace the i
2882. : my cause your hands." And Tim nodded peace the in reply " I understand you — go
2883.tay at home. Ht didn't owe them any ill-will, but one of them should never come into
2884.e. Ht didn't owe them any ill-will, but one of them should never come into his fami
2885. one of them should never come into his family as long as he could prevent it. But Tim
2886.ble peofor her part, she didn't see and good Catholics, and, Mike could do better. "
2887.you can be brought round. Indeed I have good reason to know that he feels bad enough
2888.know that he feels bad enough about the same coolness. as for his daughter, ter girl
2889.l you what, Dan, even to say nothing of religion, which, you know, forbids us to keep sp
2890.ds us to keep spite " Why, And sure any one " then, Tim, don't I I know that well e
2891.spite against Neddy Byrne, or else, for God knows I'd be sorry to hear of harm happ
2892.n your saying you owe the Byrnes no ill-will. Now, it I see plainly that it's only s
2893.sh notion that's in your head, and with God's help we'll get it out of before long.
2894.ppose I can't hold out any longer. Dan, One against so many would never it's do. Bu
2895.old out any longer. Dan, One against so many would never it's do. But, upon it, my a
2896. girl, that I didn't come round without good pressing. I don't want him all to think
2897.ow, so very soft as to forget old times mind, and do what I tell you." Tim cheerfull
2898.n't consent. betters ? Isn't she wife ! good enough !"' your — eh, Mike sally answ
2899.r undutiful distance, not. Keep your my good fellow, 852 nnless BLARES AND FLANAGANS
2900. already, that I never obeyed a greater pleasure. Many thanks to you, command with my de
2901.that I never obeyed a greater pleasure. Many thanks to you, command with my dear fat
2902. father I and mother, and to you, in my good, kind friends. hope God you'll never ha
2903. to you, in my good, kind friends. hope God you'll never have cause to regret what
2904.ind friends. hope God you'll never have cause to regret what you have done for me thi
2905.ey jogged along side by To tell you the truth, I was up seeing Father Power this morn
2906.ake Neddy Byrne for tell him we must be good friends a the time to come. You know wh
2907. tell him we must be good friends a the time to come. You know what way Father Power
2908.I do this minute. If Neddy Byrne as the man take him for, he'll be of the same opin
2909.s the man take him for, he'll be of the same opinion." And Dan 11 such was really th
2910. man take him for, he'll be of the same opinion." And Dan 11 such was really the case B
2911.this, Dan," said he, " for, to tell the truth, I'm afraid I was more in fault than yo
2912.s more in fault than you were." " Never mind, Neddy, never mind," said Dan "which; w
2913.n you were." " Never mind, Neddy, never mind," said Dan "which; was iu fault, we're
2914.r too long. As for me, I can't take the same merit to myself that you can, for it wa
2915.and Father Power that brought me round. God bless them both Let us be good friends
2916.me round. God bless them both Let us be good friends for the Where's Mrs. Byrne ? sh
2917.the Where's Mrs. Byrne ? she used to be time to come. ever of us we've kept ! glad t
2918.ade such a show of cheerfulness that no one could ever suspect him of any lingering
2919.heridan's by a special stipulation. the many EFFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE 8 55 CHAPTER XXI.
2920.al stipulation. the many EFFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE 8 55 CHAPTER XXI. 1FFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE
2921. CAUSE 8 55 CHAPTER XXI. 1FFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE MATTERS OF GENERAL IMPORT. Passing over
2922.ssing over an interval of ten years, we will onc« DM*e their raise the curtain, and
2923.ections are the for nothing if Flanagan family, and we have written our readers, too,
2924.troduce Tim Flanagan at the head of his family, as we have done on former line of ;" h
2925.ce our characters, we miss his athletic form, and fresh, mirthful countenance are no
2926.features are shaded by a widow's cap. " Death has been here since last we met, This j
2927.adowy dart has struck down the There is life and soul of the family. a subdued expre
2928.t has struck down the There is life and soul of the family. a subdued expression on
2929. down the There is life and soul of the family. a subdued expression on every face, un
2930.iiu* ment records at once the exemplary life of the dead, and the filial affection o
2931.tnership immediately after his father's death, and the connection continued from year
2932.nection continued from year to year the same. The business of the house had become v
2933.d to prosper. John Flanagan had, in due time, followed his brother's fallen sister e
2934.avored suitor of on of whom we heard of many years ago Annie Sheridan. Teresa Daly w
2935.Sheridan. Teresa Daly was a daughter-in-law after Mrs. Flanagan's own heart, and yo
2936.looming story re-opens as her mother-in-law was when she first appeared before us.
