Concordance for An adventure with the Apaches / by Gabriel Ferry [pseud.]

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1.   ireship 6 Contents. CHAPTER A Brilliant Idea VIII. PAOK 118 CHAPTER IX. Betwken Hope
2. nd related his habitual speechlessness, one of the his many adventures that had bef
3. habitual speechlessness, one of the his many adventures that had befallen friend Eod
4. over, by a vigorous growth of osiers or other interlacing shoots. But nearly opposite
5. pposite the large islet was a of rather space It completely stripped vegetation. was
6. buffaloes in order to reach the river. space it And through islet to this was possib
7. the Prairie. 9 bottom of the river-bed. Other trees had been wrecked against still th
8. aft. All this must have happened a long time ago; many summers and winters must have
9. his must have happened a long time ago; many summers and winters must have passed, f
10. hefore he an willi un a year a.;-; lie will he ahle to mareh Ion;-; we ilo oiiniel
11. endors of the wilderness. Fatigue alone will not account for the alteration in him."
12. onsense ! As if ! the wilderness were I will not preferable to cities undertake to m
13. ferable to cities undertake to make him life. prefer a wandering to a sedentary it W
14. not to bestir himself, to the fight, to experience powerful emotions of desert places that
15. powerful emotions of desert places that man was born?" " Certainly," replied Pepe,
16. the Canadian. " I shall leave Fabian at liberty to follow his inclinations, but at the
17. to follow his inclinations, but at the same time I shall make him love this en- A c
18. ollow his inclinations, but at the same time I shall make him love this en- A chanti
19. , but at the same time I shall make him love this en- A chanting Scene on the Prairi
20. nting Scene on the Prairie. fatigues 13 life of and perils. Con- sider for a moment,
21. the wilderness seem preferable to that one obtains after a day of lazy security in
22. olor, at this boundless immensity where man roams in his primeval liberty like the
23. mensity where man roams in his primeval liberty like the bird that hovers in the region
24. Prairie. Canadian willingly enough, and habit had rendered a roving secret charm. lif
25. bit had rendered a roving secret charm. life to him also full of " Look/' continued
26. t feeding-grounds. See how they come up God in all the haughty beauty that gives to
27. how they come up God in all the haughty beauty that gives to un- tamed animals, with w
28. edwood; possibly his dreams, the dreams one has at his ago, are showing him more gr
29. h joy in the intoxication of their wild liberty \" " Yes ! Up to the moment when the In
30. ed the Canadian, struggling against his judgment. still " Now the brilliant scene change
31. yes its two and its black muzzle in the space between the trees? He smells the wind,
32. ll you; perhaps, in- stead of this fine animal, his dreams are showing him crowded edi
33. es come together pursue and tear him to life Possibly his chances of would Every- be
34. s chances of would Every- be greater in one of our royal parks. thing in its own ti
35. ne of our royal parks. thing in its own time. Redwood; maturity loves silence, youth
36. l struggling gall was the drop of which God ness; distils into every cup of happi-
37. ould be no per- fect felicity, for then death as would be too great a pain; He also w
38. for then death as would be too great a pain; He also wills that there : A Scene on
39. e too for otherwise it much unmitigated evil, would be too painful his to live. The
40. fell into a sad reverie, glancing from time to time at the sleeping Fabian, while P
41. to a sad reverie, glancing from time to time at the sleeping Fabian, while Pepe was
42. ou say, he is cer- tainly the emblem of life in the wilderness." " Shall I waken Fab
43. ilderness." " Shall I waken Fabian this time ?" asked the Canadian, w\i\i an air of
44. ertainly,'^ returned the Spaniard, " he will seldom see anything like that." " The f
45. ng like that." " The fact like it is he will never see anything in any city," exclai
46. he enchanted 18 A Scene on the Prairie. will Canadian ; " such scenes the wilderness
47. " such scenes the wilderness." make him love And the old hunter first gently shook t
48. old hunter first gently shook the young man, after warning him by too suddenly. voi
49. on, the acting as hunter could discover other wolves sentinels, watching the to effor
50. 0 Pursuers and Pursued. These the noble animal either did not see or else disdained th
51. ngue hanging out of his mouth, the poor animal advanced just to the edge of the stream
52. "Come, like my it. child, we shall see many more Here you see only the worst side o
53. s of the great Northern lakes—" " The animal has just got rid of his 22 Pursuers and
54. eyes bleeding, howling with hunger and desire, while others, less courageous, ran mad
55. answer. " Crouch down, crouch down, for God's sake ! behind the bushes," said lie,
56. " the Indians are in chase And in fact other more terrible hunters appeared in their
57. only three Indians were visible ; but, one after another, nearly a score emerged a
58. ous career to Fabian. the For the first time at a similar moment face of the fearles
59. n affection in the heart of the bravest man makes him loves tremble for hmn his who
60. emble for hmn his whom he more than own life, and that ad- venturers like ourselves
61. ourselves ought to have no ties in this world. as There is Eedwood growing weak as a
62. yes all were following these tumultuous man- oeuvers witliout seeming to dn!ad the
63. gers which ho wns braving for the first time, Pursuers and Pursued. 27 Redwood sough
64. rils more threatening than the unlikely one of being discovered. "Ah !" he began, "
65. re threatening than the unlikely one of being discovered. "Ah !" he began, " these ar
66. e are scenes which ; dwellers in cities will never see it is only in the wilderness
67. eased speaking; for he felt that he his life if would have given a year of w-ere not
68. recognize him with a shudder as a white man. a Christian like themselves. 28 Pursue
69. his unfortunate, suddenly discovered in one of the evolutions of the Indian chase,
70. oat Pepe looked inquiringly at Eedwood. life "I am answerable God," said for your be
71. ingly at Eedwood. life "I am answerable God," said for your before the Canadian, it
72. but three against twenty. of three The life is men, yours especially, Fabian, more
73. lly, Fabian, more precious than that of one; we must leave this poor fellow to his
74. nty of these Indians now; a bullet from one of our rifles should lay out one of tho
75. t from one of our rifles should lay out one of those red devils, you would presentl
76. y see a hundred instead of twenty ; may God forgive my hard-heartedness, but to it
77. s necessary." Fabian yielded this final reasoning. fleeing Meanwhile the white horseman w
78. Meanwhile the white horseman was like a man who has no resource but the swiftness o
79. aught him, and violently lifted unhappy man, lost from the saddle, his balance and
80. ity sternation. and con- " Thanks be to God !" said Fabian, " they have not killed
81. ith bruises from his of the Apaches and one still removed the lasso, which confined
82. ilence maintained by these Indians is a sign that every one of them he is considerin
83. d by these Indians is a sign that every one of them he is considerinflict ing what
84. onsiderinflict ing what sort of torture will upon him. white They prefer the capture
85. ey prefer the capture to that of a of a man whole troop of the wild horses they wer
86. dress distinguished riors, him from the other warif sprang from his horse as he dis-
87. le deliberation, because a more serious matter demanded attention. Throwre- ing the br
88. d attention. Throwre- ing the bridle to one of the band, who Discovered! ceived 33
89. " said Redwood, " and in that case he * will find the Who knows? 34 Discovered! trac
90. in any ordinary human body. During this time the deliberation over the fate of the p
91. ing this time the deliberation over the fate of the prisoner had doubtless come to a
92. suddenly greeted a proposition made by one of the Indians. But it was necessary to
93. arriors to wait for him; then, with the same measured river, five tread, he advanced
94. rses of the 36 Discovered! prairies. No one but an Indian could have failed to be d
95. g-trumpet of his hand, and shouted in a language half Indian, half Spanish: " The white
96. him; crosses the deserts but a white is man who neither an eagle nor a salmon/' " N
97. stand the intentions of Black Bird they will come out of their hiding-place," contin
98. ies ; of those of the South their their language and God are different. The Apaches have
99. e of the South their their language and God are different. The Apaches have a whole
100. riors in their If the Xorthern warriors will join their rifle guns to those of the I
101. ifle guns to those of the Indians, they will share with them the scalps, the treas-
102. es, the horses of the men of the South, will and the Indians and the white men dance
103. of their camp." Discovered! 39 at each other Eedwood and Pepe looked in astonishment
104. anation, also understood that they were being offered an alliance which their conscie
105. nostrils proved that the noble were of one mind on this subject, to perish rather
106. trils proved that the noble were of one mind on this subject, to perish rather than
107. d in rifle a whisper, " the bullet of a good would, carry my reply." The Indian, how
108. r to follow than the trace of the white man. indicates to The trace of the buffalo
109. its meagerness, the place it is and the time when passed by. islet Behind is the ree
110. nd is the reeds of the floating there a man as strong as a bison, taller rifle; tha
111. fle; than the longest he has with him a man of mixed blood, both Xorthern and South
112. o are stronger and always espouse their cause." " The sagacity of those dogs ble," sa
113. flatters you," replied Pepe, whose self-love seemed wounded. "I am " waiting for the
114. !" said Pepe; "the is speaking his real language; he not very squeamish in seeking allie
115. entado, Ni amigo reconciliado."* At the same time Black Bird signed the captive to a
116. o, Ni amigo reconciliado."* At the same time Black Bird signed the captive to approa
117. nted out to him with his finger an open space between two clumps islet. of osier on t
118. on to the livid pallor of the un- happy man's countenance, but a customary designat
119. y designation of the color of the white man's skin, —" can it send a bullet into
120. kin, —" can it send a bullet into the space tall separating those two plants yonder
121. hereupon Black Bird said a few words to one of his warriors, who placed in the hand
122. s, who placed in the hands of the white man the rifle they had seized, priso- and t
123. o to bottom. from top " The poor fellow will not even touch the ; islet," said Pepe,
124. nconcernedly " and if the Indian has no other speak, means I of making us until to- n
125. ans I of making us until to- not a word will say morrow." The white fired, and, in f
126. wild horses with greater freedom. Five other warriors immediately departed in their
127. efore firing," he went on, " the Indian will await an answer from the concealed whit
128. wer from the concealed whites and count one hundred." " Place yourself behind me, F
129. would give the Indian's bullet a double chance." Without disturbing a single green fri
130. es, Fabian," said Pepe, tranquilly. "No man ever had a nobler shield than this gian
131. wheads flew into the air; but, kneeling one behind the other, the three hunters did
132. o the air; but, kneeling one behind the other, the three hunters did Discovered! 47 n
133. as deceived ; his mistake. he admits He will go and look elsewhere for the white war
134. h with that poor fel- low yonder, which will not take long, for the torture of a whi
135. t take long, for the torture of a white man is a sight which an Indian is always in
136. ays in a hurry to enjoy." it " But then will Fabian, " to that wretch not be time,"
137. en will Fabian, " to that wretch not be time," exclaimed effort in favor of make som
138. make some who is expecting a frightful death?" Redwood in his turn interrogated his
139. Indian may still we show ourselves, he will doubt no longer."' The old man took a t
140. ves, he will doubt no longer."' The old man took a thoughtful attitude. " To accept
141. h the heat of passion. possess the cool courage But did the boy which faces death he th
142. ool courage But did the boy which faces death he that stoic res- unspurrcd by anger ?