2937.hen she first appeared before us. True, education made some difference, Teresa had been b
2938.nd she were like sister* EFFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE. 351 and Mrs Flanagan used to say she d
2939.d married a Mr. Fitz- young Irishman of good family, and still better principles, wh
2940.ried a Mr. Fitz- young Irishman of good family, and still better principles, who had e
2941.ars before. He was an intelligent young man, of steady, industrious habits, and was
2942. as yet in William street. Ellie had no family, and in her home her mother was spendin
2943.were marked as white spots in the daily life of the family so visited. But the noisy
2944.as white spots in the daily life of the family so visited. But the noisy for gambols o
2945.ncholy which had become habitual to her mind, as Bhe was always well pleased to retu
2946. read, and knit stockings for the whole family, especially the younger members, whose
2947.he took under her special charge. Every time the children of either family came to v
2948.arge. Every time the children of either family came to visit grandmamma, she had a new
2949.th families. On festival days the whole family assembled at some one of the houses, an
2950.days the whole family assembled at some one of the houses, and on the first day of
2951.rand mother's blessing. Mrs. Flanagan's life was wearing away calmly and peacefully,
2952., and if at times she did sigh for that world where her beloved husband awaited her c
2953.ly checked herself, and said : " Not my will, 358 BLAKES AND FLANAGANS ! Lord but th
2954., and to do thy holy and instructed the will." Thomas Flanagan was pastor where he h
2955.astor where he had for years edified of one of the city churches, faithful, by exam
2956.dan was not stationed quite so near his family. Out amougst the colony of faithful as
2957.. Out amougst the colony of faithful as life North River, he had a small parish unde
2958.ce or twice to see Mr. Sheridan, and on one of these occasions he spent a whole wee
2959.e events red " about the there." in the good last priest's life, and he used to spea
2960.t the there." in the good last priest's life, and he used to speak ever after of cer
2961.tain events as having occurfirst or the time Dr. Power was it Priest and all as he w
2962.nd all as he was, Peter esteemed a high honor to be visited by his former pastor, and
2963.iving, in but it would thin, be no easy matter to recognize care-worn old woman, the w
2964.ugh he stood somewhat better, he had as many wrinkles on his brow as though the silv
2965.e presenc* : dead father EFFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE. M Thy silver hairs I see, so still, sc
2966.onsequence in their estimation, and any one of the young Blakes or Thomsons, precoc
2967.deed, Mrs. Blake had received more than one gentle hint (before she choose to take
2968.t's too bad altogether for me your fine will, please God. to intrude on you and comp
2969.ltogether for me your fine will, please God. to intrude on you and company, too. bu
2970.t when you came into the parlor the how other day so unceremoniously, when the honora
2971.iza, don't trouble yourself, there's no necessity paying so much respect to old people li
2972.ys, that the children can learn nothing good from Eliza followed her mother to the d
2973.e," said the old woman, losing " go and mind your business, if patience altogether y
2974.together you have any, and let me go in peace. You first give the wound and then try
2975., of course I have nothing say. more to Good morning." Mrs. Blake called at Mrs. Fit
2976.aken her seat beside Mra IFFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE. Flanagan when a auditors for 361 burst
2977. ; Mary cry ! dear," said her sister-in-law, sooth- " don't crying sometimes eases
2978., sooth- " don't crying sometimes eases one's heart. "Oh! the old story, does no go
2979.ne's heart. "Oh! the old story, does no good, though it What's the matter now ?" Nel
2980.ory, does no good, though it What's the matter now ?" Nelly, neither more nor less. Th
2981.r more nor less. Those children of mine will indeed. It's will be the death of cry,
2982.hose children of mine will indeed. It's will be the death of cry, Nelly, me —they
2983.n of mine will indeed. It's will be the death of cry, Nelly, me —they no wonder I'd
2984.g in her house in after it and it'll be many a long day before I set foot to again.
2985. " of late years I haven't tell you the truth, when she was a g\rl growing up, I thou
2986. was a g\rl growing up, I thought her a good, obedient daughter.'' " Time has Ellie,
2987.ught her a good, obedient daughter.'' " Time has Ellie, much to answer for, ; Aunt M
2988.egards !" said speaVng in for the first time "it has wrought great changes \.ur fami
2989.time "it has wrought great changes \.ur family, and especially Henry and Eliza." " Oh,
2990. and especially Henry and Eliza." " Oh, time, 'Ldeed!" said Mrs. Blake, with a toss
2991.lake, with a toss of her head them. ; " time h.u If theli little to do with the chan
2992.time h.u If theli little to do with the change that's in father had taken your poor fa
2993.s ! advice— -may the Lord receive his soul this day and brought lib child*c*t up a
2994.cs all she hates soot. And so she's the time harping, harping at the chilcalls the t
2995.ping, harping at the chilcalls the true religion, so dren about Romanism, as she they'll
2996.t care. know some Still, you'll But the truth is, he hear him say, now and then, that
2997.eir father, and worse that, needless —God knows it and 1 know it, leaves me this
2998.. breaking down He's that's it far from being the man ! he used to be. And, sure no w
2999. down He's that's it far from being the man ! he used to be. And, sure no wonder
3000.nder that he stands a? as he does. Poor man find cross, at times, as a bear, and I
3001. struggling with who seemed some strong emotion. She looked at Ellie, and Ellie underst
3002. said she ; " I'm sure you wouldn't ask will be." ua, if you had remembere'd what da
3003.he anniversary of my is," dear father's death," said her aunt Ellie, with a faltering
3004.May Lord have mercy on your in silence, soul, brother to me all Tim Flanagan! it's y
3005.other to me all Tim Flanagan! it's your life!" The three wept some time it you was t
3006.n! it's your life!" The three wept some time it you was the loving and then go to ch
3007. Blake should morning with the Flanagan family, mass said by as there was to be a sole
3008.ly knew what it if was for. " As it's a family affair, him attend. At any rate, it's m
3009.y in order to leave word for Henry with one of the maid-servants who was a perhaps
3010.FLANAGAN Not now, Kitty ; 8 " I have no time for like visiting. Just ratch your oppo
3011.. Just ratch your opportunity, master a good pirl, and give your of my message." Aft
3012.o on. Why neither is Flanagan to say my good " uncle of more nor less than this, tha
3013.ss to-morrow for his father, Tim, pious memory." mother called this " Well, and then "
3014. you have got to pay the EFFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE. good account." like 365 penalty of tha
3015.ve got to pay the EFFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE. good account." like 365 penalty of that " Ir
3016.well of my our Irish It me safe through many a of hard-fought field, thanks to the "
3017. mean to " of a Not I, indeed I have no idea of going: to church week morning, and s
3018.ve you no compassion is on your uncle's soul perhaps suffering in you know the poor
3019.aps suffering in you know the poor dear man purgatory, waiting for the mass. How wo
3020.Lady you I'll may be sure, so The house will be crowded must go at once and secure t
3021." but,' she added, with a smile, " that will hardly prevent bet from going. It would
3022. " dear little fellow, so delighted the other evening when we took him King Lear. He
3023.ent of a young child that it quite does one good he was to see to see it. Oh, of co
3024.of a young child that it quite does one good he was to see to see it. Oh, of course
3025.r too, some- year or times." so, Samuel will be old enough to go, Evening came, and
3026.a was and be-curled at such a rate that one might suppose that she was to figure on
3027.ound, canvassing for admiration, and no matter how grave or important the subject unde
3028. about her that made her EFFECT FOLLOWS CAUSE. and graces put on by little 361 very c
3029.twithstanding the load of frippery airs art. On their way to the Park Theatre, Arab
3030. horrid old nun," said she, speaking of one "and you know, Ebenczer, nuns are alway
3031.he ; nun your ma -was reading about the other evening but only think, Ebby, the part
3032.e, Ebby," said his mother ihild " ; why will you talk bg, P mail often heard yoursel
3033.bg, P mail often heard yourself say the same, and " Why, — S68 it B LAKES AND FLAN
3034.n, for he was Kitty's prime favorite. 1 love Now, Master Sam ain't I a good girl, do
3035.orite. 1 love Now, Master Sam ain't I a good girl, don't you me ?" The answer was sl
3036.t out what he wanted to say. " Yes, you good time, but girl, — —you give me good
3037. what he wanted to say. " Yes, you good time, but girl, — —you give me goodies a
3038.you give me goodies all the " Sam not love you." And why so, Master Sam Irish, so.