143. h the Spaniard and himself had given so many proofs? test. ; The Ca- nadian resorted
144. id he " can a I make you understand the language of man? Discovered! 49 Will not your he
145. a I make you understand the language of man? Discovered! 49 Will not your heart be
146. and the language of man? Discovered! 49 Will not your heart be frozen by the words t
147. ur ears?" " Why should you doubt my may courage ?" answered Fabian, simply, in a tone o
148. eproach. listen to " Whatever you say I will without blenching; it whatever you may
149. ut blenching; it whatever you may do, I will do is also without trembling." " Fabian
150. o without trembling." " Fabian speaking truth, Pepe/' cried the Canadian. " See how h
151. oudly contradicts the simplicity of his language." And in the enthusiasm of his joy he t
152. than Our enemies outnumber us seven to one. each of us still Should kill seven war
153. l seven warriors, there would remain as many as ourselves." have done as "We much be
154. rupted Pepe. 50 Discovered! " Well ! We will do it again/' exclaimed Fabian. Tlie Ca
155. ver happens, we shall never part again. God will do the rest, and we will try to sa
156. happens, we shall never part again. God will do the rest, and we will try to save th
157. art again. God will do the rest, and we will try to save that unfortunate man." " *'
158. nd we will try to save that unfortunate man." " *' To work then !" Not yet, cried F
159. in two gunshots of the shore. The white man was some distance in front of this line
160. e demons intend to give themsel ves the pleasure of a chase." " How is that ?" said Fabi
161. w is that ?" said Fabian. little " They will give their captive a ad- vantage in dis
162. signal, 51 52 Running the Gauntlet. he will make his spring forward. Then the India
163. ke his spring forward. Then the Indians will run after him, lance or toma- hawk agil
164. toma- hawk agile, in hand. If the white man's legs are first, he will reach the riv
165. . If the white man's legs are first, he will reach the river and we will shout to hi
166. e first, he will reach the river and we will shout to him to swim over to us. A will
167. will shout to him to swim over to us. A will rest few rifle shots will protect him,
168. over to us. A will rest few rifle shots will protect him, islet and he reach the saf
169. et and he reach the safe and sound. The will be our affair. his legs, as it But his
170. the first Indian that catches up to him will either break his head with the blow of
171. gh with do our best." a lance. case, we will At this moment the five Indians who had
172. und compassion at the unfortunate white man, who, with hag- Running the Gauntlet. g
173. chief. a fearful It was moment, for the man-hunt was about to begin. In the islet a
174. when Black Bird suddenly made fer for a sign to dethis frightto an instant the openi
175. . was a gesture easy compre- hend. With one finger he pointed to the bare feet of h
176. s warriors; then he desig- nated in the same way the boots of Cordova leather which
177. by betraying yourself too soon, deprive life that poor wretch of tection his' last c
178. e that poor wretch of tection his' last chance of — our pro- when he comes within gu
179. about to be enacted. At last the white man was erect for the second time, and the
180. the white man was erect for the second time, and the Indians, with one bare foot th
181. the second time, and the Indians, with one bare foot thrust out in front, devoured
182. agger. he was some distance ahead, when one of the Indians reached thrust furiously
183. The weapon passed between the body and one his arm of the victim, and the Indian,
184. d. For an instant about pick- the white man seemed to hesitate ing up the lance dro
185. ous of a single chances of this contest man against a score of enemies. All of a su
186. ingle mo- ment, the wind opened a clear space in the cloud of dust. the Indian Eedwoo
187. is unexpected occurrence, followed by a war-cry from both the Canadian and the Span
188. hunter shuddered with dignation. in- " life Oh !" said he, " if there is is a spark
189. spark of in him, if he only scalped, we will save him yet, for one does not die of t
190. only scalped, we will save him yet, for one does not die of that I call God to witn
191. et, for one does not die of that I call God to witness." this generous oath, As the
192. sist- ance?" said he. And for the first time his osiers. head rose above the fringe
193. e a willow wand, the Apaches recognized one of their formidable Northern 58 Running
194. still held in his hands, contracted in death, the hair of the white warrior. At up t
195. lutely reso- entered the river. Any it other man the Avoukl have been covered by up
196. y reso- entered the river. Any it other man the Avoukl have been covered by up to h
197. o Fabian; yours, "my hand is surer than will and my Kentucky rifle carry twice as fa
198. eep your weapon makes a in position. If one of those dogs it movement, leave to me
199. barrel of his fire at rifle, the least sign of hostility on their part. still Meanw
200. reloaded fire and was ready to a second time. There was a moment dians, to pick of h
201. or wretch, clinging had the presence of mind liverer's arms at liberty, and the Cana
202. the presence of mind liverer's arms at liberty, and the Canadian, Running the Gauntlet
203. Indian responded to the explosion by a death-cry. like retreat In a word, this lion-