3039. you Papist Sam must not I" —naughty, love bad naughty Papists." " But your father
3040. ren were disposed towards Catholicity. One ter." day, about this time, there came
3041. Catholicity. One ter." day, about this time, there came a decent looking " the emig
3042.ve two I'll tell but, I suppose, either will do. Mr. Edward." his Edward made appear
3043.made appearance accordingly. " Well, my good man, what " God save you, sir 11 can I
3044.appearance accordingly. " Well, my good man, what " God save you, sir 11 can I do f
3045.ccordingly. " Well, my good man, what " God save you, sir 11 can I do for you ?" 1"
3046. sir 11 can I do for you ?" 1" said the man, taking off his hat. 1 was directed her
3047.formation about a There was a sister of family of the Dillons. mine mar- John The year
3048.. mine mar- John The years ago. ried to one Dillon, last and they came out here man
3049.one Dillon, last and they came out here many we heard from them, they were doin' ver
3050.in' very well, an' they sent my mother, God rest her soul ! five pounds are in that
3051., an' they sent my mother, God rest her soul ! five pounds are in that very letter,
3052.nk," Edward. all Have you " Yes, sir, a family V and two children, strong in I have a
3053.I have a wife and healthy, thanks be to God. We're only two days it New York I'm ju
3054.'t get any account of poor Betsy or her family, an' fairly worn out. Is it true, sir,
3055. is, my my power my poor sister ?" poor man, quite true. to tell " I only wish was
3056.irst stunned by this intelligence ; The man was after a little, he ba4 coughed slig
3057.then spoke. bad news to begin with. But God's will be done And what about her husba
3058.poke. bad news to begin with. But God's will be done And what about her husband, sir
3059. did. They had a son, too, a fine young man, who died or rather, was killed, soon a
3060.er, was killed, soon after his father's death. They had, also, two daughters, who are
3061. Ah This was a ray of hope. then, thank God for ! " Well that's 1 — ! that same.
3062.nk God for ! " Well that's 1 — ! that same. give wife, — And where are anything
3063.ase, sir ? I'd poor Nancy — that's my will so to find them out." " I would not hav
3064.ut you may as well period. find out the truth now as at a later Those daughters of Mr
3065.n are, I assure you, no credit to their family. One of them married a young man named
3066. assure you, no credit to their family. One of them married a young man named idle,
3067.eir family. One of them married a young man named idle, Sullivan, who is, I am told
3068.e, Sullivan, who is, I am told, a lazy, good-for-nothing fellow, to say the least of
3069.ellow, to say the least of him, and the other about. Sullivan's wife you must excuse
3070. something ; to reclaim, at some future time but, for the present, I think you had b
3071.o- ceeded to give a short sketch of the family history, ending as follows " : Poor Mrs
3072.ed to give a short sketch of the family history, ending as follows " : Poor Mrs. Dillon
3073.e •ettled in my mother, who had given life. her last years of her When you ar« so
3074.of her When you ar« some employment, I will send a person to show MATTERS OF GENERA
3075. show MATTERS OF GENERAL IMPORT you her will 371 last resting-place, and that of her
3076.he had got with a real gentleman, and a good Christ- Brian and Cemetery, his wife pa
3077.they found a handsome head-board iu the form of a cross, bearing the simple inscript
3078.g two graves "now, didn't I tell we had God's blessing to get in with See what a fi
3079. what a fine haudsome head-boarc such a family ? Glory be to they have put over poor J
3080.rayer, kneeling by the tou, Nancy, that God for all his mercies." 37SI BLAKX8 AND F
3081.d So John Flanagan was two thousand the death of Mr. O'Callaghan ; dollars richer by
3082.uivalent for the loss of the kindly old man who had been looked up to as the head o
3083.ad been looked up to as the head of the family ever since Tim's decease. Lawrence Daly
3084.for himself uncle's legacy " gave him a good lift." He and Annie were both careful a
3085.ts with success. They still kept on the same small business, and hoarded up their li
3086.ependent, and able to ghr« their young family a good education. CONCLUSION. Daniel Sh
3087. and able to ghr« their young family a good education. CONCLUSION. Daniel Sheridan
3088.able to ghr« their young family a good education. CONCLUSION. Daniel Sheridan and Jenny
3089.dan and Jenny were going, still 873 the same easy to assist good-hearted couple, abl
3090.oing, still 873 the same easy to assist good-hearted couple, able and willing the ne
3091.ortable Darby and Joan sort of way, the one helping and supporting the other throug
3092.way, the one helping and supporting the other through the various sloughs and rough p
3093.ery year, when the hurry of the paschal life, time was over with their son Peter, th