204. e sand of the islet the almost fainting man. " There are three of them out of the r
205. you have a rifle like Kentucky ours you will be a very good marksman." The momentary
206. e like Kentucky ours you will be a very good marksman." The momentary success he had
207. ing the Gauntlet. to the scalped fully, man, who was groaning dole- he said: arrive
208. d, but console yourself, it is no great matter. the I have many a friend in same predi
209. self, it is no great matter. the I have many a friend in same predicament who enjoys
210. eat matter. the I have many a friend in same predicament who enjoys very good it hea
211. end in same predicament who enjoys very good it health notwithstanding; saves a lot
212. withstanding; saves a lot of is all. is time in combing one's hair, and that Your li
213. ves a lot of is all. is time in combing one's hair, and that Your life is safe for
214. me in combing one's hair, and that Your life is safe for the moment, and that the es
215. kull rags torn from the clothing of the man a served to keep in position on his lar
216. the Gauntlet. 63 stantly cherished the idea of keeping Fabian with him, " it is nec
217. ed with more vivid colors. Be- yond the space between the so noisy a while since, tre
218. " It's they receive reinforcements?" a chance to run, a terrible chance, lives are in
219. orcements?" a chance to run, a terrible chance, lives are in the but our plied fears h
220. are in the but our plied fears hands of God," to re- Eedwood, brought sadly back hi
221. resh application of cool water, fellow, man by a and the poor relieved for the mome
222. of reeds and count how leaves. Did you many if rifles the Indians had?" " Seven, Pe
223. e defenders of the islet from more than one deadly attack. "Do you see, Fabian," sa
224. ks as you were in a stone fortress. You will only be exposed to bullets which may co
225. xposed to bullets which may come from I will the tree-tops on the shore, but manage
226. ps on the shore, but manage so that not one of those devils shall ever get up so hi
227. a sufficient barrier between Fabian and death, and showed his station him behind the
228. ood of islet Pepe, "that the base every time trembled to its very we made an eifort
229. of wood?" "Yes/' thought it said Pepe; "one would have from its was going to tear i
230. ch the labored breathing of the wounded man and the rippling of the water against t
231. unds that broke the profound silence of nature at the hour of sunset. The surface of t
232. ir prey. them the Scripture speaks." No one replied to this remark of the Ca- nadia
233. , ; of the trees took on a glaze of but habit had given the two hun- the Canadian and
234. iers than are fed by sap from The young man pushed aside the rushes gently and look
235. the landscape imprint themselves on the memory and become precious indicalife, tions;
236. that the In- dians have employed their time in cutting those branches and of making
237. rtable shelters them ; but, to tell the truth, they have a trifle too much contempt f
238. ian," Pepe. went on the addressing " It will be an easy target for part, fire him ;
239. ptly ended. Two the shots parted at the same time from seem but one. islet in such a
240. ended. Two the shots parted at the same time from seem but one. islet in such a way
241. s parted at the same time from seem but one. islet in such a way as to The pretende
242. s, and the osiers added branches of the other clump of shook convulsively. Pepe, Fabi
243. which scattered as they upon them, the war-cry of the Indians taken ears. by surpr
244. and stuck them into the ground to keep good an account of their rose dead."' Kedwoo
245. ind that moves them.. is No doubt it is one of those rascals who climbing or has cl
246. st then a bullet came to make a hole in one of the trunks of which the raft was com
247. make side. that blunder, but would aim one Lie down, Fabian, and you, too, Pepe, l
248. me act; within a minute you v/ill bear one of their balls whistle to right or left
249. In less His conjecture proved correct. time than he had mentioned, the Indian's bul
250. an enemy the less." fired at The hunter one of the forks of the aspen where he saw
251. n where he saw a red tint which, to any other of eye, would have looked leaf, like th
252. age yells broke out with such fury that one would have needed muscles of to steel n
253. udder with fright. Even the wounded re- man, who had not been awakened by the 76 Th
254. in the forest roaring and replying a to one another as if there were hundred of the
255. uld induce them to cross the water, not one of them would go tell back to his villa
256. Iheir The Stratagem. 77 As if a sudden idea had crossed his mind, his Eedwood made
257. 77 As if a sudden idea had crossed his mind, his Eedwood made their backs. companio
258. to return without our scalps, and they will decide on coming to us." This resolve o
259. er instant by a new discharge. But this time, likewise, the islet remained as silent
260. likewise, the islet remained as silent death. and gloomy as " Is not that one of the
261. lent death. and gloomy as " Is not that one of the dogs climbing up the willow agai
262. e without budging any more than It is a chance to run. tell we were dead men. will The
263. a chance to run. tell we were dead men. will Then he go and his companions that he c
264. , with an audacity which the example of one of his companions, killed on that very
265. ok aim once more, and then repeated the same manoeuver several times in succession.