3094.ar, when the hurry of the paschal life, time was over with their son Peter, they use
3095.th him, sometimes accompanied by Mike's family or Annie's, but more often by themselve
3096. bruised and wounded or tasted of its ; religion had no confutation had ne-- <-r heart,
3097.to those who neglected their p»..duty Mary went oftener to confession, but, s
3098., somehow, its healing balm gave little peace to her mind. She became fretful and irr
3099.s healing balm gave little peace to her mind. She became fretful and irritable subje
3100.patience, ; during which she made every one around her i miserable. The truth was,
3101.e every one around her i miserable. The truth was, that conscience was. lashing both
3102.ow numbered with souls. warnings of the good and wise, seemed, as were, to sear th«
3103.uld not raise their eyes to that better world where sin or sorrow has no place. At ti
3104.e their eyes to that better world where sin or sorrow has no place. At times one or
3105.re sin or sorrow has no place. At times one or the other would begin to yearn for t
3106.orrow has no place. At times one or the other would begin to yearn for the society of
3107. old wounds others. and add on still On one of these occasions, Miles returned home
3108.old me that couldn't see Mrs Henry some time, as she wai CONCLUSION. engaged with co
3109. I heard come, the unnatural young cubs one of them saying If it's my old Irish gra
3110.I didn't give her a look, she never got one, I tell you, and she got as red as a co
3111.and neither did I. Out I walked, and it will be a month of Sundays before ever I cro
3112.nth of Sundays before ever I cross that same threshold again. Those children are gro
3113.e children are growing up in a bad way, mind I tell ; : ' — ^ou, M Mary !" I know
3114.. Blake, " and that is just the way the world goes all over. Like father like and lik
3115.ike daughter. Eliza's ? children aren't one bit better, and how could they how coul
3116.be, when neither Zach nor Eliza has any religion worth speaking of, nor Henry either, an
3117.nor Henry either, and as for Jane, Iver religion isn't worth as having, though she has e
3118.could wish. they always fathers getting Good all obedient children were, and now the
3119.children were, and now they They're are good religious and mothers. contented and ha
3120.y, then, just look at the well liked by God and man, and Flanagans, I'm sure there'
3121. just look at the well liked by God and man, and Flanagans, I'm sure there's not a
3122. I'm sure there's not a more prosperous family in all New so religious York, or a more
3123.o religious York, or a more respectable one, though they're and yet, you used to sa
3124.h they're and yet, you used to say that religion ; didn't pay well all in this country.
3125.l all in this country. think of this in time, Ah, Miles we though it was often told
3126.over again. is Tim Flanagan's grave. It will it is, advice haunts me when himself 1
3127. himself 1 in his tell haunt me do what will, but it I'll you what Mary, don't you b
3128.s of from morning night, my ears like a death-bell, and you must be coming over them
3129.ers worse." This was the termination of many a debate betweevi Miles Blake and his w
3130.alled in by the follower, servant, who, being an old was anxiouh to restore peace. As
3131.ho, being an old was anxiouh to restore peace. As age advanced, these recriminations
3132.ntrived to have Miles and Mary go there one morning under divers became more freque
3133.agan was obliged and pretences, and the good priest exerted all the littlt CONCLUSIO
3134.th parties to a more Christian frame of mind. He at length succeeded in convincing t
3135.improvement visible in both husband and happiness or contentment they did not expect in t
3136.contentment they did not expect in this world, but they were induced to think more of
3137.a solemn character in their eyes by the death of Dr. Power, which took place soon aft
3138.ace soon after. He had told them at the time that he spoke to them while, from the v
3139. spoke to them while, from the verge of eternity, and the event showed that he spoke pro
3140. his office, yet calmly resigned to the will of God, and died as he to awaiting with
3141.ice, yet calmly resigned to the will of God, and died as he to awaiting without liv
3142.nal summons. his He communion with live God, and a martyr Long, long Catholics of i
3143. iniquitous system of lay-trustees. his will memory in the hearts of the New York, a
3144.uitous system of lay-trustees. his will memory in the hearts of the New York, as the m
3145.y in the hearts of the New York, as the man who stood by them troublous times, and
3146.soothed the sorrows of their struggling state with Thank his mild eloquence and his g
3147.w York *mply provided with the means of education. Dr. Power was a mighty man in his gene
3148.ns of education. Dr. Power was a mighty man in his generation in the early day when
3149.rena where the School ques- — — was being agitated, and through his thrice blesse