266. m back the bad turn he has given me, it will be because the bullet he is going to se
267. e finally and concluded to fire. At the same instant from a tree a splinter detached
268. sprinkled the Canadian's face. " Is any one wounded ?" he asked, in a trembling voi
269. thing but a scratch," responded Pepe. " God be praised !" The Indian gave another s
270. er the all and moon shone above without life. the red warriors giving any sign of "
271. thout life. the red warriors giving any sign of " Our scalps tempt them, but they ar
272. not venture to tear the body of a dead man until it has begun to decay, but finall
273. finally conclude to do so. The Apaches will act like vultures. Now let us resume ou
274. ters did so with great caution, keeping one knee to the ground, and began anew to w
275. owing confidence; in the end, the their war- Canadian counted ten of them, paint pl
276. bout them, are going to cross the river one be- hind the other," said Eedwood; "Fab
277. ing to cross the river one be- hind the other," said Eedwood; "Fabian, you will take
278. the other," said Eedwood; "Fabian, you will take aim at the first one, Pepe in the
279. "Fabian, you will take aim at the first one, Pepe in the middle, and I at the next
280. can only approach us distance from each other, and at a we shall have a better chance
281. other, and at a we shall have a better chance. It will be a hand-to-hand 84 The Strat
282. at a we shall have a better chance. It will be a hand-to-hand 84 The Stratagem. Fab
283. await them, knife in hand, to do is you will have to reload our weapons and pass the
284. ss them of your mother, I to us. By the memory forbid you to measure your strength aga
285. knife." As the Canadian was concluding vice, a tall this ad- warrior entered the ri
286. caution that not a sound betrayed their progress. One might have fancied them riors, gho
287. at not a sound betrayed their progress. One might have fancied them riors, ghostly
288. arching upon the waters. To the Indians death seemed to hover islet above the surroun
289. oonlight falling upon the gun-barrel of one of the hunters had warned him, suddenly
290. ire !" exclaimed Eedwood. closed At the same moment the Indian who the line fell int
291. eir chief But the disappearance and the death of three of their fellows had dis~ conc
292. Come dogs, !'' vultures, women without courage yelled the Spaniard, at seeing his enem
293. betrayed that it was not that of a dead man, although the extended arms and the imm
294. m think so. ! "My is rifle, Fabian, for God's sake There let- Black Bird pretending
295. d like live coals in their sockets, not one of his muscles quivered. Pepe lowered h
296. acity with which In- dians cling to the idea of revenge. *' Not a doubt of it," said
297. ith there were only us two, gaining the other side of the river would not take a minu
298. but Fabian scalped ! and that wretched man they can not abandon to the whom we mer
299. ! At any rate, we The Enemy Reinforced. will not attempt flight until the 91 moon go
300. he 91 moon goe& down." And upon the old man bent his head down his knees with an ai
301. be eight. add three more and that left, will There should be twelve and I why did we
302. listen with a feeling akin to anxiety. "Will that cursed moon never go down?" said h
303. d-heaven, and 94 2'he Enemy Reinforced. nature was slumbering underneath her canopy of
304. gave a sudden start and looked at each other in stupefaction. Yells had risen simult
305. d the sounds I heard. Now who knows how many enemies we have around us?" " What matt
306. e Indians, the vultures, at all events, will lose by it." " Don't go to singing your
307. lose by it." " Don't go to singing your death-song like the Indians, who, when they a
308. taken." "And why it not ? It is a very good custom aids a man to die well to rememb
309. n." "And why it not ? It is a very good custom aids a man to die well to remember that
310. t not ? It is a very good custom aids a man to die well to remember that he has liv
311. ll to remember that he has lived like a man." " Better to be thinking of dying like
312. give you I could earthly greatness; at other times think of nothing for you but the
313. majestic harmonies which caress is lull man as he lies down to sleep and him at his
314. be in we shall find ourselves together death? So young, so brave, so beautiful, must
315. brave, so beautiful, must yours be the same man's who to-morrow " fate as that of a
316. e, so beautiful, must yours be the same man's who to-morrow " fate as that of a ?''
317. yours be the same man's who to-morrow " fate as that of a ?'' will be useless Who wo
318. s who to-morrow " fate as that of a ?'' will be useless Who would love me when you w
319. that of a ?'' will be useless Who would love me when you were no longer here ?" repl
320. d closed above all that I loved, living being and the only place was you. who could t
321. take its What have I to regret in this world ?" The Enemy Reinforced. 97 "The future
322. as that of the whom he had wounded. Two war- riors, in fact, were giving him the su
323. he support of their arms. " What is the good of opening our ears ?" he shouted in st
324. rd and despise his promises." " That is good !" replied the chief. " The whites are
325. untains, who disdains the lan- guage of other birds." " What do you want of him ?" in
326. o hear the Northern warrior ask for his life," replied the chief. " I have a differe
327. I listen," replied the Indian. " If you will swear on the honor of a warrior, on the
328. the Indian. " If you will swear on the honor of a warrior, on the bones of your fath
329. on the bones of your fathers, that you will spare the lives of my three companions.