3150.ns, the Empire City can now boast of as good The Catholic schools as any on the West
3151.hristian Schools and the Jesuit Patheri labor conjointly in the Christian education o
3152.theri labor conjointly in the Christian education of youth, doing for boys what the Ladie
3153.genial rays of faith, hope, or charity. Religion was dead within them, and the world ion
3154. Religion was dead within them, and the world ionable world, was the god ol their wor
3155.dead within them, and the world ionable world, was the god ol their worship. their ch
3156.m, and the world ionable world, was the god ol their worship. their children to the
3157.en to the — the They fash- sent faith same schools where their own had been shipwr
3158.pwrecked, and the consequences were the same, only more decided. Henry T. Blake came
3159.Catholic, his sons went into it without religion of any kind, saving a sort of predilec-
3160.were trained dp by their mother and her family in a wholesome horror laay well be gues
3161.age, race. ail in a crusade against the religion of their fathers and the children of th
3162. all their struggles for 379 freedom of education, and by his eminent talents did good se
3163.ucation, and by his eminent talents did good service to the opposition. a worthy son
3164.eminent talents did good service to the opposition. a worthy son of Ireland was put to the
3165.f Ireland was put to the blush by their Many Henry T. Blake's example, cited for tho
3166.ace and their imitation by creed, : and many a time was the fervent exclamation hear
3167. their imitation by creed, : and many a time was the fervent exclamation heard " I w
3168.e fervent exclamation heard " I wish to God he hadn't a drop of Irish blood in him,
3169. a disgrace to his name." But still the world smiled on Henry T. Blake ; he attained
3170.at the American all bar, and after some time got into the all legislature. Outwardly
3171.y, fine went wrong A intellect, a noble nature, were going rapidly to want of the prun
3172.mocking demon of doubt and restraint of religion. incredulity was gradually taking posse
3173.was gradually taking possession of that soul whence faith had been so early expelled
3174. to any suggestions lis- recommending a change. Mauy a time he was besieged with all t
3175.ions lis- recommending a change. Mauy a time he was besieged with all the reasoning
3176.auy a time he was besieged with all the reasoning and vituperative powers of Tomkins, Pea
3177.tives best known to themselves. have no mind to play the hypocrite, so the notion of
3178.rstanding was awakis ened to the saving knowledge of the truth which in" " Don't mention
3179.kis ened to the saving knowledge of the truth which in" " Don't mention any sacred na
3180. laughing ; " you and I understand each other, Mr. Tomkins, at rend sirs, I least I N
3181.— provided you don't make a Mormon of one or other of your families ; and aggrega
3182.vided you don't make a Mormon of one or other of your families ; and aggregate her to
3183.xtremely disconcerted ; for, to say the truth, each had been calculating on Henry as
3184.culating on Henry as a convert for some time past, and this sudden tion of their hop
3185.s more than they could bear witb took a good solid slice of potted beef, ditto of co
3186. CONCLUSION tie Wl mai of each or so of good old port, to revive the inner reverend
3187.us belief. cious host of their pressing desire, they said, to secure his eternal salva
3188.said, to secure his eternal salvation. "Many me thanks, gentlemen," said Henry, laug
3189.in. Let us eat, drink, and be merry, my good sirs, and leave does religion on the sh
3190. be merry, my good sirs, and leave does religion on the shelf for the present. ' It has
3191. It has been said of old that it ; but, religion wine maketh the heart glad/ so maketh t
3192.n." And well might Henry say so. To him religion wore the lowering aspect of a stern mon
3193.e knew her not as the gentle soother of life's human woe magic glass the one sweet d
3194.her of life's human woe magic glass the one sweet drop in bitter cup — the — th
3195. the humble, hopeful Christian. ness of religion ; He never knew the sweetit ? how, then
3196. knew the sweetit ? how, then, could he love or prize And so it was, too, with his s
3197.ving in her heart, like Henry, that all other religions were but a sham, still, she h
3198.e to her own. Very early in her married life, she left off going to confession, simp
3199.king, : " there's ik ma ! I cannot, and will not have Zachary S82 and all BLAKES AND
3200.ight miserable. of going must only wait chance unknown to any of them." " But, what if
3201.unknown to any of them." " But, what if death came on you ?" before you'd hare the op
3202. fear of that, ma ! I hope I shall have time take to get the last sacraments — sur
3203. to get the last sacraments — surely, God will not me so vv?ry short." " There's
3204.get the last sacraments — surely, God will not me so vv?ry short." " There's no sa
3205. way of thinking myself, but, thanks to God and Father Power, both your father and
3206. have had our eyes opened. about, Eliza death might be nearer than you suppose." " I
3207.id but you're really enough to frighten one almost to death. There'? — : ! no use
3208.really enough to frighten one almost to death. There'? — : ! no use in your taking
3209., for altogether out of the — at some time." A " 6he ; strange presentiment seemed
3210.achary to send her to the Sacred Heart, will and that make Evelina, too, must go whe
3211.lease you, to be nine or ten years old. Will that ma f CONCLUSU Mrs Blake was Baid,
3212.Baid, there N. satisfied 883 ; far from being but, as Eliza give in for no use in tal
3213.r no use in talking, so she had to that time, though the dark foreboding still lay r
3214.a few hours. to live, She had, ; still, time enough make her peace with God it but,
3215. She had, ; still, time enough make her peace with God it but, her whole anxiety was
3216. still, time enough make her peace with God it but, her whole anxiety was to not to
3217.whole anxiety was to not to prepare for death. To the very last she could not believe
3218.d. No no ! ! could not be not cruel — God ; could not be so cruel. Alas God was h
3219.l — God ; could not be so cruel. Alas God was he was only just. in Mr. and their
3220.sion, Zachary helped to keep up the was time enough to send for a priest when there
3221. After the laps^ of half an hour or in, one of them came messenger. him. and set ou
3222.fi the before But he came too late. The soul was already gone Death wab to meet ita
3223.ame too late. The soul was already gone Death wab to meet ita all judge, and to answe
3224. myself I didn't I confess. do anything good can prayers do was able. I didn't the o
3225.d can prayers do was able. I didn't the other world, and mother, here I am on its thr
3226.prayers do was able. I didn't the other world, and mother, here I am on its threshold
3227. I hav'n't prayed to her !" I let every one around me slightingly of her —oh ! 1
3228.oke nied with — poor children Zachary pain ! have pity on them no more. bodily Her
3229.! have pity on them no more. bodily Her death was not accompa ; much but, it was fear
3230. were, with a heavy sorrow Alas for the death of the careless, indifferent Christian.
3231.r : modern times make if it hia " Be my death sudden !" thou wilt, oh. Lord ! but not
3232. indeed, a object with all pitiable his wealth. But Heaven had CONCLUSION. Uft him one
3233.lth. But Heaven had CONCLUSION. Uft him one resource. 385 The Flanagans gathered ro
3234.ife, that might be well to take the old man to with them on account of his money, w
3235.ney." sionally, but, it was no use, The truth was, though she did not say so to her h
3236.de under his Jesuitical teachings. Like many others of her class, she had a very all
3237. of her class, she had a very all vague idea of Catholicity, and knowing nothing at
3238.uits, or what they really were, she was habit of setting in the all good Catholics do
3239.re, she was habit of setting in the all good Catholics down as Jesuits, and it was t
3240.s, and it was the great business of her life to keep her husband from becoming Jesui
3241.Jane's hobby, if hobby she had. Eliza's death for had interfered with her plans consi
3242.or RLAKES AND FLANAGANS. He even had an idea of going to confession, and go as far a
3243.ay afternoon but, a professional friend one fine came up at the moment, and asked h
3244. placed in that Church, and invited the other to go with him. No, he thanked him, he
3245.eat a hurry just then, but, in the Some other time, perhaps off meantime, he took Hen
3246.hurry just then, but, in the Some other time, perhaps off meantime, he took Henry wi
3247.hat was the his guardian- Henry Blake's life, and angel covered his face and wept. C
3248.e his guardian- Henry Blake's life, and angel covered his face and wept. Confession w
3249.as never again thought problematical of life's of, except, perhaps, in a in connecti
3250.h confession-hating people. He folly of will descant eloquent terms on the antiquate
3251.e of holy water, venerating relics, and other such Catholic practices, and will go so
3252. and other such Catholic practices, and will go so f&r as to admit that the first Re
3253.- —the growth of dark and He for poor man I was particularly severe on the Pope,
3254.lone was enough a Catholic. to make any man ashamed of being The States of the Chur
3255. a Catholic. to make any man ashamed of being The States of the Church were always a
3256.lish a fact so honorable to himself the same tinne, and the free country to which he
3257.nd the free country to which he had the happiness of In short, the Pope was a tyrant belo
3258. the worst T. Blake Henry made up his mind to declared against him. fraternize wit
3259.clared against him. fraternize with any man who The Austrian Emperor was bad enough