330. ree companions. The Enemy Reinforced. I will cross the river alone 99 and unarmed, a
331. ver alone 99 and unarmed, and bring you will my scalp fresh on my head. That tempt h
332. d wished the Xortliern white to ask for life, and instead he asks for to : death. in
333. for life, and instead he asks for to : death. ing. They can not come This is an unde
334. s is an understandthe Northern I what I desire let man leave his companions, and swear
335. erstandthe Northern I what I desire let man leave his companions, and swear to him
336. companions, and swear to him on of the honor of a warrior, on the bones fathers, tha
337. warrior, on the bones fathers, that his life shall be spared, ; my but only his the
338. shall be spared, ; my but only his the other three must die." Redwood scorned to rep
339. e the whites are listening for the last time to the voice of a chief. islet, My warr
340. flow in return. But the Indian does not desire that blood heated by the ardor of the f
341. with terror, impoverished by hunger. He will take the whites alive, his clutches, an
342. bone of dried buffalo, then the Indian will see what fear will men imbruted by thei
343. alo, then the Indian will see what fear will men imbruted by their entrails ; and pr
344. ave in he make a ski:-!, saddle for his war-horse out of their scalps will their an
345. e for his war-horse out of their scalps will their and each of hang The Enemy Reinfo
346. all surround as the island for days and many nights, if necessary, to seize the outc
347. boasting; the sight of their skeletons will trouble nothing but your dreams despise
348. d made at Black Bird the most insulting one that he could think of. 102 The Enemy R
349. " " if Ah !" said the generous old let man, sighing, you had all me alone I would
350. true ! we have not much food. Faith we will fish for our dinner and amuse ourselves
351. s he said these words the Canadian tore one of the up, but not without several effo
352. refuge; trunk imitated pretty well the form of the human head. The old hunter laid
353. Apache cannot a stick of distinguish a man from a wood? And " there is man among u
354. guish a man from a wood? And " there is man among us who canno+ swim." Who is that
355. ?" at the The Spaniard pointed wounded man, 106 The FiresMp. if his groaning on hi
356. FiresMp. if his groaning on his bed of pain, as ian angel were warning guard- him h
357. his groaning on his bed of pain, as ian angel were warning guard- him him that there
358. . question of abandoning " What does it matter ?" resumed Red" Is the life of wood, wi
359. t does it matter ?" resumed Red" Is the life of wood, with some hesitation. that man
360. ife of wood, with some hesitation. that man worth as much as ours?" ; " No/' replie
361. now that it would be cowardly." " That man," added Fabian, " has dren, chil- perha
362. ip. 107 " Well, Fabian, since you are a good swimmer, take the route which is open t
363. e route which is open to us. Pepe and I will stay here to protect this man, and if w
364. pe and I will stay here to protect this man, and if we die here it will be as victi
365. protect this man, and if we die here it will be as victims of duty and with the joy
366. if we die here it will be as victims of duty and with the joy of knowing that you ar
367. n," said he, " that I do not want you." life without you two, and shall stay with "
368. t us the look," said Fabian and Pepe at same time. This was, unhappily, one of those
369. the look," said Fabian and Pepe at same time. This was, unhappily, one of those case
370. Pepe at same time. This was, unhappily, one of those cases where all human resource
371. ere all human resources are unavailing; one of those desperate situations from whic
372. t a power above that of extricate them. man could be- In vain did the night come da
373. rm resolution not to desert the wounded man opposed an insurmountable obstacle to P
374. he excepriver, fires, which colored the one would have thought, judging from the pe
375. ssive spread all silence of night over- nature, sleep fled from the three hunters. If
376. ters. If there are frightful moments in life when the bravest men can lose heart, as
377. es the fact that the inevitable, it was one of them. danger was terrible, did not a
378. id not afford even the supreme and sell life as final consolation of a chance to dea
379. and sell life as final consolation of a chance to dearly as possible. Hemmed in by ene
380. e them succumb to a murderous fire. The death of soldiers on a field of battle would
381. chief. He wanted his enemies with both soul and body weakened by hunger. Affected b
382. , but they resigned themselves to their fate rather than think of abandoning the wou
383. er than think of abandoning the wounded man in order to make a descent on one or th
384. unded man in order to make a descent on one or the other bank. to Fabian was as res
385. n order to make a descent on one or the other bank. to Fabian was as resolved die as
386. ich had taken possession of him, robbed death of some of rors; its usual ter- neverth
387. Ill would have made him prefer a speedy death, with arms in his hands, to the slow an
388. his hands, to the slow and ignominious one awaiting him at the stake of the Indian
389. ; " not merely the Indians on the bank, life in but everything that has deserts; the
390. Would 112 The fHreship. not this be the time to effect a descent on one or the other
391. this be the time to effect a descent on one or the other of the two banks?" " The I
392. time to effect a descent on one or the other of the two banks?" " The Indians sleepi
393. t, and which sues its course to the the same purgulfs into unknown which it will be
394. the same purgulfs into unknown which it will be lost. You would the river not have m
395. nd was seeking that of Fabian; Math the other he pointed at the wounded man, who was
396. ath the other he pointed at the wounded man, who was writhing, even though asleep,
397. 's objections. " But, in default of any other chance," pursued the latter, " we shoul
398. ections. " But, in default of any other chance," pursued the latter, " we should at le
399. t have The Fireship. that of dying with honor, as 113 and side by side, we wish to di
400. he help of this poor fellow, who has no other defenders. If we are over- come, could
401. defenders. If we are over- come, could God Himself reproach us when we appear befo
402. f reproach us when we appear before the life of the care Him with having sacrificed
403. aving sacrificed confided to our in the man He had when we had exposed our own inte
404. ood re- " but let us still hope in that God who has united us by a miracle; what do
405. ay may happen to-morrow still ; we have time to spare between now and the ex- hausti
406. on the shore would be to go to certain death, since the is number of In- dians proba
407. t least prolongs for a few days my dis- happiness in being near you." Silence reigned onc
408. ngs for a few days my dis- happiness in being near you." Silence reigned once more ov
409. ore over the mayed group. cliild a This idea of living near his while longer was to
410. n his rage, so Redwood, anticipating in imagination the day of the denouement, shook convul
411. nouement, shook convul- terrible sively one of the tree-trunks against which ho was
412. s!'" exclaimed The Fireship. at the 115 same moment the Spaniard, who could " Look !