3260.the temporal power this Pope. turn to one of a From melancholy picture let us mor
3261.l character. Let us visit, for the last time, the quiet, happy home of Tom Reilly an
3262. Reilly and his mother. The blessing of God was in them and on them, and yeaT Tom,
3263.as that Tom never spent his money, like other young men, at the theatre, for Tom had
3264.in mint-juleps, sherry-cobblers, or any other such bacchanalian dev ces. It was no wo
3265. to Staten Island, or Rockaway, or some other watering-place. her compliance, to At M
3266.at*> years, to receive every month. The fate of the Blakes. aH the Dillons was a sal
3267.s duties. Mrs. Reilly and her son had a god-child in every family amongst their fri
3268.ly and her son had a god-child in every family amongst their friends, and one of Mike
3269.every family amongst their friends, and one of Mike Sheridan's boys was called afte
3270.led after Father OTlynn, of illustrious memory. This was a compliment that won the goo
3271.ory. This was a compliment that won the good lady's heart, and many a handsome suit
3272.ent that won the good lady's heart, and many a handsome suit of clothes, and many a
3273.nd many a handsome suit of clothes, and many a costly toy was provided by her for th
3274. any cloud over- shadowed Mrs. Reilly's mind, or any difficulty arose in Fred Fitzge
3275.s, for Mrs. Flana- gan was and ever the same prudent, judicious, kindly creature, an
3276.creature, and she was looked up to with love and respect, still not only by her own
3277. and respect, still not only by her own family, but by every one with whom she was acq
3278.ot only by her own family, but by every one with whom she was acquainted. It it is
3279.ary to marry again, and his second wife being a Protestant, of some advanced sect, po
3280.ION. were brought up in evangelical 381 religion— I am not quite That was what their s
3281.Unitarianism. mother professed, though, being rather a strong-minded woman, she consi
3282. Thomson had none of her own to claim a religion for herself and modify her own peculiar
3283.ke became quite hostile to the Flanagan family on account of Miles's expected legacy.
3284.rts or observations reached them, and " Time will to say that hypocrisy tell," was t
3285.r observations reached them, and " Time will to say that hypocrisy tell," was their
3286. Miles to They had done all thev make a will in favor of his was induced to grandchi
3287.however, he make a compromise, dividing one-half of his money between the children
3288.ren of Henry and Eliza, and leaving the other half for distribution amongst the Catho
3289.id, they would not have their names the will on any account, for fear of giving scan
3290.as not to be known till Miles'a handle. death, which had not occurred fbmilv when we
3291.S that I have brought And now would beg will my story to a close, I all Catholic par
3292. or like Hannah and Celia Dillon. Under God, it depends entirely on themselves. I h
3293.as we it see occurring every day in the world around us, growing out of the effects o
3294.round us, growing out of the effects of good or bad education. If be true fear it is
3295.owing out of the effects of good or bad education. If be true fear it is — that —and
3296.t the body in comparison to that of the soul ? Ah ie would be well if Catholic paren
3297.y consider that they are accountable to God and his Church for the precious gift of
3298., and are so act are 1 who bound, under pain of deadly sin, to transmit it to their
3299.t are 1 who bound, under pain of deadly sin, to transmit it to their children pure
3300.nger worth having. The faith of a young man or a if young woman, brought up under u
3301.old of the jeweller. In conclusion, " I will lay before the reader some appro prmte
3302.foreign countries fathers, ; and, if we desire to make this increase permanent, and to
3303. This can only be done by giving them a good Catholic education. In our present posi
3304. be done by giving them a good Catholic education. In our present position, the school-ho
3305.y to the House of We as ; have abundant cause for thankfulness to God itself. God on
3306.have abundant cause for thankfulness to God itself. God on on account of the many b
3307.t cause for thankfulness to God itself. God on on account of the many blessings whi
3308.to God itself. God on on account of the many blessings which he has conferred but we
3309.ssings which he has conferred but we if will show ourselves unworthy of these bless
3310.l that is iu our power to promote every good work by which they may be increased asu
3311.ut renewal. 2. Books may be renewed for one week only. 3. Students who damage or lo
3312.of posed for each overdue. 5. two cents will be imday that the book is Reserved book
3313.ng. Failure to return a Reserve book on time subjects the borrower to a fine of 15 c

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: https://concordances.library.nd.edu/app/