413. clouds. The three hunters had scarcely time to be surprised by the apparition of th
414. light before they had comprehended its cause. Long experience ness in the life of th
415. e they had comprehended its cause. Long experience ness in the life of the wilder- and its
416. its cause. Long experience ness in the life of the wilder- and its incessantly repe
417. l calmness. He knew that a danger which one faces is with coolness frightful as it
418. ounted, appear, and his presence may of mind generally became redoubled in case of p
419. y, of the Cana- and thus confirming the truth dian's words. Already, amidst the water
420. with which mean to ignite our isle." is God be thanked!" added Fabian; "it far bett
421. far better to fight fire than to await death in this way without is a struggle." " T
422. action of the flame, and would have no chance of escaping the except by jumping into
423. e them alive. CHAPTER VIII. A BRILLIANT IDEA, Such had been the calculation of the I
424. d mingled with the fog, 118 A Brilliant Idea. 119 flame which constantly increased.
425. tly increased. Not to far from the bank one caught from time time a glimpse of the
426. ot to far from the bank one caught from time time a glimpse of the red profile of an
427. far from the bank one caught from time time a glimpse of the red profile of an Indi
428. on, ; imp of hell!" said he in an least will " you at never tell the story in your v
429. your village of the last moments of the death agony of a Christian.'' As he said thes
430. h the rushes, and they saw the Indian's war plumes at the sink down same moment tha
431. he Indian's war plumes at the sink down same moment that the dis- charge of the fire
432. ilence without a siugle 120 A Brilliant Idea. yell accompanying, as is usual, the de
433. ea. yell accompanying, as is usual, the death throes of a warrior. The flame far away
434. now that I have sent before me into the other world one of those redskinced devils."
435. at I have sent before me into the other world one of those redskinced devils." And st
436. ave sent before me into the other world one of those redskinced devils." And still
437. med Pepe, it whose all rage blinded his judgment, " is very fine to be studying that fir
438. hat firebrand, but can you A. Brilliant Idea. 121 fastens turn it out of its course
439. omething which convinces me that the is reasoning of these sons of the forest fallible, n
440. dried by con- 122 A with the Brilliant Idea. tact fire above and become en- kindled
441. had the large branches of the tree had time on the to take fire, which had acted so
442. bullets and arrows whistled A Brilliant Idea. 123 through the narrow space now betwe
443. Brilliant Idea. 123 through the narrow space now between the islet left vacant and t
444. y the water hissed, and 124 A Brilliant Idea. the mass of fire fell to pieces and wa
445. hough danger was averted, not still how many more had they quer? to con- Who could f
446. might them ? employ against A Brilliant Idea. 125 These reflections soon dispelled t
447. g to his feet, stifling a cry, and this time it was a cry of joy. " Eedwood, Fabian,
448. bian," he exclaimed, " we are saved ; I will !" answer for that myself." Canadian, i
449. but now I give it i]p; 126 A Brilliant Idea. there are three of us ; we can by main
450. proach of morning; we have not too much time before us. If I have not lost my sailor
451. ave not lost my sailor's eye, the river will not take us more than three knots an ho
452. better," said Pepe, " the displacement will not be so visible." The brave Canadian
453. visible." The brave Canadian only took time enough to shake hands with his two comp
454. doubt, Fabian; but A we also Brilliant Idea. 127 run the rope risk of scattering li
455. t just as pends on preserving the has ' nature made it. There is perhaps some parent b
456. m of the river which holds it in place. Many trees years must have elapsed since the
457. pe, in whom danger re- 128 A. Brilliant Idea. vived superstitious notions, " the hoo
458. notions, " the hoot of an owl at such a time means no good." " It replied is a perfe
459. hoot of an owl at such a time means no good." " It replied is a perfect imitation,
460. n. we are under inspec- It is a sort of death-song with which they are regaling us."
461. are regaling us." The Canadian had the same barely concluded when harmony was repea
462. uded when harmony was repeated from the other bank with modulations sometimes derisiv
463. mo- mentous night. A " I long Brilliant Idea. 129 to shout to them to roar instead,
464. igers that they are," said Pepe. " Take good care not to do reveal to cals it, for i
465. ell, I think," re- Redwood; "I see only one at present 130 -A Brilliant Idea. which
466. ee only one at present 130 -A Brilliant Idea. which keeps the island in anchor of me
467. I under shove of this islet which, with one my fragments." shoulders, I could scatt
468. the head of the Canadian. A rather long time elapsed^ if during which, as Fabian's f
469. like a vessel in the swell of the sea. One a last felt that the giant effort. must
470. Redwood was perhaps struggling against death, and then a heavy crack, like that of t
471. 31 132 Between Hope and Despair. the At same instant the Canadian came again to the
472. rushed there with violence. With islet, one bound he regained his place on the whic
473. ength. whom despair had given tenfold " God be praised !" cried he, " the last is a
474. Now," said Redwood, " our the hands of God. If the islet stays in the middle of th
475. be out of and reach of the Indians. my God !" he cried, with fervor, " a few more
476. rom that quarter the danger was and the chance of escaping the notice of the Indian se
477. r peril menaced The floating island, no matter how gently 134 Between Hope and Despair
478. from the straight and In- run ashore on one of the banks. dians occupied both. The
479. oomy silence the tortuous and uncertain progress of their of reeds islet. Sometimes when
480. shook under a light breeze coming from one of the shores, it site seemed to inclin
481. site seemed to incline toward the oppo- one by describing a large circle; some- tim
482. rcle; some- times, also, when seized by one of the cur- rents formed by the inequal
483. haded the banks ceased to be visible. " Courage," said Pepe ; " so long as we do not se
484. ong as we do not see the trees, it is a sign that we are in to the right way. Oh ! i
485. hat we are in to the right way. Oh ! if God continues favor us, plenty of yelling w
486. d continues favor us, plenty of yelling will echo along these peaceful shores when d
487. the old hunter, " that was a brilliant idea, Pepe; in ; my trouble it never occurre
488. e it never occurred to me such a simple idea !" " Those are always the last that com
489. se are always the last that come to the mind ; but do you know what that proves. Red
490. 36 Between Hope and Despair. is fear of death tion, already a serious preoccupait is
491. to run risks there long with those whom one loves better than life; this new risk e
492. g with those whom one loves better than life; this new risk exposes a I tell man to
493. an life; this new risk exposes a I tell man to losing all his resources. you frankl
494. sources. you frankly, Redwood, for some time past you." I scarcely know " True ; I s
495. possession of him, during which, like a man whose body absent, he seemed is present
496. emed is present while his to observe It soul is no longer the movements of the float
497. twenty years had lived in the boundless liberty of the deserts, to renounce that to giv
498. f the deserts, to renounce that to give life was equivalent to death; up seeing Fabi
499. nce that to give life was equivalent to death; up seeing Fabian every of day, and the
500. ir. 137 was likewise to bid farewell to happiness. Fabian and the desert were the two dom
501. were the two dominant affections of his life; to abandon either seemed impossible. I
502. ther seemed impossible. In the hunter's soul there was going on a struggle between t
503. ing on a struggle between the civilized man and the man whom long habit had rendere
504. uggle between the civilized man and the man whom long habit had rendered almost It
505. the civilized man and the man whom long habit had rendered almost It savage. was not
506. ith greater anxiety in the direction of one of the banks. to Through the veil of mi
507. ue," answered the Canadian, resting his mind from its meditations ; " it is easy to
508. erto had occupied a much distant longer time, trees and the tops became less of the
509. ll moving toward the which but just now One of the fires shed only a pale gleam thr
510. he eyes Redwood. Already they could see one of the Indian Between Hope and Despair.
511. g erect and motionless in his frightful war costume. The long mane it of a bison co
512. row, how quickly would send that in the other human bison to mount guard world!" repl
513. in the other human bison to mount guard world!" replied the Spaniard. It was not long
514. , was hideous and terrible to behold. A man of ordinary courage without a shudder.
515. d terrible to behold. A man of ordinary courage without a shudder. could not see him Bu
516. for some instants in the attitude of a man who seeks to distinguish a distant ob-
517. e signals sent by the sentinels to each other in imitation of the notes of nocturnal
518. was no room for misapprehen- sion; the fate of the islet would be that of the piece
519. safer at least, if not altogether safe. will " Day soon break now/' said Red- wood;
520. w/' said Red- wood; "we must we land on one side or the other, for as shall go twic
521. od; "we must we land on one side or the other, for as shall go twice as fast on foot
522. d Pepe; "then from there on foot, to we will follow the water course conceal our tra
523. ns, carrying, if necessary, the wounded man in our arms; we can make hour. at least
524. d laid the grass. him on At The wounded man awoke. from sight of a place altogether
525. hat where he had gone to sleep, and the change which was evident in spite of the darkn
526. Saved! safety. away now, and we are in God be blessed for having permitted I hold
527. pe and Fabian. After giving the scalped man a few mo- ments to recover his senses,
528. the march with us," Pepe Mexican, " we will make a sort of litter for you. lose if
529. t of litter for you. lose if We have no time to we are to escape those marauders, wh
530. marauders, who, as soon as day breaks, will begin the people of their sort finest c
531. e to give Christians." So great was the desire of the wounded man to escape as fast as
532. So great was the desire of the wounded man to escape as fast as possible from a ne
533. almost Saved! 149 forgot the atrocious pain he was enduring,. He declared that he c
534. n no vestige remained of the raft which nature so had taken many years to build. 150 S
535. d of the raft which nature so had taken many years to build. 150 Saved 1 the last br
536. s The greater por- tion flowed into the other branch. for the This was a favorable ci
537. s was a favorable circumstance, wounded man would have caused a if long delay he we

Author: Eric Lease Morgan <emorgan@nd.edu>
Date created: October 16, 2010
Date updated: August 23, 2016
URL: https://concordances.library.nd.edu/app/